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Board of Selectmen: 

Seated (1-r) Charles J. Wayne (Chairman), Patrick J. McNally 

Standing (1-r) William E. George, Weymouth M. Atkinson, Jr., James R. Engel 

Photo courtesy of Beverly Times 



Cover: Aerial photo of Great Neck courtesy of Gregory Dann Photography, 
Ipswich, MA 



ANNUAL REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 

1992 



Ipswich Public Library 

25 North Main St. 
IjHwtch, MA. 01936 



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1 



1992 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Roster of Town Officials and Committees 2 

April 6 , 1992 Annual Town Meeting 5 

Operating Budget 8 

July 27 , 1992 Special Town Meeting 34 

October 17 , 1992 Special Town Meeting 39 

Board of Selectmen 7 3 

Town Manager 74 

Department of Public Safety 75 

Police Department 75 

Fire Division 76 

Animal Control 77 

Harbors 78 

Shellfish 79 

Emergency Management 79 

Department of Public Works 80 

Public Works Divisions 80 

Cemetery/ Parks Department 82 

Solid Waste Advisory Committee 82 

Department of Code Enforcement 84 

Building 84 

Health 84 

Zoning Board of Appeals 85 

Department of Planning and Development 85 

Planning Board 85 

Conservation Commission 87 

Historical Commission 88 

Master Plan Commission 89 

Department of Human Services 89 

Recreation Department 89 

Council On Aging 91 

Department of Utilities 92 

Electric Department 92 

Water Division 92 

Sewer Division 93 

Ipswich Public Library 93 

Finance Department 95 

Accounting Office 95 

Treasurer/Collector 96 

Assessors Office 97 

Town Clerk 97 

Elections and Registrations 99 

Ipswich Arts Council 101 

Open Space and Recreation Committee 102 

Coastal Pollution Control Committee 102 

Hall-Haskell House Standing Committee 103 

Commuter Rail Committee 104 

Ipswich Housing Authority 104 

School Department 105 

Town of Ipswich Revenue Sharing Handicapped Regulations ... 115 

Financial Statements - Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1992 ... 116 



1992-1993 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



ELECTED 



E BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Patrick J. McNally 
Charles J. Wayne, Ch 
James R. Engel 
Weymouth Atkinson, Jr 
Wil 1 iam E. George 

E SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Jeffrey Simon 
Cynthia Quinn, Ch 
David Pauley 
Margot Sherwood 
Joseph Rogers 
Norman Sheppard 
Lawrence Seidler 

E CONSTABLE 

Peter Dziadose 

E TOWN MODERATOR 
A. James Grimes 



1993 
1995 
1993 
1995 
1994 



1995 
1995 
1993 
1994 
1994 
1993 
1993 



1992 



1993 



E2 



03 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Elected At Town Meeting 



Walter Pojasek 


1993 


Boyd Finch 


1994 


Marion Swan 


1995 


Appointed By Moderator 




Wil 1 iam Craft 


1994 


Jamie Fay, Ch 


1993 


Clark Ziegler 


1995 


Appointed By Selectmen 





Eugene Hailson 
Geoffrey Hunt 
Raymond Morley 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Robert E. Como 
Catherine Cecil , Ch 
Sarah S. O'Connor 
Arthur Weagle 
Joseph Brady (State) 



1993 
1994 
1995 



1996 
1995 
1994 
1993 
1996 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 



S TOWN MANAGER 

George E. Howe 
SI FINANCE DIRECTOR/TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Donna M. Wal sh 
SI UTILITIES DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR 

Donald R. Stone 
SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Virginia M. Cleary 
Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank J. Ragonese 
Ml CODE ENFORCER/BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Edward A. J. Poskus 
Ml TOWN PLANNER 

Elizabeth M. Ware 
Ml FIRE CHIEF 

Willard I. Maker 
Ml HARBORMASTER 

Charles D. Surpitski 

Charles B. Schwartz, Deputy 
Ml HEALTH AGENT 

Domenic A. Badolato 
Ml LIBRARIAN 

Eleanor M. Gaunt 
Ml TOWN CLERK 

Frances A. Richards 
Mi TOWN COUNSEL 

Kopelman and Paige, P.C. 



Ml POLICE CHIEF 

Charles D. Surpitski 
Ml PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 

Armand T. Michaud 
Ml RECREATION DIRECTOR 

Elizabeth M. Dorman 
Ml SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Philip A. Kent 
7 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Richard F. Thompson 
M PARKING CLERK 

Wil 1 iam E. Handren, Jr. 
M PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Robert R. Hyde 
Ml ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Harry W. Leno, Jr. 
Ml TOWN ENGINEER 

James E. Chase 
Ml PARKING CLERK 

Wi 1 1 iam E. Handren, Jr. 
Ml CEMETERY/PARKS SUPERINTENDENT 

James E. Graffum 
Ml DEPUTY TAX COLLECTOR 

Richard E. Sullivan 
M WIRING INSPECTOR 

Raymond P. Budzianowski 



' -2- 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M CEMETERY & PARKS COMMISSION 

Arthur N. Sotis, Ch 1994 

Nicholas Markos 1993 

Theodore LeMieux 1995 

M CIVIL DEFENSE 

David Clements, Dir 1993 

John T. Clogston, Asst 1993 

S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 

Dorcas Rice 1993 

Vivian Endicott 1993 

Joseph Carl in 1993 

William Varrel 1 , Ch 1993 

James R. Ford 1993 

William Faissler 1993 



M6 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Lillian V. North, Ch 


1993 


Joseph M. Pecoraro 


1993 


Wayne M. Castonguay 


1993 


Nicholas A. Vontzalides 


1994 


Brandon Boyd 


1995 


Andrew Agapow 


1995 


Beverly Perna 


1994 


COUNCIL ON AGING 




Winfred Hardy, Ch 


1995 


Jeanne N. Parker 


1995 


Helen Drenth 


1993 


Rita Poirier 


1994 


Anthony Christopher 


1994 


Hubert Tougas 


1995 


Deborah P. Bouranis 


1993 


Helen Kalafatas 


1993 


FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 




George E. Howe, Dir. 


1993 


Tone Kenney 


1993 


Sara O'Connor 


1993 



S GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Phill ip F. Grenier 

M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Frank J. Ragonese 
John D. Heaphy 
John Moberger 



1991 



1993 
1995 
1994 



M6 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Mary P. Conley 1994 

Susan Nelson 1993 

Donald Curiale, Ch 1993 

Arthur L. Dioli , Jr. 1993 

Coco McCabe 1994 

Marjorie H. Robie 1995 

Richard B. MacKinnon 1994 

S IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 

Mary Weatherall 1993 

Mary Pollak 1993 

Bror Hultgren 1993 

Judith Imm 1993 

Georgina Jill Traverso 1994 

Jon Aaron 1994 

Kristin Ledson 1994 

Michele S. McGrath 1994 

William I. Rogers, Co-Ch 1994 

Diane Faissler, Ch 1994 

Deborah Mules 1994 

S LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Marion Frost 1995 

Donald M. Greenough 1993 

Hubert Johnson 1993 

Lawrence Pszenny 1993 

Rainer Broekel , Ch 1994 

Virginia Jackson 1994 

Bette Siegel 1995 

Louise Sweetser 1995 

George R. Gray 1994 

MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 

CC Andrew Agapow 1993 

S Weymouth M. Atkinson Jr. 1993 

S Susan T. Monahan 1993 

S Patrick J. McNally 1993 

ZBA David Moynihan 1993 

ZBA James Theodosopoulos 1993 

HC Thomas Clements 1993 

HC Timothy Mauser 1993 

PB Leslie Brooks, Ch 1993 

IHA Sara O'Connor 1993 

CC Barbara Ostberg 1993 

FC Geoffrey Hunt 



-3- 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



03 HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 



M PLANNING BOARD 



Vivian Endicott, 


1993 


Theresa Stephens, Co-Ch 


1993 


Helen M. Burr 


1993 


Stephanie Gaskins, Co-Ch 


1993 


Wil 1 iam L . Thoen 


1993 


Marion Frost 


1993 


Joyce Harrington 


1993 


Norman Quint 


1993 


Joanne McMahon, Associate 


1993 


BOARD OF HEALTH 




Carl G. Hiltunen 


1993 


Kenneth L. Zinn, M.D. 


1994 


Susan C. Hubbard 


1995 


RECREATION COMMISSION 




Jim Prato 


1993 


Bruce Bryant 


1994 


Linda M. Murphy 


1995 


Jennifer Wile 


1995 


Marc i a Ford 


1993 


Lawrence Drown 


1994 


Chris Walker 


1993 


REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 




Mary Maloney 


1994 


Edmund Traverso 


1993 


Peter M. Ross 


1995 



Ml Frances A. Richards, Clerk 

S SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 
Thomas Dorman 
Ernest Brockelbank 
Alice H. Thanos, Ch 
Andrew Gianakakis 
Forrest W. MacGilvary 
Anthony Christopher 
Wayne Castonguay 

S HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTE 
Paul McGinley 
Susan Boice 
Anne Brown 
Prudence Fish 
Dana Jordan 
Kenneth Savoie 
Valda Schreiber 

APPOINTMENT LEGEND 
E Elected 

Appointed By Board of Selectmen 

Appointed By Town Manager 

Other 

Supervised By Town Manager 

Elected At Town Meeting 



Wayne King 


1996 


Timothy Perkins 


1994 


Leslie Brooks, Ch 


1993 


John Beagan 


1995 


Pat Hagadorn 


1997 


ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 




James Theodosopoulos, Ch 


1997 


Dana P. Jordan 


1996 


David Levesque 


1993 


Arthur N. Sotis 


1994 


Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 


1995 


John R. Verani , Associate 


1993 


Joseph R. Petranek, Assoc 


1993 


OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 


COMMITTEE 


James Allen 


1993 


Bill Wells 


1993 


Lawrence G. Eliot 


1993 


Ruth M. Sherwood 


1993 


Jim Berry 


1993 


Glenn Hazelton 


1993 


David Standley 


1993 


CABLE TELEVISION 




George Howe 


1993 


Harris Smith 


1993 


Raymond Morley 


1993 


COASTAL POLLUTION CONTROL 


COMMITTEE 


Robert Cram, Ch 


1993 


Douglas Bender 


1993 


Wayne Castonguay 


1993 


Donald Cheney 


1993 


Carl Hiltunen 


1993 


Aldyth Innis 


1993 


Peter Pinciaro 


1993 


Michael Schaaf 


1993 


Ronald Cameron 


1993 


Kenneth Blades 


1993 


Wil 1 iam Wasserman 


1993 


Haines Danforth 


1993 


Joyce Harrington 


1993 


Joyce Kippin 


1993 


Ed Traverso 


1993 



1993 






Robert Cram, Ch 


1993 






Douglas Bender 


1993 






Wayne Castonguay 


1993 






Donald Cheney 


1993 






Carl Hiltunen 


1993 






Aldyth Innis 


1993 






Peter Pinciaro 
Michael Schaaf 


EE 






Ronald Cameron 


1993 






Kenneth Blades 


1993 






Wil 1 iam Wasserman 


1993 






Haines Danforth 


1993 






Joyce Harrington 


1993 






Joyce Kippin 


1993 






Ed Traverso 


1993 










3 


Appointed By Moderator 




4 


General Laws 




5 


1976 


STM, Article II 




6 


Conf i 


rmed by Board of Selectmen 




7 


Appoi 


nted by School Committee 




8 


Appointed by Conservation Com. 



-4- 



1992 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby 
directed to notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, 
qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH 
SCHOOL, in said Ipswich, on MONDAY, THE SIXTH OF APRIL, 1992, at 
7:30 O'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the follow- 
ing articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the meeting to order at 7:45 p.m. 
with 241 voters present. The final count was 538 at 9:00 p.m. 
Following the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag, it was moved, 
seconded and so voted to admit non-voters. Tellers appointed by 
the Moderator were Bruce Arbour, Paul Bedard, Bruce Bryant, 
Ronald Graves, Kenneth Murphy and Joni Soffron. 



ARTICLE 1 

To fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the salaries and compensation 
of all elected Town officers be approved as presented in the 
budget. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unani- 
mously recommended. Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 2 

To choose the following officers, viz: Constable for one (1) 
year; Moderator for one (1) year; two Selectmen for three (3) 
years; and two members of the School Committee for three (3) 
years. 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective 
polling places as follows: Precinct One — Agawam Village Recre- 
ation Hall, County Road; Precinct Two — Winthrop School, 
Central Street; Precinct Three — Ipswich High School, High 
Street; and Precinct Four — Whittier Manor Recreation Hall, 
Caroline Avenue; on Monday, April 13, 1992. The polls shall open 
at 10:00 a.m. and shall close at 8:00 p.m.; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectman William Walton moved that the Town vote to accept 
Article 2 as presented in the warrant for the April 6, 1992, 
Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried unanimously. 

-5- 



ARTICLE 3 



To choose one member of the Finance Committee for three (3) 
years. 

Moderator James Grimes announced that several citizens would be 
nominated to the Finance Committee for three (3) years. A hand 
count would be taken for each nominee with a runoff between the 
top two . 

There were three nominations: Donna Smith nominated by Bette 
Siegel, Marion Swan nominated by George Jewell and Clark Ziegler 
nominated by James Muench. All nominations were seconded. 
Walter Pojasek, acting chairman of the Finance Committee, spoke 
for Donna Smith, who was recommended to Town Meeting by the 
Finance Committee. William Markos, former member of the Finance 
Committee, recommended and urged support for Marion Swan. Clark 
Ziegler spoke in his own behalf. Selectman James Engel said the 
Board of Selectmen had chosen not to recommend but had voted 3-2 
before Town Meeting in support of Clark Ziegler. The two minori- 
ty votes were for Raymond Morley, who was not nominated. A 
motion to close the nominations with the three names carried on a 
unanimous voice vote. In the first vote, Marion Swan finished on 
top with 211 to 113 for Clark Ziegler and 104 for Donna Smith. 
In a runoff between Marion Swan and Clark Ziegler, Marion Swan 
won with 265 to Ziegler' s 129. Swan was declared elected. 

Walter Pojasek talked about retiring Finance Committee members 
Alice Shurcliff and Constance Surpitski who had faithfully served 
for twelve and thirteen years. Both received a standing ovation. 



ARTICLE 4 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative 
to the municipal budget, and to raise, appropriate, transfer 
money from available funds, and change the purpose of the unex- 
pended balances of prior appropriations, all to be used for the 
ensuing year's operations, including the compensation of elected 
Town Officers; and to authorize the town to enter into one or 
more five-year contracts for solid waste collection and/or 
disposal; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Walter Pojasek, acting chairman of the Finance Committee, moved 
that the Town vote (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$6,761,905 for the purposes indicated in the FY93 Operating 
Budget as outlined in the Finance Committee Report, pp. 19-25; 
and (2) I further move that: 



-6- 



For the Operating Budget of $6,761,905 the Town: 
Transfer from Available Funds: 

Water Pollution Control $ 28,208 
Cemetery Perpetual Care and Flower Fund Interest: 

Offset Cemeteries and Parks Division Budget 26,000 
Cemeteries Sales of Lots Fund Principal: 

Offset Cemeteries and Parks Division Capital Outlay 3,700 

High School Land Purchase (sewer installation - gift) 130 

Insurance Reimbursments (FY91 audit worksheets) 3 9,83 7 

Miscellaneous, Administration 6,046 

Library Air Conditioning (Article 18, 4/3/89 ATM 467 
Sewer System Evaluation Survey (Article 30, 4/7/86 ATM) 2,696 
Wetlands Protection Fund: 

Offset Conservation Commission Budget 1,200 

Plum Island National Wildlife Refuge in lieu payment 75,511 
State Aid - Transportation of Special Needs Students 

(FY91 audit worksheets) 7,972 

Stabilization Fund 21,053 

State Library Aid Offset: Library Budget 891 

Total: 213,711 
Net to be raised and assessed: $6,548/194; 

and (3) authorize the Town to enter into one or more five-year 
contracts for solid waste collection and/or disposal. Seconded. 

Mr. Pojasek carefully explained the Budget in the Finance Commit- 
tee report. The Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen unani- 
mously recommended this budget. Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 5 

To hear and act upon the reports of the Finance Committee and of 
the School Committee relative to the School Department budget 
and to raise, appropriate, transfer money, and change the purpose 
of the unexpended balances of prior appropriations, all to be 
used for the ensuing year's operations; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Cynthia Quinn, Chairman of the School Committee, moved that the 
Town vote to raise and assess the sum of $8,554,600 for the 
School Department Budget for FY 1993. Seconded. 

Mrs. Quinn explained the revised school committee budget and 
urged support. Richard Thompson, Superintendent of Schools, 
revealed the current problems with school budget cuts and school 
choice and urged support for the school budget. School Commit- 
tee, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen unanimously sup- 
ported the school budget. Motion carried unanimously. 

-7- 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



FY9 
EXPENDED 



FY91 
EXPENDED 



FY92 * 
APPRO . 



FY93 

RECOMMENDED 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: ADMINISTRATION & LEGAL 



003 SELECTMEN: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

005 TOWN MANAGER: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Labor Consultants 

Capital Outlay 

Total 

009 MODERATOR: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Total 

011 FINANCE COMMITTEE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

04 5 LEGAL: 

Salaries & Wages 

Town Counsel-Litigation 

Special Counsel 

Expenses 

Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
ADMINISTRATION & LEGAL 



$18,346 


$19,555 


$17,688 


$19,149 


2,636 


3,521 


5,975 


6,080 





356 


400 


370 














20,982 


23,432 


24,063 


25,599 


102,330 


105,770 


89,235 


89,235 


20,738 


21,043 


14,218 


11,496 


660 


10,892 


5,000 


5,000 











7,300 


123,728 


137,705 


108,453 


113,031 


100 


100 


100 


100 








10 





100 


100 


110 


100 








2,000 





2,960 


2,440 


3,525 


3,525 


2,960 


2,440 


5,525 


3,525 


12,960 


12,960 


14,300 


14,300 


28,000 


28,000 


28,000 


28,000 


13,122 


3,762 


10,000 


5,000 


2,171 


1,116 


2,580 


2,380 


56,253 


45,838 


54,880 


49,680 


204,023 


209,515 


193,031 


191,935 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



015 ELECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

025 ACCOUNTANT: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



10,824 

6,768 



17,592 



88, 106 

23, 189 



111,295 



19,090 

2,967 



22,057 



86,635 

20,964 

4,082 

111,681 



11,292 

6,950 



18,242 



88,925 

23,635 



112,560 



15,819 

6,460 



22,279 



91,705 

21,415 

1,800 

114,920 



-8- 



029 ASSESSORS: 

Salaries & Wages 
Valuation Fee 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

03 3 TREASURER/ COLLECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

03 5 PURCHASING & BUDGET 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

03 9 TOWN CLERK: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



FY90 

KPENDED 


FY91 
EXPENDED 


FY92 * 
APPRO. 


FY9 3 
RECOMMENDED 


95,131 

5,200 

9,615 

500 

110,446 


100,249 

3,500 

10,424 



114,173 


104,815 

3,500 

11,410 



119,725 


104,646 

3,500 

10,550 

275 

118,971 


94,116 

12,405 



1,591 

108,112 


87,948 

13,040 

61 

242 

101,291 


108,991 

15,394 

2,800 



127,185 


107,187 

11,402 

2,700 

1,100 

122,389 














25,516 
6,620 
4,500 

36,636 


25,420 

5,380 

300 

31,100 


46,558 

2,710 



159 

49,427 


34,355 

2,343 

300 



36,998 


49,008 

3,727 

300 



53,035 


49,547 

3,129 





52,676 


396,872 


386,200 


467,383 


462,335 



PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 



063 PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Planning Consultants: 

Reimbursable 

General 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

064 MASTER PLAN COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Planning Consultants 
Total 



46,958 
2,854 


50,074 
3,201 


50,472 
5,975 


50,980 
5,875 



52,000 


01,812 








53,275 



20,000 


76,447 








56,855 


730 

136 

6,000 

6,866 


880 



880 


1,000 

700 



1,700 


1,000 
1,100 
5,000 
7,100 



-9- 



481 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

487 CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT 



FY90 


FY91 


FY92 * 


FY93 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


APPRO. 


RECOMMENDED 


50 


145 


1,000 


250 


8,200 


282 


1,400 


600 











2,000 














8,250 


427 


2,400 


2,850 





1,800 


1,800 


1,800 


2,560 


370 


1,375 


725 


1,481 





1,000 


1,400 


4,041 


2,170 


4,175 


3,925 


120,969 


56,752 


84,722 


70,730 



PUBLIC SAFETY DEPARTMENT 



101 


POLICE: 












Salaries & Wages 


858,375 


945,184 


997,438 


997,331 




Expenses 


29,571 


36,139 


43,179 


39,111 




Energy Supplies 


28,076 


26,635 


38,205 


36,956 




Drug Enforcement Fund 


1,000 


1,000 


500 







Ambulance Contract 


125,000 


125,000 


125,000 


135,000 




Capital Outlay 


148,741 


31,319 


32,146 


33,896 




Total 


1,190,763 


1,165,277 


1,236,468 


1,242,294 


102 


HARBORS : 












Salaries & Wages 





3,586 


6,930 


3,520 




Expenses 


4,529 


4,040 


4,805 


4,205 




Energy Supplies 


563 


686 


1,050 


980 




Capital Outlay 


8,372 


4,428 










Total 


13,464 


12,740 


12,785 


8,705 


103 


FIRE: 












Salaries & Wages 


644,822 


672,700 


717,660 


712,301 




Training 


1,854 


2,143 


3,200 


2,900 




Expenses 


55,029 


44,778 


39,762 


37,369 




Energy Supplies 


6,013 


6,789 


13,688 


11,491 




Capital Outlay 


208,758 


10,980 


3,425 


15,500 




Total 


916,476 


737,390 


777,735 


779,561 


112 


SHELLFISH: 












Salaries & Wages 


30,322 


30,917 


32,259 


32,259 




Consultants 


900 













Expenses 


2,312 


4,049 


2,625 


2,525 




Energy Supplies 


1,006 


700 


1,650 


1,384 




Capital Outlay 
















Total 


34,540 


35,666 


36,534 


36,168 



■10- 



131 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

13 3 ANIMAL CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY DEF'T, 



FY9 


FY91 


FY92 * 




FY93 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


APPRO. 


RECOMMENDED 


3,000 


3,000 


3,200 




3,200 


2,075 


1,861 


2,075 




1,450 








75 




75 
















5,075 


4,861 


5,350 




4,725 


21,000 


23,616 


24,512 




24,692 


4,569 


3,534 


4,032 




3,705 


434 


522 


1,865 




1,802 





193 










26,003 


27,865 


30,409 




30,199 


2,186,321 


1,983,799 


2,099,281 


2 


,101,652 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



065 TOWN HALL & ANNEX: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

109 FORESTRY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

301 ADMINISTRATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

303 HIGHWAY: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Road Treatment 

Capital Outlay 

Total 

3 05 SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Rental 
Total 



20,952 


22, 


,906 


22, 


,583 


23,045 


17,807 


16, 


-375 


10, 


,576 


11,042 


7,351 


6, 


, 128 


IV, 


,817 


18,358 


1,762 


8, 


,912 




544 


6,925 


47,872 


54, 


,321 


51, 


,520 


59,370 


73,698 















21,461 















2,727 















14,181 















112,067 















58,356 


62, 


,908 


65, 


,286 


65,203 


2,298 


2, 


,473 


2, 


,492 


2,706 


















60,654 


65, 


,381 


67, 


,778 


67,909 


183,079 


195, 


, 341 


216, 


,991 


211,541 


140,981 


125, 


,069 


184, 


,780 


175,474 


196,650 


178, 


,471 


176, 


,900 


140,000 


171,358 


18, 


,259 


4, 


,000 


28,500 


692,068 


517, 


,140 


582, 


,671 


555,515 


44,491 


17, 


,032 


25, 


,000 


25,000 


84,937 


56, 


,871 


67, 


,550 


67,550 


7,217 


3, 


,995 


5, 


,600 


5,600 


24,877 


6, 


,010 


27, 


,000 


27,000 


161,522 


83, 


,908 


125, 


,150 


125,150 



•11- 



3 09 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Consultants 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

403 SANITATION CONTRACT: 

Sanitation Composite Contract 

Spring & Fall Cleaning 

Sanit. Revolving Fund/Other Ex 

Capital Outlay 

Total 

510 SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



FY90 
EXPENDED 

28,163 


38,875 

9,546 



76,584 



402,000 

48,000 





450,000 



571 CEMETERIES, PARKS & BUILDING MAINTENANCE: 



Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS DEP'T. 

UTILITIES DEPARTMENT 



162,498 

24,871 

7,860 

12,420 

207,649 



FY91 
EXPENDED 

30,068 


32,219 

9,556 



71,843 



606,313 

23,927 





630,240 



180,181 

21,515 

8,004 

20,898 

230,598 



FY92 * 
APPRO. 

32,266 


35,840 

15,840 


83,946 



599,694 



36,510 



636,204 



28,342 

590 

1,030 



29,962 



195,362 

23,861 

11,341 

3,800 

234,364 



FY93 

RECOMMENDED 

31,737 

36,860 
14,321 
2,000 
84,918 



457,215 



5,000 

8,000 

470,215 



26,183 

680 

1,106 



27,969 



195,289 

25,302 

10,584 

5,770 

236,945 



1,808,416 1,653,431 1,811,595 1,627,991 



409 SEWER: 

Salaries & Wages 

Benefits 

Consultants 

Expenses 

Insurance 

Energy Supplies 

Interest & Debt Payment 

Capital Outlay 

Total 

TOTAL UTILITIES DEPARTMENT 



194,190 


165,804 


188,778 


162,938 





40,359 


34,015 


33,307 





33,726 


5,950 


6,050 


201,821 


85,567 


139,949 


146,313 





15,209 


9,257 


7,450 


8,427 


109,200 


106,479 


102,983 





5,908 





1,867 








4,900 


9,900 


404,438 


455,773 


489,328 


470,808 


404,438 


455,773 


489,328 


470,808 



■12- 



FY90 
EXPENDED 



FY91 

EXPENDED 



FY92 * 
APPRO. 



FY93 

RECOMMENDED 



CODE ENFORCEMENT DEPARTMENT 

061 APPEALS BOARD: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

113 BUILDING INSPECTION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Inspection Consultant 
Energy Supplies 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

501 HEALTH: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Energy Supplies 
Emergency Fund 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

502 HEALTH CONTRACTS: 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Total 

TOTAL CODE ENFORCEMENT 

HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT 



935 


881 


3,000 


3,000 


345 


540 


1,302 


957 














1,280 


1,421 


4,302 


3,957 


45,639 


50,651 


50,353 


59,353 


2,350 


2,971 


3,000 


1,500 


444 


423 


722 


611 


3,305 


2,891 


3,860 


2,510 


540 











52,278 


56,936 


57,935 


63,974 


72,907 


77,451 


50,300 


50,300 


187,973 


172,626 


6,485 


4,935 





7,228 


6,042 


6,042 

















300 


1,000 


750 














260,880 


257,605 


63,827 


62,027 








173,425 


151,232 








2,700 


2,700 








176,125 


153,932 


314,438 


315,962 


302,189 


283,890 



531 COUNCIL ON AGING: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

551 VETERANS' BENEFITS: 
Expenses 
Total 

621 RECREATION AND YOUTH SERVICES: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Youth Services 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES DEP'T. 






9,830 
21,436 
31,266 


9,944 
22,319 
32,263 


11,928 
21,505 
33,433 


12,427 
22,157 
34,584 


147, 106 
147, 106 


99,636 
99,636 


125,000 
125,000 


125,000 
125,000 


56,446 
18,605 
419 

22,489 
97,959 


63,108 

13,595 

382 





77,085 


65,397 

19,917 

950 





86,264 


65,306 

16,331 

660 





82,297 


276,331 


208,984 


244,697 


241,881 



-13- 



FY90 FY91 FY92 * FY93 
EXPENDED EXPENDED APPRO. RECOMMENDED 



LIBRARY 



601 LIBRARY: 

Salaries & Wages 176,872 181,290 191,568 188,345 

Expenses 71,471 67,189 69,076 67,478 

Energy Supplies 1,296 6,208 6,960 6,424 

Capital Outlay 450 395 1,575 3,120 

TOTAL LIBRARY DEPT 250,089 255,082 269,179 265,367 

UNCLASSIFIED 



081 


INSURANCE: 




195,734 


219, 


,024 


276,949 


266,476 


071 


BENEFITS: 

Military Service Credits 

County Retirement System 

Health & Life 

Medicare 

Total 




17,015 
400,191 
134,665 

16,506 
568,377 


17, 
417, 
197, 

18, 
650, 


,528 
,670 
,268 
,459 
,925 


18,054 
479,083 
188,852 

44,335 
730,324 


18,054 
452,132 
150,964 

28,791 
649,941 


701 


DEBT SERVICE: 
Payment of Principal 
Payment of Interest 
Interest on Tax Ant. Notes 
Total 




200,000 

3,151 

10,235 

213,386 


14, 
14, 






,716 

,716 






12,600 

12,600 






14,800 

14,800 


091 


OFFICE SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT: 
Equip. Repair/Replacement 
Software & Programming Service 
Office Supplies Consolid. Acct 
Total 


56,336 



56,336 


9, 
9, 


,616 



,616 


9,500 



9,500 


9,600 

3,600 

19,600 

32,800 


013 


RESERVE FUND: (Transfers into appropriate 
funded § $45,000 in all years) 


budgets in 
31,064 


prior years; 
45,000 


45,000 


091 


AUDIT FEE: 




42,250 


43, 


,050 


38,338 


18,000 


091 


SALARY TRANSFER ACCOUNT: ** 












8,491 





091 


LICENSE FEES/EMPLOYEE TRAINING 










1,360 


1,800 


091 


POSTAGE: 




14,819 


15, 


060 


24,800 


16,500 



TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 1,090,902 983,455 1,147,362 1,045,317 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET: $7,052,799 $6,508,953 $7,108,767 $6,761,905 

* Note: FY '92 reflects Reserve Fund transfers through November 30, 1991. 
** Represents allowance for salary/wage increases which in prior years 
have been incorporated in individual department budgets. 



-14- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH SCHOOLS 

RECOMMENDED OPERATING BUDGET 

for 

Fiscal Year 1993 

Introduction - Action by the Annual Town Meeting, Monday, April 6, 
1992, will establish the total amount of money to be set aside for 
schools. Once this budget total is established, the School 
Committee, by statute, has fiscal autonomy and may use the funds in 
the best interest of the schools. The Town of Ipswich School 
Budget, which follows, represents the School Committee's best 
estimate of the way funds voted at Town Meeting will be deployed. 

Selected Budget Items 



FY 91 
Actual 



Central Office - 1 Lord Square 
Bldg. = 2,576 sq.ft. 

Personnel 

Superintendent 
Business Manager 
Director of Special Ed. 
Support Staff 
Subtotal: 

Curriculum (Stipends) 

Math 

Science 

Social Studies 

Critical Thinking 

Instructional Expenses 

Non-instructional Expenses 

Energy 
Capital 



FY 92 
Budgeted 



FY 93 
Proposed 



$ 342,482 


$ 324,384 


$ 340,162 


6,778 


6,600 


6,600 


5,577 


6,600 


6,600 








6,600 


5,727 


6,600 


6,600 


16,318 


31,445 


45,745 


472,306 


442,681 


332,202 


32,687 


25,250 


28,250 


267,025 


199,463 


167,028 



Winthrop School - 63 Central Street 
Bldg. = 38,750 sq.ft. Teaching Stations 
Personnel 

Teachers 

Other Personnel 



Instructional Expenses 
Regular Program 
Special Education 
Art/Music 
Physical Education 



= 29 



Students =4 58 



Non-instructional 
Capital 



43,535 
11,801 


876,468 
215,326 


843,073 
227,463 


71,447 

923 

6,057 

198 


67,765 

952 

6,305 

736 


43,888 

947 

6,161 

510 


57,408 
557 


61,453 
400 


58,253 
1,154 



-15- 



Doyon School - 210 Linebrook Road 

Bldg. = 38,300 sq.ft. Teacher Stations 



Personnel 
Teachers 
Other Personnel 

Instructional Expenses 
Regular Program 
Special Education 
Art/Music 
Physical Education 

Non- instructional 
Capital 



933,427 
198,651 



63,003 

923 

4,234 

198 

56,544 
3,438 



= 25 



Students =418 



$ 965,077 $1,076,611 
206,858 216,326 



52 



. 347 

952 

5,936 

736 



61,032 
2,300 



51,168 

948 

5,351 

510 

56,159 




Middle School - 23 Green Street 

Bldg. = 54,200 sq.ft. Teacher Stations 



Personnel 
Teachers 
Other Personnel 

Instructional Expenses 

Regular Program 

Special Education 

Art/Music 

Physical Education 

Industrial Arts 

(Technical Education) 
Non- instructional 
Capital 



= 24 



Students =3 63 



904,184 


929,438 


950,061 


253,480 


258,407 


263,660 


73,526 


69,159 


61,184 


888 


872 


850 


6,997 


8,591 


7,485 


1,227 


1,234 


1,770 


5,418 


4,833 


5,488 


90,378 


93,677 


87,139 


14,076 


4,200 


4,200 



Students = 395 



High School - 13 High Street 

Bldg. = 63,000 sq.ft. Teacher Stations = 33 

Personnel 

Teachers 1,182,929 1,225,335 1,342,241 

Other Personnel 423,087 420,980 416,218 

Instructional Expenses 

Regular Program 184,031 178,073 136,869 

Special Education 497 946 855 

Art/Music 16,847 19,717 15,683 

Physical Education 2,848 2,615 3,496 

Industrial Arts 6,036 6,672 4,194 
(Technical Education) 

Non-instructional 125,944 135,699 132,221 

Capital 2,066 17,000 8,600 



-16- 



Misc. items: Transportation $ 1,616,039 $ 1,835,066 $ 1,868,712 

(SPED & Regular) 

Grounds Contract, Substitute 
Teachers, Employee Benefits, 
Bldgs. & Grounds Maint. , etc. 



TOTALS $ 8,511,645 $ 8,780,000 $ 8,839,235 

Plus: Returned to Town 204,359 

Minus: To balance to FinCom 

vote of 2/29/92 285,235 

ADJUSTED TOTALS: $ 8,716,004 $ 8,780,000 $ 8,554,000 



-17- 



ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money and/or transfer sums of money from available funds to cover 
the Town's share of the ensuing year's annual operating, debt 
service and capital expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Eugene Hailson, Whittier School Committeeman, moved that the Town 
vote (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $117,010 and $34,- 
693, to cover the Town's share of the ensuing year's annual 
operating and debt service expenses, and the Town's share of 
capital outlay, respectively, of the Whittier Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District; and (2) to offset this appropria- 
tion, the sum of $151,703 be appropriated and transferred from 
the stabilization fund for said purposes. Seconded. 

School Committeeman Lawrence Seidler recommended rejection of the 
Whittier School budget for 1993 because it had risen from $117- 
,010 to $151,703 in one year. A new formula used by the Whittier 
district for determining the amounts was partly responsible for 
the increase. Board of Selectmen voted not to support and the 
Finance Committee unanimously rejected the budget. Mr. Seidler 
outlined the process of rejection and Mr. Pojasek said there 
would be school as usual there, no matter what the financial 
situation is. Motion failed to carry on a 2/3 voice vote. 



ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the ensuing year's expenses of the Water Division, 
Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset by revenues of the 
Water Division during FY93, and to transfer a sum of money from 
the surplus account to water capital outlay and/or debt service; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,031,519 for the ensuing year's expenses 
of the Water Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be 
offset by revenues of the Water Division during FY93. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. 
Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay unpaid bills 
incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid; and (2) to raise 
and appropriate and/or to appropriate from the water surplus 
account a sum of money to pay any Water Division unpaid bills 



-18- 



incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectman William Walton moved that the Town vote (1) to appro- 
priate the sum of $165.00 to pay the following unpaid bills 
incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 

School Department: 
J. L. Hammett $ 3 5.00 

Cameron Office Supply 13 0.00; 

and (2) to transfer the sum of $165.00 from "Insurance Proceeds 
FY 1991 Audit Worksheets for said purposes. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. 
Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 9 

To see what action the Town will take with regard to the transfer 
of any surplus funds in the Electric Division, Department of 
Utilities. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town vote to transfer the 
sum of $190,805 from the surplus account in the Electric Divi- 
sion, Department of Utilities, for the purpose of reducing taxes. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectman and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote subject to the provisions of the 
Town Charter (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money to 
engage engineering services and to acquire any related materiel 
and/or services for the construction and maintenance of roads and 
bridges under Chapter 90 of the General Laws, as amended; and (2) 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and 
expend without further appropriation any federal and/or state 
grants which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman William George moved that the Town will vote subject to 
the provisions of the Town Charter (1) to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $189,375 to engage engineering services and to acquire 
any related materiel and/or services for the construction and 
maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the General 
Laws, as amended; and (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
apply for, accept, and expend without further appropriation any 
federal and/or state grants which may be available for the 
aforementioned purposes. Seconded. 

-19- 



Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. 
Motion carried unanimously. 

Leonard Heurlin, volunteer assistant to the Town Manager, thanked 
all the town employees for their cooperation in the reorganiza- 
tion of town departments. He also discussed working with Armand 
Michaud, Director of Public Works on a five-year capital improve- 
ment program for our roads and bridges. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to authorize the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to enter into a written 
agreement with a banking institution for the provision of banking 
services to the Town, in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 53F of Chapter 44 of the General Laws, as amended; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman William George moved that the Town vote to authorize 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
enter into a written agreement with a banking institution for the 
provision of banking services to the Town, in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 53F of Chapter 44 of the General Laws, as 
amended. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind the Town's authorization 
to borrow the unissued balance of monies authorized under article 
7 of the September 19, 1988, Special Town Meeting; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town vote to rescind the 
Town's authorization to borrow the unissued balance of monies 
authorized under article 7 of the September 19, 1988, Special 
Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended. Motion 
carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money 
to install new and replacement water meters and appurtenances and 
to obtain any and all materiel and services incidental thereto, 
and to raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or 
serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 

-20- 



Chapter 44, §8 (7A) ; (2) to appropriate a sum of money to under- 
take extraordinary repairs to the Town Hill water storage tank 
and appurtenances and to obtain any and all materiel and services 
incidental thereto, and to raise this appropriation by authoriz- 
ing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachu- 
setts General Laws Chapter 44 §8 (4A) ; (3) to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any federal, state, 
and/or private grants which may be available for the aforemen- 
tioned purposes; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to appropriate 
Article 13 as presented in the warrant for the April 6, 1992, 
Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Mr. Engel explained the new water meter replacement program which 
started last year to overhaul the Town's water meter system and 
the needed improvements to the Town Hill water tank. Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended. Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended part (2) of the motion and recommended 7-1, part (1) 
of the motion. 

Rev. Bruce Arbour spoke in favor of the water tank improvements 
and urged rejection of the first part of the motion which includ- 
ed the new "space-age meters." 

Rev. Arbour moved that action on this article be divided into two 
questions. Seconded. Motion to divide the article passed by 
majority voice vote. 

Rev. Arbour moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum 
of $250,000 to undertake extraordinary repairs to the Town Hill 
water storage tank and to obtain any and all materiel and servic- 
es incidental thereto; (2) to raise said appropriation by autho- 
rizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Select- 
men, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44 §8 (4A) ; and (3) to autho- 
rize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any 
federal, state, and/or private grants which may be available for 
the aforementioned purposes. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Motion carried unanimously. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate 
the sum of $250,000 to install new and replacement water meters 
and appurtenances and to obtain any and all materiel and services 
incidental thereto; (2) to raise said appropriation by authoriz- 
ing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachu- 
setts General Laws Chapter 44, §8 (7A) ; and (3) to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any federal, 
state, and/or private grants which may be available for the 
aforementioned purposes. Seconded. 






-21- 



Mr. Engel described the two new types of water meters utilizing 
telephone call-in and/or radio transponder technology. Under 
this system bills would be read electronically, issued on a 
monthly basis and labor for meter reading would be reduced. 
Board of Selectmen recommended. Finance Committee recommended 7- 
1. Residents David Warner and Irving Small said they had one of 
these new meters and they worked fine with no problems. 
Jamie Fay, opposing vote on the Finance Committee, argued the 
cost of installing the meters, including the cost of borrowing 
the money, wasn't worth it and urged voting against this motion. 
On a vote of 92 in favor and 277 against, the second part of the 
divided question on the water meters failed the 2/3 majority 
vote. 



ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to 
purchase and equip a new fire pumper and to obtain all services 
and/or materiel incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any federal and/or 
state grants for the aformentioned purposes; (3) to determine 
whether said appropriation shall be raised by authorizing the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue 
bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 44 §7 (9) ; said appropriation to be contin- 
gent upon the passage of a ballot referendum question exempting 
from the levy limit provisions of Proposition Two and One-Half 
the payment of principal and interest on bonds or notes issued 
for said purposes under the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 59, §21C(k); or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectman William George moved that the Town vote to place on the 
official ballot for the April 13, 1992, election the following 
question: 

"Shall the Town (1) appropriate the sum of $2 00,000 to purchase 
and equip a new fire pumper and to obtain all services and/or 
materiel incidental thereto; (2) authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to apply for, accept and expend any federal and/or state grants 
for the aformentioned purposes; (3) raise said appropriation by 
authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44 §7 (9) ; and (4) shall the 
Town be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two 
and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond 
issued in order to purchase said fire pumper?" Seconded. 

Mr. George explained the uses of the existing fire equipment and 
said this article needed a 2/3 majority to appropriate (floor 
vote) and a 2/3 majority also required to validate bonding, per 
local by-law/referendum. Board of Selectmen unanimously in favor 
of the purchase. Finance Committee unanimously supported re- 



-22- 



placement. Walter Pojasek commented on the Town's Fire Task 
Force report (June 1988) which called for the replacement of 
Engine #2, a 1965 Mack pumper. Acting Fire Chief Willard Maker 
and call firefighter Rev. Bruce Arbour spoke in favor. Motion 
carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to apppropriate a sum of money 
to survey, design, and construct a new addition to the Paul F. 
Doyon School and to obtain all services and/or materiel inciden- 
tal thereto; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply 
for, accept, and expend any federal and/or state grants which may 
be available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to determine 
whether said appropriation shall be raised by authorizing the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue 
bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 44, §7 (3); said appropriation to be contin- 
gent upon the passage of a ballot referendum question exempting 
from the levy limit provisions of Proposition Two and One-Half 
the payment of principal and interest on bonds or notes issued 
for said purposes under the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 59, §21C(k); or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Kenneth Savoie, School Building Needs Committee Chairman, moved 
that the Town vote to appropriate Article 15 as presented in the 
warrant for the April 6, 1992, Annual Town Meeting. The ballot 
question then shall be worded as follows: 

"Shall the Town be allowed to exempt from the provisions of 
proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to 
pay for the bond issued to design and construct an addition to 
the Doyon School?" Seconded. 

Mr. Savoie explained the enrollment projections coupled with 
overcrowded classrooms prompted the School Building Needs Commit- 
tee to recommend the construction of a four-classroom addition to 
the Doyon School, together with an addition to the media center 
and some retrofitting to make this school accessible for the 
disabled. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Alice Shurcliff, Finance Committee 
member and Jeffrey Simon, School Committee member spoke in favor. 
A 2/3 floor vote at Town Meeting and a majority on the ballot are 
needed to pass this article. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money, in addition to the sums raised and appropriated under 
Article 5 of the April 6, 1992, Annual Town Meeting, to supple- 
ment the school department budget for FY1993; or to take any 






-23- 



other action relative thereto. 

School Committeeman David Pauley moved that action on this 
article be postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and School Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money 
and to authorize the transfer of monies from water division 
surplus, the Conservation Fund, and/or any other available funds 
to engage legal, engineering, surveying, and appraisal services 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, 
gift, lease, or otherwise, two parcels of land apparently owned 
by Roy Smolenski, situate generally in the area of the Dow 
Reservoir watershed (Assessor's Map 19B, Lot 04 and Map 19D, Lot 
05) together consisting of approximately 3 3.6 acres more or less, 
for conservation and water protection purposes; (2) to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend without 
further appropriation any federal and/or state grants under the 
self-help program and/or the land and water conservation program 
for said purposes; and (3) to raise this appropriation by trans- 
ferring from available funds and/or by authorizing the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or 
serial notes under the pro- visions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 44, Section 8 (3); or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectman William George moved that the Town vote (1) to appro- 
priate the sum of $90,000 to engage legal, engineering, survey- 
ing, and appraisal services and to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to acquire by purchase, gift, lease, or otherwise, two 
parcels of land apparently owned by Roy Smolenski, situate 
generally in the area of the Dow Reservoir watershed (Assessor's 
Map 19B, Lot 04 and Map 19D, Lot 05) together consisting of 
approximately 3 3.6 acres more or less, for water protection and 
conservation purposes under the management and control of the 
Board of Selectmen; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
apply for, accept, and expend without further appropriation any 
federal and/or state grants under the self-help program and/or 
the land and water conservation program for said purposes; and 
(3) to raise said appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or 
serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 44, Section 8 (3). Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Conservation Committee 
unanimously in favor. Mr. George, Finance Committee member 
Geoffrey Hunt and Conservation Committee Chairman Lillian North 
all spoke in favor. Motion carried unanimously. 

-24- 



ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to be placed in the stabilization fund; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the sum of $40,000 be raised and 
appropriated and be placed in the stabilization fund. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended 

to support this article. 

Mr. Engel explained the motion and suggested putting the money 

aside to avoid overrides. Retiring Finance Committee member 

Alice Shurcliff urged voters to place "a little money in the 

cookie jar" by placing it into the so-called stabilization fund. 

She said the money will probably be used next year to paint the 

deteriorating exterior of Town Hall. Angelo Perna also spoke in 

favor of the fund "because you never know when someone's going to 

go after it." 

Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 19 

To hear and act on the reports of the Town Meeting's standing 
Committees and to continue such Committees as the Town may vote 
to continue. 

William Varrell moved the Commuter Rail Committee be continued. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Kenneth Savoie read a report of the School Building Needs Commit- 
tee and moved to continue the committee. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

Paul McGinley read a report of the Historic District Study 
Committee and asked the report be accepted and moved to continue 
the committee. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Terri Stephens read a report of the Hall Haskell House Committee, 
thanked everyone for their generosity and support and moved to 
continue the committee. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Leslie Brooks reported on the Master Plan Commission and moved to 
continue the commission. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to accept the provisions of 
Section 22F of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, which statute 
authorizes local officials to set fees and charges; (2) to amend 
the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich by deleting the 
following sections thereof: 

-25- 



Chapter Section 

XV 5 (f) Dog Fees 

XV 15 Keeping. Storage, Manufacture or 

Sale of Flammables, Explosives 
XV 16 Fees Payable to Sealer of Weights 

and Measures ; 

(3) to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER 
IV GENERAL PROVISIONS ON BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND OFFICERS, Section 
7. Establishment of Fees , by adding a third sentence thereto: 

"With respect to the adoption of a new fee and/or amendment to an 
existing fee, in addition to the notice, hearing, and publication 
requirements in Section 6. Rules and Regulations and of any other 
law or by-law, the Board of Selectmen shall hold a second public 
hearing not less than six days nor more than sixty days following 
the first public hearing, prior to and condition precedent to the 
adoption of said fee."; 

(4) rescind the fee schedule adopted under section (1) of Article 
21 of the April 1, 1991, Annual Town Meeting; and (5) to amend 
the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich, SECTION XI. 
ADMINISTRATION , sub-section "D. Building Application and Permit 
Fees " by deleting said subsection in its entirety and by sub- 
stituting in lieu thereof the following subsection: 

"D. Building Application and Permit Fees . Before a building 
permit may be issued, a fee shall be paid to the Town on the 
basis of a schedule of fees established by the Board of Selectmen 
in accordance with the provisions of ' Section 7. Establishment of 
Fees ' of CHAPTER IV of the General By-Laws of the Town of 
Ipswich."; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to accept 
Article 20 as presented in the warrant for the April 6, 1992, 
Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Mr. McNally explained how this article would enable local offi- 
cials to set fees instead of waiting for town meeting vote. The 
process by which fees would be set — advertisement, public 
hearing, adoption, and advertisement as adopted — would remain 
the same. Fees schedules would no longer be capped at levels set 
by the Legislature in years past. 

David Warner and Daniel Cashman spoke against the article. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board unani- 
mously recommended. Voice vote was inconclusive. On a hand 
count, 112 in favor and 29 against. Motion passed 2/3 majority. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote, under the provisions of Section 21E 
of Chapter 4 of the General Laws, as amended, to amend the 
General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER IV "GENERAL 
PROVISIONS ON BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND OFFICERS," by adding a new 
Section 8 as follows: 



-26- 






" Section 8. Due Date for Payment of Municipal Charges and Bills 
and Rate of Interest for Unpaid Charges . The due date for the 
payment of bills and charges to the Town shall be thirty (30) 
days after the date appearing upon the bill or notice of charge 
The interest charge for any unpaid balance (s) shall be as speci- 
fied in Section 57 of Chapter 59 of the General Laws." ; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman William Walton moved that the Town vote to accept 
Article 21 as presented in the warrant for the April 6, 1992, 
Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended 
and urged support for Article 21. 
Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 2 2 

To see if the Town will vote to accept Conservation Areas A and 
B (Essex South District Registry of Deeds, Book 10971, Page 133) , 
with all restrictions and conditions therein, conveyed to the 
Town as part of the Appleton Estates Subdivision and containing 
12.876 acres and 6.1328 acres, respectively, to be subject to the 
care, custody and control by the Conservation Commission; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to accept 
Article 22 as presented in the warrant for the April 6, 1992, 
Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Conservation Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2 3 

To see if the Town will vote to accept, as town streets, the 
following ways: Belle Street and Circle Drive shown as indicated 
on the following plans: 

Belle Street: "Definitive Subdivision Plan of 'Linebrook Es- 
tates' Located in Ipswich, Massachusetts; Owner and Applicant 
Linebrook Estates Realty Trust, Francis L. & Lucille M. Doyon, 
Trustees, 299 Linebrook Road, Ipswich, Mass.; Thomas E. Neve 
Associates, Inc., Engineers - Surveyors - Land Use Planners, 447 
Old Boston Road - U.S. Route #1, Topsfield, Massachusetts - 
01983; Date: July 30, 1985, revised to: March 25, 1986; consist- 
ing of seven sheets as recorded at Essex South District Registry 
of Deeds, Plan Book 209, Plan 14; 

-27- 



Circle Drive: (formerly known as Fille Street Extension) "As- 
Built Plan, Fille Street Extension, Linebrook Estates II, Ips- 
wich, Massachusetts, prepared for Linebrook Estates Realty Trust; 
Date: November 15, 1991; Scale 1" = 20'; AA Associates Civil 
Engineers * Land Surveyors, 6 Burleigh Avenue, Ipswich, Mass. ; 
consisting of two sheets; and 

Circle Drive: (formerly known as Fille Street Extension) "Defini- 
tive Subdivision Plan of 'Linebrook Estates II' Located in 
Ipswich, Massachusetts; Owner and Applicant Linebrook Estates 
Realty Trust, Francis L. & Lucille M. Doyon, Trustees, 299 
Linebrook Road, Ipswich, Mass.; Thomas E. Neve Associates, Inc., 
Engineers - Surveyors - Land Use Planners, 447 Old Boston Road - 
U.S. Route #1, Topsfield, Massachusetts"; Date: February 10, 
1989, revised to: December 10, 1989; consisting of four sheets; 
as recorded at Essex South Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 258, Plan 
73; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

John Doyon moved that the Town accept Belle Street and Circle 
Drive as Town Roads, as described in Article 2 3 of the warrant 
for the April 6, 1992, Annual Town Meeting, with the Circle Drive 
plan being further clarified as "As-Built Plan, Circle Drive, 
Linebrook Estates II, Ipswich, Massachusetts, prepared for 
Linebrook Estates Realty Trust; Date: December 17, 1991; Scale 
1" = 20'; AA Associates Civil Engineers * Land Surveyors, 6 
Burleigh Avenue, Ipswich, Mass.; consisting of two sheets". 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and Planning Board unani- 
mously in favor. Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 2 4 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote taken under 
Article 14 of the October 21, 1985, Special Town Meeting by 
deleting the following sentence in its entirety: 

"The Commission shall be made up of two appointees each of the 
Board of Selectmen, the Planning Board, the Zoning Board of 
Appeals, the Conservation Commission, and the Historical Commis- 
sion and one appointee of the Finance Committee." ; 

and by substituting therefor the following sentence: 

"The Master Plan Commission shall be made up of two appointees 
each of the Board of Selectmen, the Planning Board, the Zoning 
Board of Appeals, the Conservation Commission, the Historical 
Commission, one appointee of the Finance Committee, and one 
appointee of the Ipswich Housing Authority."; or take any other 
action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Director of the Ipswich Housing Authority Catherine Cecil moved 
that the Town vote to amend Article 24 as presented in the 

-28- 



warrant for the April 6, 1992, Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Miss Cecil said the Ipswich Housing Authority has expressed a 
desire to have one designee appointed by them, so as to provide 
input to the commission on the supply and demand for housing in 
the Town . 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Planning Board and Master Plan Commission unanimously in favor. 
Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 2 5 

To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
to exercise good faith efforts (1) to reduce the maximum legal 
speed in the "downtown area" by 5 m.p.h.; and (2) to establish a 
20 m.p.h. speed limit starting at Town Hall going over the Choate 
Bridge, past the Fire Station and Winthrop School; both for 
safety reasons; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(By Petition) 

Angelo Perna moved that the Town vote to accept Article 2 5 as 
presented in the warrant for the April 6, 1992, Annual Town 
Meeting. Seconded. 

After explaining Article 25, Mr. Perna moved that action on this 
article be postponed indefinitely. Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 2 6 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to instruct the Board of Select- 
men to exercise good faith efforts to petition the applicable 
authorities of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to reduce the 
existing speed limits by 5 m.p.h. on High Street starting at the 
intersection of Mile Lane, past the shopping center, past the 
Ipswich High School and over the railway bridge; and (2) to 
convey to the Board of Selectmen the need to reduce the speed on 
this portion of High Street for safety reasons; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Angelo Perna moved that the Town vote to accept Article 2 6 as 
presented in the warrant for the April 6, 1992, Annual Town 
Meeting.' Seconded. 

After explaining Article 26, Mr. Perna moved that action on this 
article be postponed indefinitely. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2 7 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to give a vote of confidence to 
the volunteer efforts of the many citizens who have greatly 
helped to improve the conditions of the Memorial Building over 



-29- 



the past several years; and (2) to instruct the Board of Select- 
men that it is the Town Manager's responsibility for maintenance 
and repair of all Town buildings; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Angelo Perna moved that the Town vote to give a vote of confi- 
dence to the volunteer efforts of the many citizens who have 
greatly helped to improve the conditions of the Memorial Building 
over the past several years. Seconded. 

After explaining Article 27, Mr. Perna moved that action on this 
article be postponed indefinitely. Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 28 

To see if the Town will vote to instruct the School Committee to 
support the volunteer efforts of Angelo C. Perna and volunteers 
in leveling and grading the so-called "Foster Way" property for 
playing fields; (2) to authorize the School Committee to remove, 
store, or sell excess fill; and (3) to transfer $5,000 from the 
Electric Light Dept. surplus for the purpose of paying for 
materials for new utility lines into the Ipswich High School; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Angelo Perna moved that the Town vote (1) to instruct the School 
Committee to support the volunteer efforts of Angelo C. Perna and 
his volunteers in leveling and grading the Foster Way property 
for playing fields; (2) to authorize the School Committee to 
remove, store, or sell excess fill. Seconded. 

Mr. Perna gave a report on the progress of the playing field. 
School Committee and Board of Selectmen recommended indefinite 
postponement. Finance Committee had no recommendation. Cynthia 
Quinn, chairman of the School Committee explained a number of 
issues involved before work could proceed. No plans had been 
received to date. 

A motion to move the question was seconded and carried unanimous- 
ly. Main motion carried by majority voice vote to postpone. 



ARTICLE 2 9 

To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen 
and the School Committee to grant NO RAISES (zero percent) , to 
any and all of the Town's municipal and school employees without 
exception, for Fiscal Year 1993, from July 1992 to June 1993; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Angelo Perna moved to accept Article 29 as presented in the 
warrant for the April 6, 1992, Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, School Committee and Finance Committee 
recommended against Article 29 unanimously. 

-30- 



Rev. Bruce Arbour rejected this article and moved for indefinite 

postponement. Seconded. 

David Warner asked when average citizens get a chance to question 

salaries. Selectman James Engel answered through the budget 

process. 

Motion to postpone carried by simple majority voice vote. 



ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to instruct the School Committee 
not to vote in favor of "SCHOOL CHOICE" for the school year 1992- 
1993; and (2) to let our legislators know the disservice that 
this law has had on education and athletics in Ipswich and 
surrounding communities; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (By Petition) 

Angelo Perna moved that the Town accept Article 3 as presented 
in the warrant for the April 6, 1992, Annual Town Meeting. 
Seconded. Motion failed to carry. 



ARTICLE 31 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the following proposal as 
a change in the Town By-Laws. 

"No Town Committee shall have the authority to affect the member- 
ship of any other Town Committee or seek to exercise control over 
any other Town Committee by any means whatsoever."; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

The last three articles were submitted by Robert J. Willis, Jr. 

Selectman James Engel moved that action on this article be 
postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 
Motion carried by majority voice vote. 



ARTICLE 3 2 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the 
Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER IV GENERAL PROVISIONS ON BOARDS, COMMIT- 
TEES, AND OFFICERS" by adding a new Section 8 thereto as 
follows: 

" Section 8. Qualifications for Membership on the School 
Committee 

No person shall be eligible to serve on the School Committee 
whose education, background and/or educational experience in- 
cludes any of the following criteria, activity, and/or accom- 
plishments: 



-31- 



(a) Attended or received a degree from any college of education; 

(b) Is or has ever been certified as a teacher, or has sought 
certification as such; 

(c) Is or has ever been employed as a teacher and/or an adminis- 
trator in any public school, private school, and/or school 
system; 

(d) Is or has ever been employed by a school or school system in 
any capacity; such as a consultant, advisor, curriculum advisor, 
librarian, etc. ; and/or 

(e) Who received any income derived from any funds expended for 
either public or private educational purposes; including building 
and maintenance contractors and their employees; food service 
contractors and their employees; the owners, managers and employ- 
ees of any company or group which sells services and/or materials 
that are commonly used in the course of operating a school 
system."; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By 
Petition) 

Selectman James Engel moved that action on this article be 
postponed indefinitely. Seconded. Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 3 3 

To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court to 
adopt a Special Act amending "SECTION 5. Other Elective Boards 
and Offices ." of Chapter 620, Acts of 1966 (known as the Town's 
Charter) to provide that the seven members of the School Commit- 
tee shall be appointed by the Board of Selectmen, in the same 
staggered sequence they were formerly elected, instead of having 
the members elected by the registered voters, said Special Act to 
contain substantially the following provisions: 

" Appointment of the School Committee by the Board of Selectmen 

(A) The Board of Selectmen shall appoint all members of the 
School Committee from those interested residents of the Town who: 

1) have never earned any income as an administrator or teacher 
in any school system, either public or private; and 

2) do not have a degree from any college of education and have 
never sought certification, or have never been certified, as an 
educator. 

(B) Such School Committee shall have the same number of members 
as the present School Committee. The Superintendent of Schools 
and the principals of all the schools shall be ex-of f icio members 
of the School Committee, and shall serve in an advisory capacity 
only, with no voting rights whatsoever, including the right to 
vote on any budget item and/ or whenever the expenditure of funds 
is involved. 

-32- 



(C) The Board of Selectmen shall immediately begin a selection 
process for potential School Committee members who meet the above 
criteria and shall appoint seven so selected on or before July 1, 
1992. The term of all School Committee members shall be for three 
years with initial terms staggered into one, two and three year 
terms in order to avoid complete replacement and to assure 
continuity. 

(D) No member shall serve more than the equivalent of two three 
year terms, or a maximum of six (6) consecutive years. 

(E) All of the authority, duties and responsibilities of the 
present School Committee shall pass to the newly appointed School 
Committee on July 1, 1992. The present School Committee shall not 
commit the Town to any expenditures of funds other than those 
approved at the April 1992 Annual Town Meeting."; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Selectman James Engel moved that action on this article be 
postponed indefinitely. Seconded. Motion carried by majority 
voice vote. 



ARTICLE 34 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous 
articles raising and/or appropriating money contained in this 
warrant for the purpose of completing a budget which is balanced 
and in compliance with the levy limit provisions of Proposition 
2%, so called; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that action on this article be 
postponed indefinitely. Seconded. Motion carried by majority 
voice vote. 

Motion to adjourn the Annual Town Meeting was seconded and 
passed. Moderator James Grimes thanked everyone for staying to 
complete the meeting. He announced the Special Town Meeting to 
be held Saturday, October 17, 1992. Meeting was adjourned at 
11:42 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up 
attested copies thereof at the Post Office and at each of the 
meeting houses in the Town, by publication at least seven days 
prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper 
published in, or having a general circulation in, the Town of 
Ipswich. 






-33- 



Given unto our hands this second day of March in the year of 
our Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-Two. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James R. Engel 
William E. George 
Patrick J. McNally 
William I. Walton 
Charles J. Wayne 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby 

directed to notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, 

qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet in the IPSWICH HIGH 

SCHOOL, in said Ipswich, on MONDAY, THE TWENTY-SEVENTH DAY OF 

JULY, 1992, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act 

on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the meeting to order at 7:40 P.M. 
with 356 voters present. The final count was 527 at 9 P.M. 
Following the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag, the Moderator 
explained the method of presenting amendments to the warrant 
articles and answered some procedural questions. It was moved, 
seconded and so voted to admit the non-voters. Tellers appointed 
by the Moderator were David Pauley, Lawrence Seidler, Richard 
Thompson, Joseph Rogers and Margot Sherwood. 



ARTICLE ONE 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By- 
Law of the Town of Ipswich, " SECTION II. APPLICABILITY B. Noncon- 
forming Structures and Uses." by adding the following paragraph 
after the first paragraph in said subsection: 

"In the case of a building, structure or use of land destroyed or 
damaged by fire, explosion, or other catastrophe, such building, 
structure or use of land may be restored or rebuilt at the same 
location and again used as previously, provided that in rebuild- 
ing it shall be made to conform to this By-Law so far as practi- 
cable; and further provided that such rebuilding or restoring 
shall be completed within two (2) years after such catastrophe. 
It is further provided that the building or structure or use of 
land as restored shall be no greater in floor or land area than 
the original building or structure unless permitted by the Zoning 

-34- 



Board of Appeals under the provisions of this Section." ; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board member John Beagan moved that the Town vote to 
amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich, 
" SECTION II. APPLICABILITY B. Nonconforming Structures and Uses." 
by adding the following paragraph after the first paragraph in 
said subsection: 

"Notwithstanding the provisions of the first paragraph of this 
section, in the case of a building, structure or use of land 
destroyed or damaged by fire, explosion, or other catastrophe, 
such building, structure or use of land may be restored or 
rebuilt as of right at the same location and again used as 
previously, provided that in rebuilding it shall be made to 
conform to this By-Law so far as practicable; and further provid- 
ed that such rebuilding or restoring shall be completed within 
two (2) years after such catastrophe. It is further provided 
that the building or structure or use of land as restored shall 
be no greater in floor or land area than the original building or 
structure unless permitted by a special permit issued by the 
Zoning Board of Appeals under the provisions of the first para- 
graph of this Section." Seconded. 

Mr. Beagan explained the article and why it was so important to 
amend this section of the Zoning By-Law. The amendment would 
simply restore wording that was apparently omitted when the 
Zoning By-Law was significantly rewritten in 1977. The Planning 
Board consisting of three members at the present time were all in 
favor, the Board of Selectmen were unanimously in favor and the 
Finance Committee voted five in favor and three opposed. 

Real Estate Appraiser Charles Metrakas moved to amend the main 
motion and after some discussion, withdrew the motion. 

Finance Committee member Geoffrey Hunt moved that the motion to 
amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich "Sec- 
tion II. Applicability B. Non-Conforming Structures and Uses" be 
amended as follows: 

"building, structure, or use of land" should instead read 
"residential - single, two-family or multi-family building, 
structure or use of land or commercial building, structure or use 
of land utilized for the purposes of retailing food, beverages, 
clothing, sporting equipment, pharmaceutical, health and beauty 
aids, jewelry and other personal effects, reading and other 
leisure materials, furniture, novelties and housewares and for 
the purpose of general office activities." Seconded. 

Mr. Hunt objected to the wording in the main motion and said his 
motion would have allowed residential and commercial properties 
to be rebuilt if destroyed, but not industrial properties. He 
wanted to set up a review system so industries that may be 
polluters could be checked carefully when they attempted to 
rebuild. 






-35- 



Robert McNeil, owner of the Ipswich Ford Company, recommended 
against Mr. Hunt's amendment saying he didn't want to lose his 
job or the jobs of others because his company couldn't rebuild 
after a fire. 

Lee Wheeler came forward to offer an amendment, but instead asked 
for support for Mr. Hunt's amendment. 

Mr. Hunt moved a second amendment: 

"floor or" should be removed and "total structural volume or 
overall height" be inserted after "land area." Seconded. 
The Planning Board was in favor, the Board of Selectmen voted two 
in favor and three against and the Finance Committee voted five 
in favor and three against the second amendment. 

Finance Committee Chairman Jamie Fay was concerned about the 
legality of the amendments. He said the whole by-law change 
could be thrown out if the amendments were rejected by the 
Attorney General. 

The Moderator introduced the new Town Counsel, Barbara Saint 
Andre, who said the amendment would pass muster with the Attorney 
General. 

On a hand count, the second amendment failed to pass with 11 for 
and 443 against. 

On another hand count, the first amendment failed to pass with 16 
for and 426 against. 

Leo Hanrahan opposed the 2 year limit in the main motion. 
Bill Wasserman moved to strike the 2 year limit. Seconded. 
After Planning Board Chairman Leslie Brooks explained that the 2 
year limit was in the original by-law, Wasserman' s motion was 
withdrawn. 

Stephen DeBellis asked when the clock started toward the 2 year 
period. Building Inspector Allen Fraser said "from the date of 
the catastrophe." 

Alice Moscarillo was concerned about rebuilding and restoring her 
historical home in this 2 year time frame. 

Bill Wasserman then moved to amend the main motion by replacing 
"substantially underway" for "completed." Seconded. 

Pat Hagadorn recommended keeping the 2 year limit and Building 

Inspector Allen Fraser said he would go along with "substantially 

underway" and would send them to the Zoning Board of Appeals for 

a special permit to complete. 

Selectman James Engel was opposed to all the amendments and was 

in favor of the main motion. 

The question was moved, seconded and carried on a unanimous voice 

vote. 



-36- 



Wasserman's amendment failed on a hand count with 47 in favor and 
377 against. 

The question was moved, seconded and carried on a majority voice 
vote. 

On a hand count, the main motion passed with 444 in favor and 4 
against. 



ARTICLE TWO 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the School Committee 
to enter into a lease-purchase agreement, for a duration of two 
or more fiscal years, for the acquisition of a new gas heating 
system for the Payne School; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 



School Committee Member Lawrence Seidler moved that the Town vote 
under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 40, Section 4, as 
amended, to authorize the School Committee to enter into a lease- 
purchase agreement, for a duration of two or more fiscal years, 
subject to annual appropriations, for the acquisition of a new 
gas heating system for the Payne School. Seconded. 

Mr. Seidler said the conversion from electric to gas heat at the 
administrative offices would offer significant future savings. 
The Board of Selectmen, School Committee and Finance Committee 
were unanimously in favor. 
Motion carried by a unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE THREE 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the School Committee 
to establish a revolving fund account for school transportation 
user fees; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee Member David Pauley moved that action under this 
article be postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE FOUR 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to cover the Town's share of the ensuing year's annual 
operating, debt service, and capital outlay expenses of the 
Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District; and 
to offset said appropriation by transferring a sum of money from 
the stabilization fund for said purposes; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 






-37- 



School Committee Chairman Cynthia Quinn moved that the Town vote 
(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $117,010 and $34,693, to 
cover the Town's share of the ensuing year's annual operating and 
debt service expenses, and the Town's share of capital outlay, 
respectively, of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High 
School District; and (2) to offset this appropriation, the sum of 
$151,703 be appropriated and transferred from the stabilization 
fund for said purposes. Seconded. 

Mrs. Quinn explained the motion and recommended a vote to ap- 
prove. 

The School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
were unanimously in favor. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

Motion to adjourn the meeting, seconded at 9 P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up 
attested copies thereof at the Post Office and at each of the 
meeting houses in the Town, by publication at least fourteen days 
prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper 
published in, or having a general circulation in, the Town of 
Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this Twenty-Ninth day of June in the year of 
our Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-Two. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Charles J. Wayne 
Patrick J. McNally 
William E. George 



James R. Engel 

Weymouth M. Atkinson, Jr. 



-38- 



1992 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby 

directed to notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, 

qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet in the IPSWICH HIGH 

SCHOOL, in said Ipswich, on SATURDAY, THE SEVENTEENTH OF OCTOBER, 

1992, at 9:00 o'clock in the morning, then and there to act on the 

following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the first Saturday special town 
meeting to order at 9:35 a.m. with 211 voters present. The final 
count was 242 at 10:00 a.m. Selectman Charles Wayne led the Pledge 
of Allegiance to the flag. 

It was moved, seconded and so voted to admit non-voters. Tellers 
appointed by the Moderator were Stephanie Bouzianis, Beverly Perna, 
Angelo Perna, William Walton and David Warner. 



ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 4 of the April 6, 1992, Annual Town Meeting (the FY 1993 
municipal operating budget) by: (1) consolidating the four separate 
line items in "Unclassified-Benefits" to one line-item total which 
shall remain the same as previously appropriated; (2) consolidating 
the eight categories in the Sewer division budget by combining 
"Salaries and Wages" with "Benefits" (the new category to be 
labeled "Salaries and Wages") , and by combining into one "Expense" 
category the lines "Consultants", "Insurance", "Interest and Debt 
Payment", and "Expenses", the total appropriation for the Sewer 
Division remaining the same as previously appropriated; and (3) 
consolidating the four categories in the Legal budget to one 
category labeled "Expenses", the total appropriation to remain the 
same as previously appropriated; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town amend its action taken 
under Article 4 of the April 06, 1992, Annual Town Meeting by 
consolidating the four categories in the Legal budget to one 
category labeled "Expenses", the total appropriation to remain 
the same as previously appropriated. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 

-39- 






for the minimum price of One ($1.00) Dollar to convey an "all 
purpose" permanent easement to the First and South Congregational 
Church of Ipswich, described as follows: 

A certain easement area of land in the Town of Ipswich, Essex 
County, Massachusetts, located on land now or formerly of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, enclosed within North Main 
Street and Meeting House Green and more particularly described 
as follows: 

"Beginning at a point S41° 23' 30" E, 12.25 feet from a concrete 
bound set at the northwesterly corner of a parcel of land now or 
formerly of The First and South Congregational Church of Ipswich; 
thence, running S41° 23' 30" E, 7.00 feet by land now or formerly 
of said First and South Congregational Church of Ipswich, to a 
point; thence, turning and running N 48° 36' 30" E, 7.00 feet over 
land now or formerly of the Town of Ipswich to a point; thence, 
turning and running N41° 23' 30" W, 7.00 feet over land now or for- 
merly of the Town of Ipswich to a point; thence, turning and run- 
ning S48° 36' 30" W, 7.00 feet over land now or formerly of said 
Town of Ipswich to the point of beginning. Said easement area 
containing forty-nine (49) square feet of land, more or less. 

The land of said First and South Congregational Church of Ipswich 
is that described in Essex South Registry of Deeds Book 5556, 
Page 753, conveyed by the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich by a 
majority of its Board of Selectmen on September 11, 1968, and also 
being shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Ipswich; Scale 
1" = 30'; Revised: February 27, 1968; prepared by Essex Survey 
Service, 275 Cabot Street, Beverly, Massachusetts"; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Robert Cram moved that the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
for a minimum purchase price of One ($1.00) Dollar to convey an 
"all purpose" easement to the First and South Congregational Church 
of Ipswich, as described in Article 2 of the warrant for the 
October 17, 1992, special town meeting. Seconded. 

After correcting the motion to include the dollar amount, Mr. Cram 
said this easement over town land to the First and South 
Congregational Church of Ipswich would accommodate an emergency 
fire exit for preschool students. Board of Selectmen and Finance 
Committee unanimously in favor. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote. 



ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law 
of the Town of Ipswich 

(1) by amending " SECTION IV. ZONING DISTRICTS A. Type of 
Districts . " by inserting a new number "6" as follows: "6. Highway 
Business (HB) District" and by renumbering the existing paragraphs 



-40- 





-41- 



"6." through "12." inclusive as "7." through "13."; by amending 
" SECTION IV. ZONING DISTRICTS B. Intent of Districts ." by 
inserting a new number "4." as follows: 

"4. The Highway Business District is intended primarily for retail, 
trade, service, and other commercial uses; multi-family residential 
uses at a density defined by this By-Law may also be permitted by 
Special Permit. The District is generally served by municipal 
water supply but is only partially served by sewerage facilities."; 

and by renumbering existing paragraphs "4." through "9." as 
"5." through "10.", respectively; and 

(2) by amending SECTION V. USE REGULATIONS D. Table of Use 
Regulations , within said Table under the heading " DISTRICT " by 
inserting a new column "HB" between the columns labeled "B" and 
"PC" and by assigning to this new HB column the same use allowances 
and use prohibitions as designated under the existing column 
entitled "B". ; and 

(3) by amending " SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS 
B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations ." by inserting 
within said Table the term "Highway Business" before the term 
"Business" and by assigning the following dimensional and density 
values to "Highway Business" within said Table: 



Use 



Min.Lot Min.Lot Min.Lot Min. Yard 
Area 



Max. Min. 
Bldg Open 



Width Frontage Front Side Rear Area Space 



Multi- 25,000 
family 2,500/DU 



150 



100 



65 



2 5* 



25 



30 



50 



All 
Other 
Permit- 
ted Uses 



20,000 



150 



100 



65 



16 



2 5 : 



25 



40 



15 



and by adding a new footnote "16." to said Table as follows: 

"16. Exclusive of access and/or egress points from the site, the 
first twenty (20') feet of the front yard setback as measured from 
the streetline, as defined by this By-Law, shall be landscaped with 
plant materials and shall have one tree for each twenty-five (25') 
feet of frontage. At the time of planting, each tree shall have at 
least a three and one-half (3%") inches trunk caliper, measured at 
a point thirty-six (36") inches above the root ball. The spacing of 
the trees shall be at the discretion of the developer but shall not 
be of a manner which reduces visibility at points of access or 
egress from the site. 

Further, the required twenty-foot (20') landscaped portion of the 
front yard setback shall also contain an arrangement of plantings, 
shrubbery, or evergreen materials which, within two (2) years of 



-42- 



planting, shall attain a height of at least thirty-six (36") 
inches. The line of planted materials shall be located at least ten 
(10') feet from the street line, but not necessarily in a straight 
row. Further, they shall be placed and maintained so as not to 
impede safe access to and/or egress from the site. At the 
discretion of the developer, the plan for the landscaping in the 
required twenty (20') foot front yard setback may include fencing, 
earth berms, and/or stone walls. These materials and landscaping 
devices may substitute for all or some of the arrangement of 
plantings noted above; not including trees. In all instances, 
however, the height of any fences, berms, and/or walls shall not 
exceed a height of thirty-six (36") inches above finished grade 
and shall be designed and located as not to impede safe access to 
or egress from the site, and shall be at least ten (10') feet from 
the street line, but not necessarily in a straight row. 

All other surface areas of the landscaped portion of the front yard 
setback shall be planted with a ground cover, grass, or mulching, 
where appropriate."; and 

(4) by amending the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich 
by changing the following area to Highway Business (HB) District: 

The part of the existing Business District generally situated in 
the area of High Street which begins approximately one thousand 
feet southerly from the intersection of High Street with Paradise 
Road and Mile Lane and having a width of approximately three 
hundred (300') feet on each side of the center line of High Street, 
and ends on the northern side of High Street approximately one 
hundred (100') feet the intersection of Currier Park and High 
Street and on the sourtherly side at the intersection of High 
Street and Currier Park. 

The above-described business-zoned area is further described as 
including all or portions of the following lots (Assessors' Maps 
dated January 01, 1991) : 

Assessor's Map 3 0B - lots 8,3,4,5, 5A; 

Assessor's Map 30A - lots 28, 27, 26A, 20, 2, 3, 4, 8B, 8D, 9, 

8C, 10A, 11, 11A, 11B, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16; 

Assessor's Map 21 - lots 7A, 11, 12, 12A, 13; 

Assessor's Map 2 0D - lot 1; and as shown on the attached map, and 

by changing the following area to Highway Business (HB) District: 
The part of the existing Business District generally generally 
situated approximately one thousand two hundred (1,200') , more or 
less, east of the intersection of Essex Road and County Road and 
extending approximately seven hundred fifty (750') feet north and 
easterly, more or less, from said intersection at its point of 
greatest width. 






-43- 



The above-described business-zoned area is further described as 
including all or portions of the following lots (Assessors' Maps 
dated January 01, 1991) : 

Assessor's Map 54C - lot 22A 

Assessor's Map 54A - lots 6, 1 , 8, 9, 10, 10A, 12, 12A, 12B, 13, 

14, 14A, 38A; and as shown on the attached 
map; 

both of which map amendments are on file in the office of 
the Town Clerk and the office of the Planning Board; and 

(5) by amending " SECTION VII. OFF-STREET PARKING REGULATIONS ", 
"L. Parking and Loading Layout ." paragraph 5. by deleting the 
opening phrase of the first sentence thereof, which reads as 
follows "Except in the Industrial and the Limited Industrial 
District" and by inserting in lieu thereof the following: 
"Except in the Industrial, Limited Industrial, and Highway 
Business District..."; and by deleting the first word of the 
second sentence thereof ("However") and by substituting in 

lieu thereof the following word "Additionally..."; 

(6) by amending "SECTION VIII. SIGNS", Subsection "D. Sign 
Requirements by District " , paragraph "1." by deleting the 

first clause which reads "In Rural Residence A, B, C and Intown 
Residence Districts..." and by substituting in lieu thereof 
the following: "In Rural Residence A, B, and C; Intown Residence; 
and Highway Business Districts..."; and paragraph "3" by deleting 
the first clause in its entirety and by substituting in lieu 
thereof the following: "In Highway Business, Planned Commercial, 
and Business Districts, but not including those Business Districts 
covered in paragraph 4 below, the following signs are permitted:"; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Chairman Leslie Brooks moved that the Town amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as presented in 
Article 3 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town 
meeting, with the following change to the zoning map outlining the 
boundaries of the Highway Business District: 

delete the description of the first portion of the district, as it: 
appears in the (4) fourth section of this article, and insert in 
lieu thereof the following description: 

"The part of the existing Business District generally situated in 
the area of High Street which begins approximately one thousand 
feet southerly from the intersection of High Street with Paradise 
Road and Mile Lane and having a width of approximately three 
hundred (300') feet on each side of the center line of High Street, 
and ends on the northerly side of High Street approximately one 
hundred (100') feet north of the intersection of Currier Park and 
High Street and on the southerly side at the intersection of High 1 
Street and Kimball Avenue" and further, by amending VII L.5 by 

-44- 



adding the following sentence after the first sentence in said 
section ie. "However in the Highway Business (HB) District the 
number of off-street parking spaces allowed in the front yard shall 
not exceed fifty (50%) percent of the total off-street parking 
spaces required by this by-law. (This amendment is referenced in 
(5) in Article 3) . Seconded. 

Ms. Brooks explained the motion and the amendment to the motion. 
Board of Selectmen unanimously in favor. Selectman Pat McNally 
also stated that this was part of the Master Plan Commission's long 
term growth plan. The Finance Committee voted 7-1 to indefinitely 
postpone this article. Finance Committee Chairman Jamie Fay said 
the committee was not against the concept but wanted more time to 
re-think this issue and get it right. He moved to indefinitely 
postpone this article which was seconded. Pat McNally and Leslie 
Brooks spoke against indefinite postponement while John Bruni and 
Jim Baker spoke for postponement. Several questions by Carl 
Gardner, David Warner and Wendy White concerning split lots, back 
lots, set backs, residential use and wetlands were answered by 
Leslie Brooks and Pat McNally. A motion to move the question was 
seconded and defeated by a two-thirds voice vote. Under further 
discussion, several residents still had questions concerning 
traffic and density. Mr. Connery, consultant to the Planning 
Board, was allowed to clarify these issues. Jamie Fay still had a 
problem with high density residential use in this area and urged 
indefinite postponement. The motion to indefinitely postpone 
failed to pass. On a handcount with 116 in favor and 79 against, 
the main motion failed to pass. (130 needed to pass) 



ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law 
of the Town of Ipswich as follows: 

(1) by deleting SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS 
Subsection " F. Accessory Building Requirements." in its entirety 
and by substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

" F. Requirements for Accessory Buildings and Structures: By Special 
Permit of the Zoning Board of Appeals accessory buildings and 
structures are permitted in the front yard in Rural Residence A, B, 
and C Districts. Accessory buildings and structures shall be 
located on the same lot as the principal building or use provided 
that not more than twenty-five (25) percent of a minimum lot area 
shall be so occupied and, further, that an accessory building 
shall not be located less than ten (10) feet from the principal 
building. An accessory building or structure may be located in 
accordance with the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations 
(Accessory Buildings and Structures) as noted hereinbelow. In the 
Rural Residence A, B, and C districts, the minimum front yard 
requirement of the district in which it is situated shall apply. 

By special permit of the Zoning of Appeals, in the Rural 



-45- 



Residence B District, accessory buildings and/or structures 

not in excess of one hundred twenty (120) square feet may be 

located not less than one-half the side and/or rear yard 

requirement (s) for accessory buildings or structures within the 

district. 

An accessory building or structure attached to its principal 
building shall be considered an integral part thereof."; and 

(2) by amending subsection "B. Table of Dimensional and Density 
Regulations" by including the following district categories with 
dimensional requirements: 

TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS 
(Accessory Buildings and Structures) 



District 



Front (1) (7) 



Minimum Yards 

Side (2) (7) Rear (2) (7) 



Rural Residence A&C 50 
(RRA,RRC) Accessory 
Buildings & Structures (17) 



20 



15 



Rural Residence B 10 

(RRB) Accessory 

Buildings & Structures (17) 



10(18) 



10(18) 



Intown Residence (IR) 
Accessory Buildings 
and Structures (17) 



20 



10 



Business (B) 
Accessory Buildings 
and Structures (17) 



35 



10 



Planned Commercial (PC) 50 (13) 
Accessory Buildings 
and Structures (17) 



12.5 (13) 



25 (13) 



Industrial (I) 
Accessory Buildings 
and Structures (17) 



50 (6) 



12.5 



25 



Limited Industrial (LI) 50 (14,15) 
Accessory buildings 
and Structures (17) 



12.5 (14) 



25 (14) 

"; and 



(3) by adding a new footnote "17" to "B. Table of Dimensional and 



-46- 



Density Regulations" as follows: 

"17. The following shall be exempt from the provisions of this 
Section: mailboxes, yard light-posts, flagpoles, birdhouses, 
retaining walls, fences, arbors, trellises, signs, sculptures, 
permanently affixed playground and picnic equipment, driveways, 
sidewalks, clotheslines, clothespoles, and landscaping features." 
; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Member Wayne King moved that the Town amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as presented in 
Article 4 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town 
meeting. Seconded. 

Mr. King gave a brief explanation of the article. Board of 
Selectmen unanimously in favor. Finance Committee agreed with the 
Planning Board and unanimously recommended the article. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law 
of the Town of Ipswich, " SECTION XI. ADMINISTRATION B. Permits, 
Certificate Required .", by adding a new fifth paragraph thereto 
as follows: 

"In interpreting the provisions of this By-Law relative to an 
application for a specific permit or certificate, the Building 
Inspector shall consider the provisions applicable on the date 
of application, except that: no permit for a building or structure 
for a use not previously acted upon and no Certificate of Occupancy 
shall be issued by the Building Inspector, if at the time of 
application for said permit or Certificate, there has been 
published by the Planning Board, as prescribed by law, notice of a 
public hearing to consider an amendment to this By-Law at a town 
meeting to be held within one hundred eighty (180) days of the 
date of said notice, and if the proposed building, structure or 
use would be in violation of said proposed amendment." or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Member Tim Perkins moved that the Town amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as presented in 
Article 5 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town 
meeting. Seconded. 

Mr. Perkins explained that passing this amendment would re-affirm 
a 1990 town meeting vote. Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law 






-47- 



of the Town of Ipswich SECTION III. DEFINITIONS by 

a) deleting the definition "ACCESSORY" in its entirety and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following definitions: 

"ACCESSORY USE: as applied to buildings and structures, a use 
which is customarily incidental to and subordinate to a legally 
existing principal use on the same lot." 

"ACCESSORY STRUCTURE: A Structure which houses or is used for 
something other than an allowed principal use."; and 

b) deleting the definition "BUILDING AREA" in its entirety; and 

c) deleting the definition "BUILDING HEIGHT" and by substituting in 
lieu thereof the following definition: 

"BUILDING HEIGHT: the vertical distance measured from the average 
existing grade to the highest point of the roof excluding 
standpipes, spires, domes, steeples, radio and radar towers, 
chimneys, broadcasting and television antennae, bulkheads, cooling 
towers, ventilators, and other appurtenances usually carried 
above the roof if not for human occupancy."; and 

d) by deleting Diagram # 1 in its entirety; and 

e) deleting the definition "DWELLING, MULTI-FAMILY" in its entirety 
and by substituting in lieu thereof the following definition: 

"DWELLING, MULTI-FAMILY: a building designed as, and/or containing 
three (3) or more dwelling units." ; and 

f) deleting the definition "DWELLING, SINGLE-FAMILY ATTACHED" in 
its entirety and by substituting in lieu thereof the following 
definition: 

"DWELLING, SINGLE-FAMILY ATTACHED: a building designed as, and/or 
containing two or more independent dwelling units separated by 
one or more common walls but with no common spaces within the 
building and no portion of any unit above or below any portion of 
another unit." ; and 

g) deleting the definition "DWELLING, TWO-FAMILY" in its entirety 
and by substituting in lieu thereof the following definition: 

"DWELLING, TWO-FAMILY: a building designed as, and/or containing 
two dwelling units, including two single family attached 
dwellings."; and 

h) by deleting the definition of "FAMILY" in its entirety; and 
i) deleting the definition "GROSS FLOOR AREA" in its entirety 



-48- 



and by substituting in lieu thereof the following definition: 

"FLOOR AREA: the aggregate gross area of all floors within a 
principal building excluding cellars, basements, garages, and 
attics not designed for human occupancy and excluding any area 
in accessory buildings." ; and 

j) deleting the definition "LOT" in its entirety and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following definition: 

"LOT: a single area of land in one ownership, within definite 
boundaries, used, or available for use, as the site for one or 
more buildings." ; and 

k) by inserting between the definitions "LOT FRONTAGE" 
and "LOT LINE, FRONT" the following new definition: 

"LOT LINE: a division line between adjoining properties, including 
the devision line between individual lots established by a plan 
filed in the registry of deeds; also includes 'street line'."; and 

1) deleting the definition "LOT WIDTH" in its entirety and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following definition: 

"LOT WIDTH: the distance between lot lines measured parallel to 
the front property line at the front setback."; and 

m) by deleting diagram #3; and 

n) by deleting the definition "MOBILE HOME" in its entirety; and 

o) by inserting between the definitions "LOT WIDTH" and 
"NON-CONFORMING USE" the following new definition: 

"MAXIMUM BUILDING AREA: the sum of the horizontal projection (s) 
of all buildings and parts thereof on the lot, excluding cornices, 
eaves, gutters, chimneys, open steps and bay/bow windows (not walk- 
out bays or floor cantilevers)."; and 

p) deleting the definition "NON-CONFORMING USE" in its entirety and 
by substituting in lieu thereof the following definition: 

"NON-CONFORMING USE: a use which conformed to all the applicable 
laws at the time of commencement, which, due to a change in zoning 
does not now conform to the provisions of this By-Law."; and 

q) by inserting between the definitions "SAFE YIELD" and 
"SIGN" the following new definition: 

"SETBACK: the minimum distance required between a structure and 
the specified lot line (front, side, rear)." ; and 

r) by deleting the definition of "STORY" in its entirety and by 

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substuting in lieu thereof the following definition: 

"STORY: That portion of a building between the upper surface of a 
floor and the upper surface of the floor or roof next above."; and 

s) deleting the definition "STREET LINE" in its entirety and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following definition: 

"STREET LINE: the property line separating the street from the 
lot." ; and 

t) deleting the definition "YARD, FRONT" in its entirety; and 

u) deleting the definition "YARD, REAR" in its entirety; and 

v) deleting the definition "YARD, SIDE" in its entirety; and 

w) deleting Diagram 5 in its entirety; and 

x) renumbering "Diagram 2" as "Diagram 1" (both its title and 
its reference in the definition of "LOT"; and 

y) renumbering "Diagram 4" as "Diagram 2" (both its title and 
its reference in the definition of "STORY"; 

or take any action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Member Wayne King moved that the Town amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as presented in 
Article 6 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town 
meeting. Seconded. 

Mr. King suggested changing these definitions in the by-laws was to 
make them conform to the building codes. Board of Selectmen and 
Finance Committee unanimously in favor. Motion carried by 
unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law 
of the Town of Ipswich by: 

a) deleting all references to the words "yard", "yard area", 
"yards", and "yard areas" (except where the word "yard" is used in 
conjunction with the words "junk", "salvage", and "cubic") 

as they appear in the following sections of the Zoning By-Law: 

SECTION III. DEFINITIONS "DWELLING, MULTI-FAMILY" 
SECTION III. DEFINITIONS "LOT WIDTH" * 
SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS : 
"A. Applicability of Dimensional and Density Regulations. " 
"B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations. " 

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( Table itself; footnotes, including footnote #16 if 

article 5 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992 

special town meeting passes) 
" C . Determination of Lot Areas. " 
"E. Screening Requirements. " 
"F. Accessory Building Requirements. " (not 

including reference to 'yard light-posts') 

"G. Other General Dimensional and Density Requirements. " 
(numbered Section "1.") 
SECTION VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS 

"L. Parking and Loading Layout. " (numbered section "5.") 
SECTION IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS 

"A. Open Space Preservation Zoning. " (numbered section "8.c") 



and 



b) replacing the words "yard" and "yard area" in each instance with 
the word "setback"; and 

c) replacing the words "yards" and "yard areas" in each instance 
with the word "setbacks"; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Planning Board Member Pat Hagadorn moved that the Town amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as presented in 
Article 7 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town 
meeting. Seconded. 

Ms. Hagadorn said this amendment would clarify and simplify the 
language in the by-law. Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
unanimously in favor. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law 
of the Town of Ipswich by deleting SECTION IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS. 
"A. Open Space Preservation Zoning." and by substituting in lieu 
thereof the following language: 

" A. Open Space Preservation (Cluster) Zoning (OSPZ) . 

1. Purpose: In order to encourage the conservation of significant 
open space in accordance with the Town of Ipswich Open Space and 
Recreation Plan and to encourage efficient use of land in harmony 
with the natural features in the RRA and RRC Districts, this bylaw 
shall allow, by special permit, an alternative to the standard 
subdivision permitted in residential districts by allowing a 
concentration of dwelling units without an increase in overall 
density. 

2. Permitted Uses: The following principal developed uses of the 
lots shall be permitted: 

single-family attached 



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single-family detached 

community uses 

religious uses 

educational uses 

membership club for the use of residents of the development 

country, fishing, tennis, boating, golf or similar club 

3. Density Standards: 

a. Minimum Tract Size: 

Open Space Preservation (Cluster) Zoning shall be permitted on a 
single tract of land, in one ownership with definitive boundaries 
ascertainable from a recorded deed or recorded plan, which has an 
area not less than five (5) times the minimum lot area of the 
zoning district within which it is situated. Existing public and 
private ways need not constitute boundaries of the tract but the 
area within such ways shall not be counted in determining tract 
size. Said tract shall be subject to the approval by the Planning 
Board under the Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of 
Land in the Town of Ipswich. 

b. Number of Lots: 

(1) Base Density: 
For the purposes of determining the total number of allowable 
dwelling units an entire tract, the total number of proposed 
dwelling units in the development shall not exceed the number of 
dwelling units which would be developed under normal application of 
one-acre zoning requirements under the "Town of Ipswich Rules and 
Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land" and in accordance 
with SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS of the 
"Protective Zoning By-law of the Town of Ipswich" . The developer 
shall provide a site plan with verifiable soil tests indicating the 
number of buildable lots possible under one-acre zoning and under 
the State Sanitary Code. Such soil tests shall be conducted as if 
they were actually percolation tests in accordance with the State 
Sanitary Code and shall be verified and attested to by a registered 
professional engineer. 

(2) Wetlands/Coastal Exclusion: 
For tracts which contain wetlands and/or floodplain, only one-half 
the area designated as wetlands and/or floodplain may be considered 
in the lot area calculations. For the purposes of determining lot 
area(s) the Federal Insurance Floodplain Maps (FIRM) and the Town 
of Ipswich General Wetlands By-law shall be used for determination 
of floodplain and wetlands calculations. 

(3) Maximum Density: 

In the RRC District in no circumstances shall the total number of 
units obtained through application of the above density formulae 
exceed one hundred twenty (120%) percent of the base density 
allowed under (1) above. In the RRA District in no circumstances 
shall the total number of units obtained through application of the 
above density formulae exceed one hundred (100%) percent of the 



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base density allowed under (1) above. In areas designated on the 
Town of Ipswich Zoning Map as Water Supply districts, the Board may 
require additional review to insure that septic systems are not 
unduly concentrated on the tract. 

4. Development Requirements: 

a. Town Water: The development shall be served by a water system 
deemed adequate for fire protection and domestic use by the Water 
Commissioners and by the Fire Chief. 

b. Sanitary Sewer/Septic: The property must be served 

by the Town's sanitary sewer system or by a private central 
sanitary sewer system. If, in the judgment of the Board, the 
topography and/or soil conditions are such that it would be more 
efficient to allow the underground common septic system or 
individual septic systems to be placed in the preserved open space, 
this shall be permitted. All systems are subject to the approval 
by the Board of Health and by any other permitting authority. 

c. Open Space Restriction: A minimum of twenty five (25) percent 
of the total parcel shall either be conveyed to the Town of Ipswich 
and accepted by it for open space use; or be conveyed to a non- 
profit corporation, the principal purpose of which is the 
conservation of open space; or be conveyed to a corporation or 
trust owned or to be owned by the or owners of the lots within the 
tract. If such a corporation or trust is utilized, ownership 
therein shall pass with the conveyances of the lots. In any case 
a conservation restriction prepared in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 31 and 33, inclusive, of Chapter 184 of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in a form 
suitable for execution by the Secretary of Environmental Affairs, 
enforceable by the Town, shall be recorded, and shall provide that 
such land shall be kept, in perpetuity, in an open or natural 
state, in accordance with the above-noted sections of Chapter 184 
of the General Laws. 

The Town of Ipswich, through this By-Law, encourages the use of the 
open space for agricultural use, conservation use and/or active 
recreational use such as playfields and tot lots. 

d. Dimensional Regulations: 

There shall be no minimum lot area, frontage or setback 
requirements within a tract, except as follows: 

(1) no building shall be erected within forty (40) feet of a 
public way or boundary line; 

(2) the area developed for residential use, including buildings, 
parking and other areas paved for vehicular use, shall not exceed 
thirty (30) percent of the total area of the OSPZ tract. Foot and 
bicycle paths and recreational facilities, including buildings 
wholly devoted to recreation, shall not be counted in the 






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calculation of the thirty (30%) percent limitation. 

(3) For each lot located within any minimum tract, the minimum lot 
width shall be 100 feet, the minimum lot frontage shall be 50 feet, 
the minimum front, side and rear setbacks shall be 20 feet, 20 feet 
(per side) and 30 feet, respectively, and the maximum building 
coverage shall be 20%. 

(4) The provisions of SECTION IX. which apply to the RRC district 
may be applied to any lot split between the RRC and RRA District at 
the time of the adoption of this section, including that portion of 
the lot falling within the RRA district. 

(5) Notwithstanding the requirements of SECTION X.B. of this By- 
law, within the RRC district any minimum tract proposed for the 
Open Space Preservation (cluster) Zoning shall be subject to site 
plan review in accordance with the provisions of SECTION X. 

(6) A minimum buffer of forty (40) feet shall be provided between 
the tract being built upon and other lots and, with the exception 
of any entry drive or street, a minimum buffer of fifty (50) feet 
shall be provided between the tract being built upon and the 
existing street. Where the tract being built upon is adjacent to 
permanent open space, such as Town, State, Federal or privately- 
restricted open space, a minimum buffer of thirty (30) feet shall 
be provided. 

The Planning Board may decrease or increase any buffer 
requirement if, after site review by the Board, the Board deems 
such action to be reasonable and appropriate. 

e. Construction of streets shall be in accordance with the Rules 
and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land in the Town of 
Ipswich. Streets may be offered for acceptance as public ways. 

f. Limitation of Subdivision: 

No lot shown on a plan for which a permit is granted under this 
section may be further subdivided, and a notation to this effect 
shall be shown on the plans. 

5. Adoption of Rules and Regulations: 

The Board shall adopt an application form and rules and regulations 
in accordance with the provisions of this by-law. 
Rules and regulations shall specify the application process, type 
and number of required plans, and general requirements in order to 
assist the developer in complying with the intent of this By-Law."; 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Chairman Leslie Brooks moved that the Town amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as presented in 
Article 8 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town 
meeting, with the following changes: 

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1) delete "SECTION IX. A. 4. b. Sanitary Sewer/Septic:" in its 
entirety and substitute in lieu thereof the following: 

"b. Sanitary Sewer/Septic: The property shall be served by the 
Town's sanitary sewer system, by a private central sanitary sewer 
system, or by individual septic systems. If, however, in the 
judgment of the Board, the topography and/or soil conditions are 
such that it would be more efficient to allow the underground 
common septic system or individual septic systems to be placed in 
the preserved open space, this configuration may be permitted. 
All systems are subject to approval by the Board of Health and 
any other permitting authority of competent jurisdiction." 

2) in "SECTION IX. A. 4. c. Open Space Restriction:" delete the 
word "or" where it appears in the fourth instance in the last 
clause of the first sentence, so that said clause, as amended, 
shall read as follows: 

"or be conveyed to a corporation or trust owned or to be owned 
by the owners of the lots within the tract." Seconded. 

Ms. Brooks said the proposed revisions to the Open Space By-law 
would make it easier to work with, less complicated and more 
appealing to a potential developer. Board of Selectmen recommended 
by a vote of 4-1. Finance Committee recommended by a vote of 6-1 
with one abstention. Finance Committee member Marion Swan reviewed 
the by-law thoroughly and said the amendment really clarifies the 
language. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law 
of the Town of Ipswich by adding to the present Section XI of said 
By-Law a new subsection "I", as follows, and by re-lettering the 
present subsections "I through "0" as "J" through "P": 

"I. Compliance with Zoning By-Law . The Board of Selectmen may at 
their reasonable discretion impose as an essential condition on 
the issuance and/or renewal of any permit and/or license which they 
are authorized to issue or renew, the requirement that there are 
and will be during the term, or terms, of such permit and/or 
license no violation (s) of the Protective Zoning By-Law conducted 
and/or permitted on the lot on which such permit or license is 
located by anyone, including, but not limited to, the Permittee or 
Licensee. In the event that any zoning violation (s) occurs on such 
lot as evidenced by the failure of compliance with any duly-served 
Cease and Desist Order, the Permittee or Licensee shall agree that 
any such .violation (s) may constitute just cause for the suspension 
or revocation of such permit or license. Such condition may be an 
essential element of the issuance and continued lawful existence of 
any such permit and/ or license. In the event that any owner of a 
lot on which a permit and/or license is located, or any Permittee 
or Licensee, aggrieved by an order or decision of the Building 
Inspector finding that a violation (s) of the Protective Zoning By- 



-55- 



Law exists on such lot is appealing the Building Inspector's order 
or decision in good faith to the Zoning Board of Appeals or to a 
court of competent jurisdiction, such order or decision shall not 
constitute the basis for the Board of Selectmen to refuse to renew, 
revoke, and/or suspend any such permit and/or license during the 
pendency of such good faith appeal."; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectman Weymouth Atkinson moved that the Town amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as presented in 
Article 9 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town 
meeting. Seconded. 

Mr. Atkinson said the Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended 
this article while the Finance Committee voted against it. Finance 
Committee Chairman Jamie Fay said the Board of Selectmen should not 
be enforcing the zoning by-laws. Zoning by-laws should be left to 
the zoning enforcement officer. Selectman James Engel explained 
why the article was essential to the Board and recommended in 
favor. On a handcount with 161 in favor and 3 against, the motion 
was passed. (127 needed to pass) 



ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning 
By-Law of the Town of Ipswich" SECTION V. USE REGULATIONS 
D . Table of Use Regulations . " by 

a) deleting the second paragraph thereof an by substituting in lieu 
thereof the following paragraph: 

"The processing, treating, and/or storing of volatile liquids, 
hazardous wastes, hazardous materials, and/or Class A, Class B, 
or Class C substances (other than heating fuel, diesel fuel, 
gasoline, and compressed gases) in quantities exceeding two 
hundred (200) gallons or one thousand (1000) pounds in dry weight 
shall not be permitted in any district." ; and 

b) deleting the fourth paragraph thereof and by substituting in 
lieu thereof the following paragraph: 

"Processing, treating, and/or storing of volatile liquids, 
hazardous wastes, hazardous materials and/or all Class A, Class B, 
or Class C substances (other than heating fuel, diesel fuel, 
gasoline, and compressed gases) in quantities less than two hundred 
(200) gallons or one thousand (1000) pounds in dry weight, provided 
no container exceeds fifty-five (55) gallons, shall be permitted in 
any district. Except for retail establishments storing inventory of 
five (5) gallons or less, uses shall be allowed only by special 
permit issued by the Planning Board. As a condition of a special 
permit, all uses shall be monitored by an inventory system for all 
incoming and outgoing material. In the event a special permit is 
issued under SECTION IX. C. of this By-Law, the applicant shall not 

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be required to obtain a separate special permit from the Zoning 
Board of Appeals for the treatment or storage of hazardous or 
toxic materials pursuant to the provisions of SECTION V. D. " ; and 

c) by adding the following two additional new paragraphs to the end 
thereof: 

"The storage of compressed gases in a pressure vessel of one 
thousand (1000) gallons or less shall be permitted (subject to 
the provisions of SECTION IX. C), provided the pressure vessel 
is located within a containment system designed to prevent any of 
the stored material from being released into the ground water. 

Compressed gas is defined as any material kept in a container 
with a pressure exceeding forty (40) pounds per square inch at 
seventy (70) degrees Fahrenheit or one hundred four (104) 
pounds per square inch at one hundred thirty (13 0) degrees 
Fahrenheit." ; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Member Pat Hagadorn moved that the Town amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as presented in 
Article 10 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town 
meeting, with the following change: 

by deleting the second paragraph in c) , which defines the term 
"compressed gas", and by substituting in lieu thereof the following 
definition: 

" 'Compressed gas' is defined as any material or mixture which, 
when enclosed in a container, has an absolute pressure exceeding 40 
psi at 21.1°C or, regardless of the pressure at 21.1°C has an 
absolute pressure exceeding 140 psi at 54.4°C; or any flammable 
material having a vapor pressure exceeding 40 psi absolute pressure 
at 37.7°C (Vapor pressure is determined by the Reid method - ASTM) . 
Compressed gases shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, 
liquified petroleum gases (q.v.), as well as oxygen, nitrogen, 
anhydrous ammonia, acetylene, nitrous oxide, and fluorocarbon 
gases . " Seconded . 

Ms. Hagadorn gave a brief explanation of the article. Board of 
Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried on a unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the 
Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER XVI - NON-CRIMINAL DISPOSITION OF 
CERTAIN VIOLATIONS," by adding to Section 4 thereof the following 
new subsections: 

Subsection B. General By-Laws : Notwithstanding the enforcement 
and penalties prescribed elsewhere in the General By-Laws of the 
Town of Ipswich and the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 

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Chapter 40, Section 21, the provisions of the following General 
By-Laws may be enforced by the designated official (s) and/or 
Board(s) /Commission(s) by noncriminal complaint. Except as 
specified hereinbelow, each day of violation shall constitute a 
separate offense. No enforcement under this subsection shall be 
authorized until the enforcing official and/or Board/Commission has 
mailed by certified mail or delivered in hand to the offender a 
written notice of violation and thirty (30) days have expired from 
the date of mailing or delivery and no appeal to a court of 
competent jurisdiction has been timely filed, and/or final 
determination has been made favorable to the Town. The penalty for 
violations shall be as follows: 

Article XII. Use of Streets, Sidewalks, and Public Places 

(Police) $ 50.00 

Article XIII. Use of Town Property. (Police) 50.00 

Article XIV. Occupational Licenses (Police) 50.00 

Article XV. Miscellaneous Provisions for Public 

Safety and Order 

1. Disorderly Behavior (Police) 50.00 

2. Discharge of Firearms (Police) 50.00 

3. Peeping Tom (Police) 50.00 

4. Advertising on Property of Others 
(Building Inspector) 50.00 

5. Disposal of Rubbish (Health Agent) 

a. first offense 50.00 

b. second and subsequent offense 2 00.00 

6. Taking of Seaweed (Shellfish 
Constable, Harbormaster) 50.00 

7. Sewer Tie-ins (Health Agent) 50.00 

8. Subsurface Storage of Materials 
(Fire Chief, Director of Utilities) 

a. first offense 50.00 

b. second and subsequent offense 200.00 

9 . Mandatory Metering of Non-Seasonal 
Water Services (Director of Util- 
ities) 50.00 

10. Public Water Use Restriction and 
Restraint (Director of Utilities) 50.00 

11. Street Numbering (Fire Chief) 

a. first offense Warning 

b. second and subsequent offense 50.00 
(Each thirty-day period shall 
constitute a separate offense) 

Article XVI. Demolition Delay 

(Historical Commission) 50.00 

Subsection C. Rule and Regulations . Notwithstanding the enforcement 
and penalties prescribed elsewhere in the General By-Laws of the 
Town of Ipswich and the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 40, Section 21, the provisions of the following Rules and 
Regulations of the Town of Ipswich may be enforced by the 

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designated official (s) and/or Board (s) /Commission (s) by noncriminal 
complaint. Except as specified hereinbelow, each day of violation 
shall constitute a separate offense. No enforcement under this 
subsection shall be authorized until the enforcing official and/or 
Board/Commission has mailed by certified mail or delivered in hand 
to the offender a written notice of violation and thirty (30) days 
have expired from the date of mailing or delivery and no appeal to 
a court of competent jurisdiction has been timely filed, and/or 
final determination has been made favorable to the Town. The 
penalty for violations shall be as follows: 

Shellfish Rules and Regulations 

(Shellfish Constable, Police) 50.00." 
; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Police Chief Charles Surpitski moved that the Town amend the 
General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 11 
of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town meeting. 
Seconded. 

Chief Surpitski urged support for this article. Board of Selectmen 
and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried by 
unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to change the following names 
of accepted streets: 

* Brown Square Extension to be renamed as "Soffron Lane" 

* Broadway Avenue Extension to be renamed as part of Broadway 

Avenue (and numbered sequentially) 

* Burleigh Place to be renamed "Burley Place" 

* Cedarview Terrace to be eliminated as street does not exist 

* Peabody Street Extension to be eliminated as street does not 

exist 

* Arrowhead Trail Extension to be renamed as part of Arrowhead 

Trail (and numbered sequentially) 

* Arrowhead Circle to be renamed as "Shagbark Woods"; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Police Chief Charles Surpitski moved that pursuant to the 
provisions of General By-Laws Chapter XI, " Section 6. Names of 
Streets " . the Town vote to change the names of certain accepted 
streets as presented in Article 12 of the warrant for the October 
17, 1992, special town meeting, 

with the exception that the words "Burleigh Place to be renamed 
Burley Place" be deleted, and the words "Burley Avenue to be 
renamed Burleigh Avenue" be inserted in lieu thereof. Seconded. 

Chief Surpitski spoke in favor of the changes which will be 

59 



necessary to implement the Enhanced-911 emergency system. Board of 
Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town of Ipswich will vote to amend the General Bylaws 
of the Town of Ipswich CHAPTER XV MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR 
PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY, "Section 5 Dog Control" as follows: 

1) by amending subsection (f) thereof by adding 
the following after the last sentence: "Owners 
or keepers of dogs shall license said animals 



between January 1 and March 31 each year or shall be 
subjected to a late fee of ($10) ten dollars for each 
month or part thereof said license is issued after March 
31." 

2) by adding a new subsection (g) thereto, to 
read as follows: "Any person owning, keeping 
or responsible for a dog shall not allow or 
permit said dog to annoy another person's or 
persons' reasonable rights to peace or privacy 
by making loud or continuous noise." 

3) by adding a new subsection (h) thereto, to 
read as follows: "Whoever violates Chapter XV 
Section 5 (g) of these By-Laws shall be 
punished by a fine of twenty-five ($25) 
dollars for each offense."; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Chief of Police Charles Surpitski moved that the Town amend the 
General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 13 
of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town meeting. 
Seconded. 

Chief Surpitski spoke in favor of this article. Board of Selectmen 
and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried by 
unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 148, Section "26H. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems; Lodging or Boarding Houses; 
Exceptions; Definitions"; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Fire Chief Willard Maker moved that the Town accept the provisions 

-60- 






of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 148, Section "26H. Automatic 
Sprinkler Systems; Lodging or Boarding Houses; Exceptions; 
Definitions." Seconded. 

Chief Maker spoke in favor of the sprinkler systems. Board of 
Selectmen voted four (4) in favor with one abstention. Finance 
Committee voted five (5) in favor and three (3) opposed. Finance 
Committee member Ray Morley spoke in favor. Costas Tsoutsouras 
asked what effect it had on existing buildings and the answer was 
none at the present time. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



Article 15 

To see if the Town of Ipswich will vote to amend the General Bylaws 
of the Town of Ipswich CHAPTER XIV OCCUPATIONAL LICENSES by adding 
a new " Section 3. Solicitors and Canvassers " as follows: 

" Section 3. Solicitors and Canvassers . 

A. License Required. It shall be unlawful for any 
solicitor or canvasser as defined in this by-law to 
engage in such business within the Town of Ipswich 
without first obtaining a license therefor in compliance 
with the provisions of this by-law. The provisions of 
this By-law shall not apply to any person exempted under 
Chapter 101 of the General Laws or to any person exempted 
by any other General Law, nor shall this by-law be 
construed to prevent route salesmen or other persons 
having established customers to whom they make periodic 
deliveries from calling upon such customers or from 
making calls upon prospective customers to solicit an 
order for future periodic route deliveries. Persons 
engaged in the pursuit of soliciting for charitable, 
benevolent, fraternal, religious or political activities 
shall be exempt from licensing after notification to the 
Chief of Police or his designee. 

B. Definition. A solicitor or canvasser is defined as 
any person who, for himself, or for any other person, 
firm or corporation travels by foot, automobile or any 
other type of conveyance from place to place, from house 
to house, or from street to street, taking or attempting 
to lease or take orders for retail sale of goods, ware 
merchandise, or services, including without limitation 
the selling, distributing, exposing for sale, or 
soliciting of orders for magazines, books, periodicals or 
other articles of a commercial nature, the contracting of 
all household improvements, and/or for services to be 
performed in the future, regardless whether or not such 
individual possesses, carries or exposes for retail sale 
a sample of the subject of such sale or whether he is 

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collecting advance payment on such retail sale. 

C. Application. Applicants for a license shall file 
with the Chief of Police, on a form issued by the Police 
Department, a written application signed under the 
penalties of perjury, containing the following 
information: 

(a) Name of applicant. 

(b) Address of applicant (local and 
permanent home address) . 

(c) Applicant's height, weight, eye and 
hair color. 

(d) Applicant's social security number. 

(e) The duration for which the license 
is desired. 

(f) A brief description of the nature of 
the business and the goods to be 
sold and/or services to be perform- 
ed. 

(g) The name and home office address of 
the applicant's employer. If self- 
employed, it shall so state. 

(h) A photograph of the applicant, 
submitted by the applicant, 2" x 2" 
in size and showing the head and 
shoulders of the applicant in a 
clear and distinguishing manner. 

(i) If operating a motor vehicle: the 
year, make, model, motor number, 
registration number, state of 
registration, vehicle's owner and 
address. 

At the time of the filing of the application, 
each applicant shall pay a fee accordance with 
a schedule of fees to be established from time 
to time by order of the Board of Selectmen, 
after a hearing held in accordance with 
Chapter IV, Section 6, of the General By-Laws. 

D. Investigation and Issuance. 

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1. Upon receipt of the application, the Chief of 
Police shall investigate the applicant's 
reputation as to morals and integrity. 

2. After an investigation of the applicant's 
morals and integrity, but within seven (7) 
business days of the filing of the 
application, the Chief of Police shall endorse 
on such application his approval or 
disapproval. Failure of the Police Chief to 
act on said permit within seven (7) business 
days of the applicant's filing shall 
constitute approval. If disapproved, the 
applicant shall have the right of appeal to 
the Board of Selectmen in writing within seven 
(7) days of the denial by the Chief of Police. 
The Board of Selectmen must act upon the 
appeal at one of their next two (2) regularly 
scheduled meetings. Failure to so act shall 
be deemed approval. 

3. Such license when issued shall contain the 
signature of the Chief of Police or of the 
Board of Selectmen and shall show the name, 
address, and photograph of said licensee, the 
date of issuance and the length of time the 
same shall be operative, as well as the 
license number. The Police Department shall 
keep a record of all licenses issued for a 
period of six (6) years. Solicitors and 
canvassers when engaged in the business of 
soliciting or canvassing shall be required to 
display an identifying badge issued by the 
Police Department, by wearing said badge on an 
outer garment. Each licensee is required to 
possess an individual license. 

E. Duty of Police to Enforce/Transfer. The police officers of the 
Town of Ipswich shall enforce this By-Law. No license shall be 
transferred. f 

F. Revocation of License. The Chief of Police is vested with 
authority to revoke licenses issued under this By-Law. Any person 
aggrieved by such revocation may appeal to the Board of Selectmen 
within seven (7) business days, and a hearing will be scheduled for 
one of the next two (2) regularly scheduled meetings of the Board 
of Selectmen. 

G. Expiration of License. Each license issued under the 
provisions of this By-Law shall continue in force from the date of 
its issue until the thirty-first day of December next following, 
unless sooner revoked. 

H. Renewal of License. A license issued under the provisions of 






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this By-Law may be renewed by the Chief of Police. An applicant 
requesting a renewal of a license must apply in person for such 
license renewal, and provide such information as is required to 
obtain an initial license. 

I. Misrepresentation. 

1. No solicitor or canvasser, licensed or exempted 
from license, may misrepresent, in any manner, the 
buyer's right to cancel as stipulated by Chapters 
93, 93A and 255D of the General Laws. 

2. No solicitor or canvasser, licensed or 
exempted from license, may use any plan, 
scheme or ruse which misrepresents the true 
status or mission of the person making the 
call in order to gain admission to a 
prospective buyer's home, office, or other 
establishment with the purpose of making a 
sale of consumer goods or services. 

J. Trespassing. It shall be unlawful for any canvasser or 
solicitor to enter the premises of a resident or business who has 
displayed a 'no trespassing' or 'no soliciting' sign or poster. 
Further, it shall be unlawful for canvassers or solicitors to 
ignore a resident's or business person's 'no solicitation' 
directive or to remain on private property after its owner has 
indicated that the canvasser or solicitor is not welcome. 

K. Penalty. Any person violating any provision of this By-Law 
shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not to exceed 
Fifty ($50.00) dollars for each offense."; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Chief of Police Charles Surpitski moved that the Town amend the 
General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 15 
of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town meeting. 
Seconded. 

Chief Surpitski urged support for this article. Board of Selectmen 
and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried by 
unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law 
of the Town of Ipswich: 

(1) by amending SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS. JL. 
Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations by deleting "RRB" from 
the DISTRICT Heading "Rural Residence (RRA & RRB, and RRC) ; and 

(2) by amending SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS. 

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B. Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations by adding a 
new DISTRICT heading as follows: 



DISTRICT 



USE 



MINIMUM 
LOT AREA 
(Sq.Ft) 



MINIMUM 
LOT WIDTH 
(ft.) 



MINIMUM 
LOT 

FRONTAGE 
(ft.) 



Rural Single-family 43,560 
Residence detached 
(RRB) (18) Single-family 
attached 



190 



50 



MAXIMUM MAXIMUM MINIMUM 
MINIMUM SETBACKS BUILDING FLOOR OPEN 

FRONT (1) (7) SIDE (2) (7) REAR (2) (7) AREA AREA SPACE 

(ft.) (ft.) (ft.) go m LU 



20 



and 



20' (19) 20' (19) 20% of 30% of 50% of 

lot area lot area lot area 
(20) (21) " 



(3) by amending SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS B. 
Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations by adding the follow- 
footnotes: 

"18. In the RRB district no single or two family dwelling need 
have the lot area, lot width, lot frontage, front setback, 
side setback, rear setback or open space greater than those 
lawfully in existence on the subject property at the time of 
enactment of this amendment. No single-family or two-family 
dwelling need have a maximum building area or floor area less 
than that lawfully in existence on the subject property at 
the time of enactment of this amendment. Accessory buildings 
and accessory structures lawfully in existence at the time of 
enactment of this amendment shall be considered as conforming 
to the requirements of this by-law. 

19. Temporary accessory buildings, such as temporary tents and 
screenhouses, are permitted in the rear and side setbacks, 
not less than ten (10) feet from any lot line, from May 15 to 
September 3 of each year; except that the provisions of 
Footnote #2 of this Table may not be used further to reduce 
a setback to a distance less than that otherwise permitted 
under the provisions of this Footnote #19. 

20. In the Rural Residence B (RRB) district the maximum 
building area shall include the maximum building area for 
both the principal building and any accessory buildings on 
the site. This calculation shall not include the maximum 
building area of temporary structures or buildings, such as 
temporary tents and screen houses. 



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21. In the case of rooms with high ceilings where the height is 
sufficient to construct two (2) habitable floors under the 
current standards of the Massachusetts Building Code, the 
floor area shall be calculated as that which could be 
allowable under the current Building Code standards." ; and 

(4) by amending SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS B. 
Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations . Footnote #2, by 
adding the following words at the beginning of said Footnote: 

"Except with respect to principal buildings in the Rural Residence 
B District," so that Footnote #2 shall read as follows: 

"2. Except with respect to principal structures in the Rural 
Residence B District, in the specific case of an irregular, narrow, 
or shallow lot or a lot unusual either in shape or topography, or 
a lot on which an existing building became non-conforming by the 
adoption of this By-Law, the Zoning Board of Appeals may reduce by 
special permit the side and rear yard requirements up to a maximum 
of fifty (50%) percent."; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Planning Board Member John Beagan moved that the Town amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as presented in 
Article 16 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, special town 
meeting, with the following change: 

in the (3) third amendment presented in this article, by deleting 
the text of the proposed Footnote #18 and by substituting in lieu 
thereof the following text: 

"18. The provisions of this Subsection shall not apply to the 

alteration, reconstruction, extension, or structural change 
to a single or two-family residential structure lawfully in 
existence at the time of enactment of this amendment under 
the following circumstances: 

a) the proposed changes comply with the height restric- 
tion; and 

b) the proposed changes comply with the requirement for 
maximum building area, or, if they do not comply, the 
proposed changes do not result in an increase in build- 
ing area on the lot; and 

c) the proposed changes comply with the requirements for 
maximum floor area, or, if they do not comply, the pro- 
posed changes do not result in an increase in floor area 
on the lot; and 

d) the proposed changes comply with the requirements for 
minimum open space, or, if they do not comply, the pro- 
posed changes do not result in a decrease in the open 
space on the lot; and 

e) the proposed changes comply with the setback require- 
ments, or, if they do not comply, the proposed changes do 
not result in a decrease in the distance between any lot 



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line and the nearest point of the structure; and 
f ) proposed changes to enlarge the structure do not prevent 
compliance with regulations governing the repair, 
expansion or replacement of septic systems, or with any 
other applicable laws or regulations. 

For the purposes of this By-Law, an alteration, reconstruc- 
tion, extension or structural change meeting the criteria 
set forth in this footnote is not deemed to increase 
the non-conforming nature of the structure, and is allowable 
as a matter of right." 
Seconded. 

Planning Board Member John Beagan briefly explained the article and 
then introduced Kerry Mackin, Chairman of the Great Neck Zoning 
Committee. Ms. Mackin thoroughly outlined all the issues involved 
in this article and cleared up the language in the proposed 
Footnote #18. She said the article addresses most of the issues at 
the Neck which would establish clear, fair rules that apply to 
everyone and should reduce the amount of litigation. 
Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. 
Finance Committee Chairman Jamie Fay praised Kerry Mackin and her 
committee for all their hard work on this article. He recommended 
full support on this article. Bob Ryan, President of the Great 
Neck Association said the article was well written by the people 
who have to live with it. Recreation Director Betty Dorman 
questioned temporary buildings, such as screen houses and was told 
there were no complaints from the residents of the Neck. ZBA 
Member Arthur Sotis thanked Ms. Mackin for her hard work preparing 
this article for town meeting. Motion carried by a unanimous voice 
vote. 



ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to approve the Open Space- 
Recreation Plan published by the Conservation Commission in 
October, 1992; and (2) to establish an Open Space Committee 
as a Standing Committee of the Town, consisting of seven (7) 
members to be appointed by the Moderator with the advice of the 
Conservation Commission. The responsibilities of this Committee 
shall be: 

* to prepare and submit, with public input, the Town's Open 
Space and Recreation Plan every five (5) years in accordance with 
then current state guidelines; 

* to perform an advocacy role for open space and recreation, 
actively encouraging and working with other town entities to 
fulfill plan objectives; 

* to work closely with the Conservation Commission in that 
Board's historic role as the agency responsible for submitting 
the five-year plan; 



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* and to report to the Town annually on its accomplishments 
via the town meeting and the annual town report."; or 

to take any other action relative thereto. 

Conservation Committee Member Jim Berry moved that Town vote (1) 
to approve the Open Space-Recreation Plan published by the 
Conservation Commission in October, 1992; and (2) to establish an 
Open Space Committee as a Standing Committee of the Town, 
consisting of seven (7) members to be appointed by the Moderator 
with the advice of the Conservation Commission. The 
responsibilities of this Committee shall be: 

* to prepare and submit, with public input, the Town's Open 
Space and Recreation Plan every five (5) years in accordance with 
then current state guidelines; 

* to work closely with the Conservation Commission in that 
Board's historic role as the agency responsible for submitting 
the five-year plan; 

* and to report to the Town annually on its accomplishments 
via the town meeting and the annual town report." Seconded. 

Mr. Berry, who is chairman of the Ad Hoc Open Space Committee (a 
sub-committee of the Conservation Commission) , outlined the two 
reasons for the update and the six goals for the revised five (5) 
year open space plan and new map. He recommended appointing a new 
standing committee to report its accomplishments to the town 
meeting annually. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and 
Conservation Commission unanimously recommended this article. 
Conservation Commission Chairman Lillian North urged support for 
this article to get some help for the commission. Planning Board 
unanimously recommended this article and commended Mr. Berry and 
his committee on a very fine job. Mr. Berry, in response to a 
question, said the plan was not binding but a recommendation to the 
Town. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote: 

(1) to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER II 
ORGANIZATION AND POWERS OF TOWN MEETINGS, Section 6. Bond 
Appropriations , by deleting the same in its entirety; or 

(2) to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER II 
ORGANIZATION AND POWERS OF TOWN MEETINGS, Section 6. Bond 
Appropriations . by deleting subparagraph (b) in its entirety and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following subparagraph: 

"b) an appropriation of an amount less than three million five 
hundred thousand ($3,500,000) dollars for a school or schools, 
sewers, or sewer installations, or"; and 

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by deleting the first sentence fragment of subparagraph (c) 
and by substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"(c) an appropriation of an amount less than one million two 
hundred thousand ($1,200,000) dollars for any other purpose, shall 
be valid unless the article and the motion calling for such 
appropriation shall be adopted by a vote on a printed ballot after 
there has been full opportunity for debate on the merits of the 
said article or motion."; or 

(3) to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER II 
ORGANIZATION AND POWERS OF TOWN MEETINGS, Section 6. Bond 
Appropriations , by deleting subparagraph (b) in its entirety and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following subparagraph: 

"b) an appropriation of an amount less than one percent (1%) of the 
equalized valuation of real and personal property within the town, 
for a school or schools, sewers, or sewer installations, or"; and 

by deleting the first sentence fragment of subparagraph (c) 
and by substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"(c) an appropriation of an amount less than one tenth of one 
percent (0.1%) of the equalized valuation of real and personal 
property within the town, for any other purpose, shall be valid 
unless the article and the motion calling for such appropriation 
shall be adopted by a vote on a printed ballot after there has been 
full opportunity for debate on the merits of the said article or 
motion."; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town amend the General By-Laws 
of the Town of Ipswich, CHAPTER II ORGANIZATION AND POWERS OF TOWN 
MEETINGS, Section 6. Bond Appropriations , by deleting subparagraph 
(b) in its entirety and by substituting in lieu thereof the 
following subparagraph: 

"b) an appropriation of an amount less than two million five 
hundred thousand ($2,500,000) dollars for a school or schools, 
sewers, or sewer installations, or"; and 

by deleting the first sentence fragment of subparagraph (c) 
and by substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"(c) an appropriation of an amount less than three hundred fifty 
thousand ($350,000) dollars for any other purpose, shall be valid 
unless the article and the motion calling for such appropriation 
shall be adopted by a vote on a printed ballot after there has been 
full opportunity for debate on the merits of the said article or 
motion." Seconded. 

Mr. Engel commented on the article and said the Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended. Finance Committee voted 7-2 in favor and 
urged support for the article. Finance Committee Member Geoffrey 
Hunt, speaking for the majority on the committee, said this article 

-69- 



re-instates dollar limits to '92-'93 dollars. Finance Committee 
Member Bill Craft, speaking for the minority on the committee, said 
this was a money issue which should not have been presented at a 
special town meeting and he felt this article should have been 
reviewed by bond counsel. Mr. Craft suggested amending the motion 
by striking the school section and changing the dollar amount in 
subparagraph (c) to two hundred fifty thousand ($250,000) dollars. 

Mr. Craft moved that the Town amend the General By-Laws of the Town 
Of Ipswich, CHAPTER II ORGANIZATION AND POWERS OF TOWN MEETINGS, 
Section 6. Bond Appropriations , by deleting the first sentence 
fragment of subparagraph (c) and by substituting in lieu thereof 
the following: 

"(c) an appropriation of an amount less than two hundred fifty 
thousand ($250,000) dollars for any other purpose, shall be valid 
unless the article and the motion calling for such appropriation 
shall be adopted by a vote on a printed ballot after there has been 
full opportunity for debate on the merits of the said article or 
motion . " Seconded . 

Former Finance Committee Members Bill Markos and David Scudder 
supported the minority vote of the Finance Committee and urged 
support in favor of Mr. Craft's amendment. School Committee 
members Cynthia Quinn and Larry Seidler spoke against the 
amendment. Following further discussion, the question was moved, 
seconded and carried by a two-thirds voice vote. The vote on the | 
amendment failed to pass by majority voice vote. John Beagan moved 
and it was seconded to indefinitely postpone the main motion. The 
voice vote was inconclusive. On a handcount with 87 in favor and 
65 against, the motion carried for indefinite postponement. 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town, pursuant 
to the provisions of General Laws Chapter 40, Section 4A, to enter 
into an agreement up to five (5) years in duration with one or 
more other governmental units to perform jointly with or for such 
other governmental unit(s) the sharing of equipment and 
associated personnel for public activities and services; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Weymouth Atkinson moved that the Town vote to authorize 
the Town, pursuant to the provisions of General Laws Chapter 40, 
Section 4A, to enter into an agreement up to five (5) years in 
duration with one or more other governmental units to perform 
jointly with or for such other governmental unit(s) the sharing of 
equipment and associated personnel for public activities and 
services. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. 
Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



-70- 



\RTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under 
\rticle 5 of the April 6, 1992, Annual Town Meeting (the FY93 
school department operating budget) ; and/or to amend its action 
taken under Article 4 of the April 6, 1992, Annual Town Meeting 
(the FY93 municipal operating budget) ; by raising and appropriat- 
ing and/or transferring from available funds a sum or sums of 
additional money, and/or by reducing the amount (s) appropriated 
thereunder; for the purpose of assuring the Town's eligibility for 
disbursement of "educational offset: per pupil aid" for Fiscal Year 
1993; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee Member Lawrence Seidler moved that action on this 
article be postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 

Mr. Seidler expressed his appreciation to Finance Director Donna 
Walsh for her help in putting together the school grant 
applications. 

Motion to indefinitely postpone carried by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote: 

A) to accept the street known as "Pond Edge Lane" in accordance 
with the plans entitled: 

"Definitive Subdivision of Pond Edge Lane 

in Ipswich, Ma. Lotting Plan 
Owner and Applicant: Pond Edge Realty Trust 

Carl E. Gardner, Jr., Trustee 

11 Turkey Shore Road, Ipswich, Ma. 
Scale: 1"= 40' ; 

Date: July 14, 1989, and revised to November 9, 1989; 
Prepared by: Hancock Survey Associates, Inc. 

2 Electronics Ave., Danvers, Ma. 01923 
Sheet 1 of 4; 
Project No. 3796 
Stamped by: Vaclav V. Talacko, Registered Professional 

Engineer (Mass. #34026) and Frederick M. Forbes, 

Professional Land Surveyor (Mass. # 27878)" 

and. recorded at the Essex South District Registry of Deeds, 
Plan Book 260, Plan 69 and subject to a Certificate of Vote, 
recorded in Book 10370, page 361; and 

B) to accept the street known as "Farley Avenue Extension", and 
name it as part of "Farley Avenue", in accordance with the plans 
entitled: 

"Subdivision Plan of Land- Ipswich, Mass. 

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Owner: Steve Turner et al.; 

Engineer: Leon B. Turner Jr. et.al.; 

Scale: 1"=40'; 

Dated: April 14, 1987, and revised to February 22, 1988; 

Stamped by: Leon B. Turner, Registered Professional Land 

Surveyor, and Paul S. Casey, Registered Professional 

Engineer" 
and 

"As-built Plan 
Farley Avenue (Extension) Ipswich, Mass 
Surveyor: Leon B. Turner 
Stamped by: Leon B. Turner, Registered Professional Land 

Surveyor, and Paul S. Casey, Registered Professional 

Engineer 
Scale: 1"=40'; 
Dated: December 7, 1991"; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Member John Beagan moved that the Town vote: 

A) to accept the street known as "Pond Edge Lane" in accordance 
with the plans presented in Article 21 of the warrant for the 
October 17, 1992, special town meeting; and 

B) to accept the street known as "Farley Avenue Extension", and 
name it as part of "Farley Avenue", in accordance with the plans 
presented in Article 21 of the warrant for the October 17, 1992, 
special town meeting. Seconded. 

Mr. Beagan said the streets had been completed, inspected and 
accepted by the Town Boards. Board of Selectmen and Finance 
Committee unanimously in favor. Motion carried by unanimous voice 
vote. 

A voice vote taken by the Moderator on whether the town meeting 
members liked or disliked the Saturday morning meeting was 
inconclusive. The meeting was adjourned at 12:42 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up 
attested copies thereof at the Post Office and at each of the 
meeting houses in the Town, by publication at least seven (7) 
days prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper 
published in, or having a general circulation in, the Town of 
Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this 21st day of September in the year of 
our Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-Two. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Charles J. Wayne James R. Engel 

Patrick J. McNally Weymouth M. Atkinson, Jr. 

William E. George 

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******** 

30ARD OF SELECTMEN 
Charles J. Wayne, Chairman 

The makeup of the Board of Selectmen changed in Calendar Year 1992. 
In the annual election in April, William I. Walton lost his seat to 
newcomer Weymouth M. Atkinson, Jr. Weymouth's experience as a call 
firefighter and familiarity with a public service and union 
background will be an added dimension to the Board. This Board is 
now more involved in the operation of the Town and overseeing the 
Town Manager. 

With our priority relating to financial affairs, the goal of 
getting the audits up-to-date has been achieved. There has been a 
reversal in the amount of free cash - a debit has been erased. The 
Trust Funds are being monitored in accordance with the original 
directives; and the Trust Fund Commission was fully complemented 
for the first time in several years with the appointment of three 
new Commissioners. 

The Trash Contract was successfully rebid at a considerable savings 
to the Town. Curbside recycling of newspapers, glass and some 
metals was instituted July 1st. The expense stayed within the 
confines of the budget. 

The Board of Selectmen encouraged a replacement for Town Counsel 
with a Boston law firm specializing in municipal law. 

Continued support and dialogue with the Coastal Pollution Control 
Committee in tandem with the Massachusetts Audubon Society - Mass 
Bays Grant Program shows the Town of Ipswich as a leader in the 
area working for clean coastal zones. 

In March the Essex County HOME Consortium Contract was completed, 
and the Ipswich Housing Partnership Committee was reactivated. 

The Annual Town Meeting on 6 April 92 approved the override for a 
fire pumper and an addition to Doyon School, which was supported by 
the Board of Selectmen, but it failed at the ballot. 

Following Town election, the leadership of the Board changed when 
Charles J. Wayne and Patrick J. McNally were voted Chairman and 
Vice-chairman respectively. 

The Special Town Meeting on 27 July 92 amended the Zoning By-Law on 
The Neck to assure equitable treatment to homeowners and assurance 
their homes could be rebuilt in the event of a catastrophe. 

By a three to two vote on 28 July 92, the Town Manager was 
reappointed with the execution of a three-year contract. 

A Saturday was tested for the first time with success on 17 October 
92 when the Fall Town Meeting was held. Open Space Preservation 



-73- 



Zoning was adopted, as well as the Non-Criminal Disposition of 
Certain Violations. 

Dedicated volunteers continue to work towards the installation of 
the E- 911 system. An Ambulance Service Study Committee was formed 
to determine the feasibility of a Town operated ambulance service. 
An Open Space and Recreation Committee, which had previously 
functioned as a subcommittee of the Conservation Commission, was 
established. A Drug-Free Workplace Policy was approved, and a 
Sexual Harassment Policy was adopted. A Joint Equipment Sharing 
Contract with other towns was executed. 

This Board of Selectmen is more sensitive to the needs of the 
public. It understands the concerns of the taxpayer and its 
responsibility as the people's representative. 

******** 

TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

Our local government's experience in 1992 was one of fine- 
tuning reorganization efforts begun in the prior year, and 
of slowly recovering from the adverse fiscal effects of 
delayed audits and the downturn in the economy. 

Among the additional changes in our organizational structure 
were the engagement of a law firm, on a contractual basis, 
rather than an individual attorney on an employer-employee 
basis. With encouragement from members of the Board of Select- 
men, the town manager appointed the firm of Kopelman and Paige 
as counsel effective July 1st. A deputy chief was appointed 
within the Police Division, Department of Public Safety. 

Other personnel changes which occurred during the year include 
the appointment of Richard Sullivan as Deputy Collector; Willard 
Maker as Chief of the Fire Division; and Edward Poskus as Director 
of Code Enforcement. 

Considerable time and effort was spent in reviewing the draft 
audits for FY91 and FY92. Thankfully, we are now caught up in our 
financial reporting. Deficits in several fund balances were covered 
by the close of the year; and free cash was certified at a positive 
number for the first time in three fiscal years. 

Several weeks were spent reviewing our insurance coverages, 
including engaging the services of a risk management consultant. 
Some adjustments and improvements in coverages were implemented; 
others will follow. 

Pursuant to a by-law change adopted in April, a comprehensive 
update of fees was presented to the Board of Selectmen for adoption 
in August. 

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3 ersonnel and training activities, in addition to staff changes, 
Included annual performance evaluations; review and updating of 
ill personnel rules and regulations and personnel policies; 
irafting for adoption policies on the drug free workplace and on 
sexual harassment; and continued review of the town's job descrip- 
:ions, practices and procedures for compliance with the provisions 
}f the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) . Several employees 
/ere trained in customer relations; others received in-house 
:raining in Lotus 1-2-3 and have used it in budget preparations 
:his fall. 

Purchasing activities included significant chunks of time drafting 
specifications for bid for curbside refuse collection, curbside 
recycling, refuse incineration (tipping) services, and transfer 
station service; for the replacement of the town's aging mini- 
computer; and in review of the reed technology specifications. 

Three town meetings were coordinated. Easements were pursued for 
the Labor-In-Vain bridge repairs; and designs were commenced for 
repairs to the Green Street bridge. 

\s usual, thanks is extended to town staff for their devotion and 
extra effort during this fiscally difficult period of no raises 
and expired contracts. 

******** 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - Charles D. Surpitski, Director 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Chief 

The mission of the Police Department to protect the property, 
personal, constitutional and statutory rights of all citizens 
remained. Unfortunately, many of the crime trends of society as a 
whole have affected what happens in our Town. Drug use, violence 
and a disrespect for the property and rights of others happen all 
too frequently here as in our neighboring urban areas. To combat 
such incidents, we have used traditional and innovative strategies 
to prevent and investigate each occurrence. Our involvement in the 
cooperative eight community Cape Ann Regional Drug Strike Force has 
had a positive deterrent effect on the sale of drugs. Our 
involvement in the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program is 
having a positive effect on drug use prevention. Our ability to 
field sufficient police officers to respond to personal calls for 
service, incidents of crimes against property or persons or medical 
or emotional needs remained constant. Those that violated our laws 
were certain of active investigation and appropriate prosecution. 

To accomplish this mission and meet the expectations of our 
citizens, training of police officers was undertaken. Police 
officers benefit from in-service training, the Law Enforcement 
Television Network, firearms, first aid, and specialized seminars 

-75- 



dealing with specific crimes, detection, and investigation as well 
as general trends upgrading the delivery of police services in a 
compassionate and professional manner. 

Finally, the Police Department would like to thank you for your 
commitment to effective law enforcement. Through citizen 
involvement and financial support, the community remains safe. 

1992 Statistics 

Rape 2 

Robbery 1 

Assaults 68 

Breaking & Entering 55 

Larceny 214 

Motor Vehicle Thefts & Recoveries 40 

Forgery & Counterfeiting 4 

Fraud 9 

Malicious Damage 267 

Weapons-Carrying, Possession 9 

Domestic Disputes 58 

Missing & Runaways 44 

Medical Aid 303 

Complaints Received 8014 

Accidents 336 

Accident Injuries 81 

Fatalities 

Warrants 159 

******** 

FIRE DIVISION 

Willard Maker, Jr., Fire Chief 

Incidents of fire decreased this year as compared to previous 
years. This indicates an increased awareness on the part of our 
citizens. As the result of an early detection system and an 
excellent firefighting force, we experienced no large loss fires. 

The Town Meeting adopted three important sprinkler statutes which 
are designed and implemented to save lives. The Division has also 
been working with the owners of 3 - 5 unit apartment buildings to 
improve their fire alarm systems and comply with state law. 

Along with other town, state and federal agencies, we have begun to 
develop plans for emergencies such as a release from the Seabrook 
Power Station or petroleum spills on the water. Fire Division 
personnel continue to provide increased service to the public by 
responding to medical emergencies, motor vehicle accidents, and 
other calls for assistance. 

We received as a gift from the Essex Fire Department a used 2,300 
gallon tank truck. Needed repairs to place it in service are 
ongoing. Our apparatus fleet is lacking one pumper. Efforts to 

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secure its purchase were begun. At times only two pumpers are in 
service. This leaves the Linebrook Station with no pumper. 

The following inspections were completed: 

Fire Alarm 280 

LP Gas 54 

Oil Burners 133 

Underground Storage Tanks 53 

Buildings 421 

The Division responded to the following incidents: 

Structure Fires 31 

Other Fires 71 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 104 

Hazardous Materials 43 

Medical Emergencies 232 

False Alarms 172 

Mutual Aid 8 

Other Service 320 

The Division raised $7,380 in revenue through permit and inspection 
fees. 

********* 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Harry W. Leno, Jr. , Animal Control Officer 

Once again the dedicated efforts of the Ipswich Humane Group have 
enhanced the quality of life for animals at the Dog Pound on 
Fowler's Lane. As always, conscientious and loving care has been 
provided on weekends and holidays and during emergencies. The 
Humane Group's outstanding improvement for 1992 was the gift of 
large new stainless steel cages to be used for the safe isolation 
of sick cats and of mother cats with their kittens. 

The Animal Control Officer continues to educate the public to the 
various issues of humane animal care and control through informal 
discussion with pet owners and outreach in the schools. The major 
steps that any owner can take in order to prevent problems are: 
(1) licensing of dogs and identification for all pets, (2) spaying 
and neutering animals so that only wanted litters are born, and (3) 
following recommended immunization procedures. It is of paramount 
importance this year that all animals receive the rabies 
inoculation. Cats must be immunized because they are one of the 
first barriers between the rabies virus and the human host to break 
down. 

I extend my heartfelt thanks to all the Ipswich people who have 
helped make my work more effective and compassionate. 






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STATISTICS FOR 1992 



Complaints received 3308 

Complaints investigated 3004 

Dog bites 11 

Animals killed by cars 329 

Animals killed by dogs 3 

Dogs picked up 150 

Kennel licenses 46 



Dogs & cats euthanized 6 

Dogs returned to owners 224 

Feline complaints 260 

Citations issued 162 

Licenses issued 1237 

Animals adopted 47 



******** 



HARBORS 

Charles D. Surpitski, Harbormaster 

Charles C. Schwartz, Assistant Harbormaster 

The Harbors Division of the Department of Public Safety continued 
to manage the use of our unique natural resource. Compliance with 
laws, rules and regulations formulated to insure safe operation of 
boats was stressed. The high visibility of Ptl. Charles Schwartz, 
the harbor patrol officer, reinforced this sense of duty to others. 
Thankfully, there were no major boating accidents. 

The Division's need for a more appropriate boat to deal with water 
emergencies was pointed out and efforts to secure such a craft were 
begun. Although the Town's tight financial condition prevented its 
purchase this year, we are hopeful that the need will be addressed 
next. This is essential to our ability to address emergencies on 
our waterways. 

The Division worked closely with other Town departments, federal, 
state and private organizations. The assistance and cooperative 
effort of these groups is appreciated and needed. 

The use of our waters remained heavy over the summer months by both 
residents and visitors. Regulatory markers, the wharf and docks 
were maintained. Improvements to the launching ramp were initiated 
and hopefully will be completed next year. 

Boating Permits 

Launching/In State Daily 350 

Launching/Out of State Daily 18 

Launching/In State Seasonal 105 

Launching/Out of State Seasonal 1 

Mooring 573 



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******** 

HELLFISH 

hilip A. Kent, Shellfish Constable 

lice H. Thanos, Chairman, Shellfish Advisory Board 

he Shellfish Constable with his two part time deputies continued 
o manage the resource both for the immediate and the future, 
ooperative efforts were conducted with the Commonwealth of 
assachusetts water quality agencies to monitor the ever increasing 
tress that pollution is placing on our clam flats. Long term 

; easures to control this threat must begin soon. With the 
ssistance of the Shellfish Advisory Board, deputies dealing with 
he Town rules and regulations governing the taking of shellfish 
nd especially licensing of clammers were undertaken and decisions 

! ade. The department sought and received approval from the Special 
own Meeting in October to decriminalize violations of these 
egulations. This will make for more compassionate enforcement. 

he resource was abundant over the past year and, as a result, many 
lammers were issued permits. There were: 

149 commercial licenses issued 

109 family licenses 

141 residential licenses 

45 non-resident daily permits 

26 non-resident yearly permits 

9 non-resident over age 65 

s in years past, assistance was rendered and received from the 
pswich Harbors Department, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
epartment of Environmental Protection, and the Environmental 
olice. 

V 

******* 

(EPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

(avid R. Clements, Director/John T. Clogston, Asst. Director 

'he year 1992 was an uneventful year for Emergency Management. The 
lighlight was the storm in December of 1992. The E-O-C was opened 
it 7 a.m. with the prediction of extremely heavy rain, extra high 
:ides along with a full moon. It was not necessary to evacuate 
inyone from their home. The storm was considered routine for 
[pswich, but a state-of -emergency was declared by Gov. Weld's 
office, and later by the Federal Government. The E-O-C closed at 
I p.m. that evening. 

Emergency Management continues to train its personnel for the 
state-of-emergency in times of natural and man-made disasters. 

Director Clements regularly attends monthly meetings for Area I in 
Tewksbury and also the North Shore Civil Defense Council which are 
hosted in different towns each month. The Ipswich Emergency 



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Operating Center is opened every Monday evening from 7 p.m. to 9 
p.m. at the Ipswich Middle School. 

The Aux. Police, under the direction of Capt. James Melnyk, 
continues to train and ride in the cruisers on weekends under the 
supervision of the regular Police Department. This is part of 
their continuing training program. 

******** 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS - Armand T. Michaud, Director 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of the 
following divisions: Public Works Administration, Highway, 
Cemetery/Parks Division, Equipment Maintenance, Building 
Maintenance Division, Transfer Station, Rubbish Disposal, 
Recycling, and Snow and Ice Control. Each division is charged with 
particular responsibilities relating to its duties. When 
additional manpower is required to perform specific tasks, 
personnel are interchanged within the divisions. 

Below is a summary of the work completed by each of the Public 
Works Divisions: 

Snow and Ice Control 

The Public Works Divisions combine their work forces during the 
winter months. The work consists of plowing roads, hauling snow, 
sanding, salting roadways, filling sand barrels, cleaning catch 
basins, clearing snow away from hydrants, and answering | 
miscellaneous complaints. Other personnel assisting the Public, 
Works crews during the height of the snow storms were from the 
Cemetery, Water, and Sewer Departments. This division responded to 
twenty-five different types of storms. 

Equipment Maintenance Division - Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 
All Public Works vehicles are serviced and repaired at the Town 
Garage. At present there are 54 pieces of motorized equipment that 
must be kept in good operating condition to insure its availability; 
when needed. Operation cost records showing maintenance and 
gas/oil expenses on each vehicle can be ascertained from the Public 
Works Administration Office in the Town Hall. Three new sanders 
were purchased this year. 

Building Maintenance Division 

Routine maintenance and minor repairs were performed at the Town 
Hall and Municipal Garage throughout the year. There was some 
repair work done on the roof of the Town Hall, and a new furnace 
was installed. 

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Highway Division - Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division which is the largest in the Public Works 
Department is charged with the maintenance and repairing of the 
Town's streets and drainage systems. The winter schedule consists 
mainly of Snow and Ice Control and routine maintenance which does 
not require excavations. During the other three seasons, the men 
are kept busy with projects varying from road construction to 
street sweeping. 

Normal maintenance consists of patching streets, repairing the 
Town's drains, repairing sidewalks, and maintenance on all signs. 

All catch basins in Town were cleaned. Several plugged drains were 
cleared. 

The following roads were hot topped: Boxford Road, Mile Lane, 
Little Neck Road, Heartbreak Road, Linebrook Road, and Northgate 
Road. 

Street sweeping was performed twice a week in the downtown area 
from April to December. All Town roads and sidewalks were swept in 
the spring to rid them of winter sand deposits. 

Crosswalks, parking spaces, and traffic lines were painted in the 
downtown areas. As in previous years, the crosswalks were painted 
green. Also 142,239 lineal feet of center lines and fog lines were 
painted. 

All gravel roads were graded twice in 1992 (April and November) . 

Other projects included setting up voting booths for the election 
and setting up for the April Annual Town Meeting and the October 
Special Town Meeting. 

Tree Warden - Armand Michaud 

The Town of Ipswich was awarded a $10,000 grant from MA RELEAF. An 
amount of $12,000 was the portion of the FEMA grant of $69,000 for 
tree replacement. 

Transfer Station 

The Transfer Station seems to be running very well. Recycling bins 
for cans, glass, and paper are on the site. Approximately 3 50 
people use this facility per week. There is an area for white 
goods and metals. Leaves and yard debris may be hauled there year 
around. • There is a Salvation Army bin for used clothing. 

Sanitation 

There is a new policy that one large item (except white goods or 
metals) may be left on the regular trash day. There will no longer 
be a Spring and Fall big rubbish day. Curbside recycling for 
newspaper, cans, and glass began in Ipswich on July 13, 1992. 



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******** 
CEMETERIES/PARKS - James E. Graff urn, Superintendent 

Routine grounds maintenance was performed in the Towns seven parks 
and playgrounds. Ball field maintenance was performed so that the 
fields were in a safe and playable condition. All fields were 
roto-tilled and graded. Additional infield material was added as 
needed. All grass sections were limed and fertilized. Brush was 
cut around the perimeter of Bialek Park. A new warning track was 
installed at the baseball diamond. 

All town commons and open spaces were maintained. 

Sally's and Bakers pond were kept clear of snow during the skating 
season. 

General grounds maintenance was performed in the towns nine 
cemeteries. Brush was removed from the New Highland Cemetery , South 
Cemetery and Linebrook Cemetery. Pruning and removal of damaged 
trees was performed. Monument foundations and setting of corner 
posts were also done. 

Thirty-two old monuments were re-set. 

There were ninety-nine funerals in 1992. 

REVENUE 

Perpetual Care $ 5,700.00 

Sale of Lots 7,125.00 

Foundations 4,805.50 

Tent Rental 1,400.00 

Openings 26,422 .98 

Total $ 45,453.48 



******** 

SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Cathy Col, Chairman 

In 1992, the Ipswich Solid Waste Advisory Committee continued its 
efforts to expand recycling options in Ipswich, comply with State 
environmental regulations, and educate the general public about the 
need for and benefits of recycling and waste reduction. 

In the past year we: 

• staffed a monthly drop-off site at the Town Hall from 
January to June 

• helped research and implement a Town-wide curbside recycling 
program that began in July 

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• compiled and published the Ipswich Green Pages, a resource of 
information about waste reduction, recycling, and 
environmentally friendly products 

• continued to monitor and expand recycling options at the 
Transfer Station 

• monitored levels of curbside recycling participation 

• continued to collect and compost leaves at the Transfer 
Station. The composted product is available at the DPW garage 
for use by Ipswich citizens. Bring your own container and 
wear boots! 

• continued the sale of composting bins at Corliss Brothers. 
The bins are made of recycled plastic and are available at 
reduced cost through a program sponsored by the Audubon 
Society 

• investigated alternatives for disposal of household hazardous 
waste, tires, and batteries 

• investigated the feasibility of offsetting disposal costs by 
charging nominal fees for disposal of white goods, tires and 
brush at the Transfer Station 

• supported and distributed information about the Massachusetts 
Recycling Initiative - Question 3 on the November ballot 

The following are members of the Solid Waste Advisory Committee: 
Cathy Col, Domenic Batalado, Carolyn Britt, Kris Glennon, Joyce 
Harrington, Kathleen Mersereau, Barbara Ostberg, Winthrop Snow, 
James Temple, Laurie Veit, and Armand Michaud. 



Ipswich Recycling - Monthly Tonnage of Newspaper, Glass, Tin & 

Plastic 




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******** 

DEPARTMENT OF CODE ENFORCEMENT - Edward A. J. Poskus , Director 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Edward A. J. Poskus, Building Inspector 

Category # Permits Fees 

New Residential 41 

New Commercial: 4 

Residential Add & Alt: 354 

Commercial Add & Alt: 12 

Public Assembly Insp: 59 

Demolition: 4 

TOTAL BUILDING: 474 $35,070.00 

TOTAL PLUMBING; 12 7,361.00 

TOTAL GAS: 124 2,695.00 

BUILDING DIVISION TOTAL $45,126.00 



******** 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Domenic A. Badolato, Jr. , Health Agent 

The following is the yearly report for the activities of the Health 
Department for the year 1992: 

Licenses & Permits: 



Food Service 70 

Retail Food 11 

Disposal Works Construction 73 

Septic Haulers 13 

Septic Installers 45 

Swimming Pools 2 

Recreational Camps 2 
Health Inspections and Investigations: 

Food Services Inspections 214 

Full Housing Inspections 86 

No Heat Complaints 4 

Trash and Debris Complaints 15 

Insect and Rodent Complaints 10 

Perc Tests 83 

Septic Plans Reviewed 115 

Septic System Inspections 206 

Referrals from Building Inspector 14 

Swimming Pool Inspections 4 

Water Testing 38 

Dye Testing 28 

Conferences Attended 16 
Health Complaints (Misc.) Investigated 79 



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Sealer of Weights and Measures Inspections: 
Gasoline Pumps 66 

Oil Trucks 7 

Apothecary 3 

Scales of Balances 38 

Readjustments 16 



******** 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1992, 81 petitions were presented to the Zoning Board of 
Appeals. There were 66 requests for Special Permits, all of which 
were granted. There were five requests for Variances; once was 
granted, four were denied. There were two appeals; one was 
affirmed, one was reversed. Six petitions were withdrawn or 
dismissed. Two requests for reconsideration were granted. 

During the year, Jim Theodosopoulos was reappointed as a regular 
member for a five-year term. John Verani and Joseph R. Petranek 
were reappointed as associate members for a one-year term. Jim 
Theodosopoulos was reelected as chairman and Dana Jordan was 
reelected vice-chairman. 

******** 
DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT - Elizabeth M. Ware, Dir. 

PLANNING BOARD 

Elizabeth M. Ware, Town Planner 

Leslie Brooks, Chairman 

The Planning Board has been faced with a number of challenges 
during the past year - challenges in rewriting the Town's Zoning 
By-Law and in the real estate market as well. The Board's 
membership had three changes this year. Attorney Catherine Savoie 
resigned in May 1992. Her position was filled by Patricia 
Hagadorn who is also president of the League of Women Voters and 
who has served as moderator for various League functions including 
candidates' night. In early summer 1992, architect Thomas Mayo 
resigned. His position was filled several months later by Attorney 
Timothy Perkins who is a long-time resident of the Town. These two 
new members join Wayne King, John Beagan, and Chairwoman Leslie 
Brooks in forming a strong board that balances town and business 
interest's in the review of real estate development projects. 
Additionally, the Board recently received the resignation of land 
surveyor and associate member Scott Richards. The Board is 
presently looking to fill this associate position which is needed 
for special permit applications. 

During the past year, the Planning Board has participated in two 
special town meetings which were held to address changes to the 

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Ipswich Protective Zoning By-Law. The first special town meeting 
was held in July 1992 to address an amendment to the By-Law which 
allowed for the reconstruction of a non-conforming property in the 
event of a total or partial destruction due to fire or other 
disaster. The Board worked closely with Town staff and the 
community to re-establish language which had been omitted from the 
1977 rewrite of the Protective Zoning By-Law. 

A fall special town meeting was held in October to address a number 
of major zoning amendments and to make some "housekeeping" 
revisions to the by-laws. The Board was successful in making 
amendments to the open space preservation zoning, accessory 
building and structure dimensional setbacks and definitions, 
addressing a need to allow storage tanks of gases, and in changing 
the dimensional regulations within the Rural Residence B (RRB) 
district. This latter issue involved active participation from a 
number of Great Neck residents and preparation of a comprehensive 
survey prepared by Kerry Mackin, a local resident. The Board is 
greatful to those "Neck" residents who participated and worked to 
successfully insure the passing of this by-law. 

Less successful were the Board's efforts to change the dimensional 
regulations of the business-zoned corridors along Routes 133 (Essex 
Road) and 1A (High Street) . With the present zoning similar to 
that of Route 1A in North Beverly - allowing curbcuts every 50' - 
the Boards believed that greater dimensional controls along these 
corridors would create safer vehicular travel, would encourage 
merging of lots for more comprehensive developments, and would 
provide a more aesthetic business corridor. The issues of "split 
lots" - lots designated within more than one zoning district and 
residential development within these business zones - were the main 
unresolved factors which contributed to the defeat of this article. 

In addition to busily working on zoning revisions, the Board was 
actively working with developers and bankers toward resolving often 
complex issues with long-standing development projects. The 
Ipswich Country Club project, which in 1991 was foreclosed upon by 
the Bank for Savings in Maiden, has been a particularly challenging 
and complex project for all parties. Regrettably, the Maiden Bank 
for Savings failed and was subsequently taken over by the FDIC in 
early 1992. Prior to this takeover, the Ipswich Savings Bank was 
designated as the lead bank for the project. Since the Ipswich 
Savings' active involvement with the project, the Board has worked 
to resolve outstanding and ever-present subdivision and special 
permit compliance issues with the banks, FDIC, the new club owners 
and the Homeowners' Association. 

Other projects that the Board and developers are working to 
complete include: Palamino Way, Meadow View Farm, Pond Edge Lane, 
Linebrook Estates II, Scott Hill Road, Jewett Hill, and Whispering 
Pines. These latter three properties were assumed by local banks. 
Additionally, the Board may have to act as developer on the 
completion of two subdivisions which developers have abandoned. 

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Finally, on a more positive note, the Board has been working to 
revise and update its regulations in anticipation of a revival in 
the real estate market. This revival may not be too far away. 
Several developers have been in to talk with the Board and its 
staff resulting in approximately four subdivisions "on the boards." 

******** 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Lillian V. North, Chairman 

One of the biggest tasks of the Conservation Commission in 1992 
came from six Notices of Intent for the repair of damage suffered 
by seawalls and revetments due to the Halloween storm of 1991. 
Another was the result of 17 Notice of Intent filed for the Ipswich 
Country Club. A third was the filing of seven Notices of Intent 
and two Requests for Determinations of Applicability for a total of 
11 lots for the new subdivision on Oakwood Knoll Road. 

The following is a list of 1992 activity compared with 1991 and 
1990, showing that 1992 was the busiest year so far. 

1990 1991 1992 

Notices of Intent: 
Orders of Conditions: 
Determinations of Applicability: 
Certificates of Compliance: 
Enforcement Orders: 

Three Notices of Intent were rejected, one was withdrawn, and one 
was pending. Three Requests for Determination of Applicability 
were rejected and one was pending. For the first time, the 
Commission began issuing fines for wetlands violations. In 1992, 
three fines were issued for eight violations for a total amount of 
$425.00. Site inspections increased dramatically; in some cases, 
eight in one day. 

After over eight years of dedicated service, Richard "Chip" Nylen 
left the Commission after devoting his time and efforts on one last 
project, the formulation of the Rules and Regulations of the 
Conservation Commission which went into effect on June 1, 1992. 

Andrew Agapow, a registered engineer and land surveyor, replaced 
"Chip" and has proven to be of immense help to the Commission, not 
only for -his invaluable expertise in the engineering field but for 
his assistance in setting up the Commission's new computer which 
was acquired in October of 1992. 

The Open Space and Recreation Committee, formerly a sub-committee 
of the Conservation Commission, became an entity of its own, having 
been voted at the Fall 1992 Special Town Meeting as a new Town 
Board. They will be responsible for updating the Open Space and 
Recreation Plan every five years. If it had not been for the 

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37 


23 


52 


33 


21 


49 


17 


12 


27 


10 


15 


23 


26 


14 


25 



former sub-committee, the Conservation Commission, due to its 
increased heavy workload, would have found it impossible to prepare 
the latest Plan. The Commission is grateful for the efforts of the 
sub-committee and will continue to support them in the future. 

******** 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Donald Curiale and Marjorie Robie, Co-Chairmen 

The Ipswich Historical Commission had an inspiring 1992. It worked 
very hard to achieve its goal for the year. 

The Commission presented the Mary Conley Preservation Award for 
voluntary preservation to Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Savoie of Liberty 
Street. First Honorable Mention was given to Mr. Daniel Lunt of 
High Street. A "Special Recognition Award" was given to Mr. & Mrs. 
Daniel Wendel of Jeffrey's Neck Road for a spectacular restoration 
of their home, the Ross Tavern House. 

In cooperation with the Ipswich Historical Society and Friends of 
the Library, Commission members Mary Conley and Sue Nelson arranged 
special Greek and Polish Ethnic Celebrations at the Winthrop 
School. These programs were part of a culmination of the 
"Comprehensive Nineteenth Century Industrial and Ethnic Survey" 
documented by the Commission. The programs highlighted the impact 
of these groups on our community through their social, political, 
and economic achievements. 

The Commission installed a Directory Sign at the intersection of 
Market and North Main Streets as part of its ongoing job of 
protection of streetscapes and landscapes of Ipswich. 

On a much larger scale, co-chairperson Marjorie Robie has 
undertaken the impossible. She organized a volunteer group to save 
and transcribe the valuable Fewkes, Darling, and Conley Ipswich 
Genealogy Papers. The tremendous project will be ongoing for the 
next three years. 

The Commission also worked with other groups to amend the State 
Building Code as it affects "Period" homes. The members worked 
with the Massachusetts Historical Commission, State Board of Codes 
and Regulations, the Building Inspector of Ipswich, and homeowners. 

Finally, the Commission would like to thank the Selectmen, 
officials at the Town Hall, especially Mr. Armand Michaud and his 
crew, Mr. Tim Mauser, and the Community for all their support. 



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******** 

MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 
Leslie F. Brooks, Chairman 

After a vote at the April Town Meeting in 1992, the Master Plan 
Commission's ranks were increased by the addition of a 
representative from the Ipswich Housing Authority. We now have a 
total of 12 members. 

The Master Plan Commission presented its proposal to create a 
Highway Business Zone along Routes 1A and 133 at the Special Fall 
Town Meeting in 1992. Unfortunately, despite support from the 
Board of Selectmen and some members of the Finance Committee, there 
was opposition from other Finance Committee members and a few 
members of the business community; and although the proposal 
received a majority vote, it did not receive the required two- 
thirds majority, and it failed. Efforts are currently underway to 
rework the proposal, with input from those who opposed it, and the 
MPC plans to present it again at the next Fall Town Meeting. 

It has been a difficult and somewhat frustrating year for the 
Master Plan Commission. In addition to a number of changes in 
membership, we have been plagued by poor meeting attendance and an 
apparent lack of focus. With input for the Board of Selectmen and 
the Town Manager, we hope to pursue a new agenda that addresses the 
interests of the Town, our appointing boards, and our members. 

******** 
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES - Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Elizabeth M. Dorman, Human Services Director 

The Recreation Department continued its mission to maintain a 
variety of programs, services, and activities that enhance the 
social, physical, and mental well-being of all our citizens by 
organizing programs for all age groups: children, teens, adults, 
and senior citizens. Included were traditional playground 
activities, evening adult sports, February vacation events, dances, 
community band, and a variety of out-of-town trips. 

Community-wide civic and family events offered included the July 
4th Parade & Field Day held with help from the VFW, the annual 
Ipswich Marathon, a Triathalon organized by Rick Silverman, a raft 
race and vessel parade as part of Riverfest, a Halloween Parade 
and program, and the Memorial Day Parade facilitated by local 
veteran's groups. Cooperation with the Ipswich Community Chamber of 
Commerce produced Summerfest activities, Santa's arrival by boat at 
Town Hall and a parade to Town Hill for treelighting ceremonies 
followed by caroling, indoor refreshments and entertainment, and a 
pancake breakfast for Ipswich Caring. 



-89- 






Summer swim lessons continued at Don Bosco pool, and afternoon open 
swim time again allowed family use at nominal fees. Golf lessons 
for teens were again provided by the Ipswich Country Club, and 
tennis lessons were scheduled at the high school courts. Children's 
Summer Theatre was again offered to those interested, culminating 
in a performance at St. Joseph's hall, and a series of kids crafts 
classes were held at the Memorial Building. Also repeated were 
Adventure Camp for middle-schoolers, special needs summer 
recreation within the playground program, student aides for swim 
and playground, lifeguard coverage at Pavilion Beach, and parking 
attendants at Crane's Beach. New programs of women's softball and 
basketball were very successful. 

Plans were drawn and materials purchased to refurbish the storage 
shed at Bialek Park and are awaiting volunteer help to complete the 
project. Handicap-accessible toilet facilities are also planned for 
the structure when funding can be realized. Site improvements 
initiated by the K-Club and neighborhood families began at the 
Father Rye Playground in preparation for new play equipment to be 
funded by local contributions. 

Many local groups used the Memorial Building for meetings and 
registrations, and two dog training groups paid fees to conduct 
classes. Friday evenings it functioned as a Teen Center led by 
volunteer Marcia Ford who organized a Teen Board that met regularly 
to plan activities and fund-raisers. A new pool table provided by 
a contribution from the Old Ipswich Days Committee, a CD/Tape Deck 
provided by the First National Bank, and several donated game 
tables have enhanced the offerings. Teens referred by the court 
system performed community service at the site. 

The Recreation Director certified several youth sports coaches in 
soccer, football, and baseball programs after evening training 
sessions and issued numerous permits for field use, tennis courts, 
and evening lights. 

The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation Director met j 
regularly throughout the year to discuss programs, facilities, and 
policies as well as to plan for the future. 
A Community Youth Review Board of interested adults met monthly for j 
breakfast to discuss local teen issues. 

The wide variety of programs and activities that continue to be 
provided are possible in part by the generous donation of time and 
funding from many local individuals, businesses, and organizations. 
Without such support our offerings would be greatly diminished in 
times of increasing fiscal constraint. 



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******** 

:OUNCIL-ON-AGING 
tfinfred Hardy, Chairman 

^ variety of programs for Ipswich seniors were provided through 
Local Council-on-Aging services. The Drop-in Center on Central 
Street open on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. offered reading 
aaterials, games, puzzles, refreshments, and informal gatherings 
:or senior socializing. Two part-time hostesses, Betty Citroni and 
Ernestine Gillis, were on duty there regularly. 

tegular programs at the center included crafts groups, bingo games, 
Dlood pressure clinics, and the "Silver Strands", a vocal group 
chat performed for other senior groups. Occasional speakers and 
special guests offered information on a variety of topics, and 
social gatherings were organized for holidays and monthly birthday 
Dbservances. Trips and other activities available to senior 
citizens were publicized at the center, and tickets for Town- 
sponsored trips organized by the Recreation Department were sold 
chere for the convenience of all residents. 

i Diane Mitchell, the grant-funded Outreach Coordinator, worked with 
i seniors individually to provide counseling on medical, financial, 
j and legal issues, and to help them secure additional services they 
needed for such concerns. She coordinated a number of special 
Dfferings including intergeneration projects between seniors and 
elementary school children and speakers on a variety of issues of 
interest to seniors. She originated a monthly newsletter, secured 
its funding, regularly produced it, and arranged for distribution 
Df 1000 copies to local seniors. She also worked directly with the 
Friends of the Elderly group which raised funds for goods and 
services not provided in regular budget appropriations. Included 
were an October membership meeting at the Hellenic Center, a 
Christmas Party for 2 50 seniors at the VFW, and new carpeting for 
the move to a new site. 

Town contributions to Action, Inc. provided quarterly disbursements 
of government surplus food items such as butter, cheese, beans, dry 
milk, flour, etc. Fuel assistance was also dispensed to those who 
are needy and meet qualification standards. Contributions to Senior 
Home Health Care Services provided support for elderly still living 
in their homes who needed homemakers or other kinds of individual 
help to facilitate their independent living arrangements. 

In December, the Drop-In Center moved to another site located just 
two doors up on Central Street. The new senior center is slightly 
larger, has a separate office area for privacy, and features a 
ramped entrance that is more readily accessible to all who come. 

The seven member Council-on-Aging met monthly with the Outreach 
Coordinator and Human Services Director to discuss issues and plan 
offerings for the senior citizen population. 



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******** 

DEPARTMENT OF UTILITIES - Donald R. Stone, Sr., Director 

UTILITIES DEPARTMENT - Donald R. Stone, Sr., Director 

Electric Division - Donald R. Stone, Sr. , Manager 

Generation at the Power Plant for 1992 was 2,592,945 kWH. The 1992 
annual peak was 16,670 and was reached on January 16 at 6:16 PM. 
Distribution continued a maintenance and upgrade program that has 
been established over the last nine years. The Department sold 
78,362,223 kWH, an increase of 3% over 1991. We saw an increase in 
the number of electrical services of 55, bringing the total number 
of electric meters installed to 5,984. The annual study of 
municipal electric companies in Massachusetts showed that our 
residential rates remain among the lowest in the state, ranking #2 
for average residential customers. 

Water Division - James E. Chase, Town Engineer 

Charles Mantsourani, Water Filtration Supt. 
The exterior surface of the 3 million gallon water storage tank at 
the top of Town Hill was sand-blasted and painted this year. The 
interior surface will be done in the Spring of 1993. 

One extension was added to our distribution system in 1992: 
Oakwood Knoll Rd. - 4 000' - 8" PVC 



1989 1990 1991 1992 



New Meters installed 
Meters Replaced 
Services Turned Off 
Services Turned On 
New Services 
Services Discontinued 
Hydrants Installed 
Hydrants Replaced 
New Water Mains Installed 
Total Length of Mains 

WATER SERVICES 
Metered Services 
Unmetered Services 

WATER USAGE - MG 
Dow's Reservoir 
Brown's Well 
Essex Road Well 
Fellow's Road Well 
Mile Lane Well 
Winthrop Wells 

TOTAL WATER USAGE 
Highest Day: 07/27/89 





82 




70 




33 




40 




181 




71 




326 




293 




98 




73 




83 




74 




142 




152 




93 




95 




58 




40 




19 




38 




1 



















1 




8 




1 




10 




4 




1 




1 







d 


730' 


4 


r 045' 




105' 


4 


r 000' 


463 


,490' 


467 


,535' 


467 


r 640' 


471 


P 640' 


3 


,932 


4 


r 002 


4 


,034 


4 


,040 




87 




57 




56 




54 


252 


.286 


257 


.948 


260 


.499 


216 


.276 


31 


.072 


54 


.887 


74 


.785 


84. 


996 


15 


.525 


23 


.190 


14 


.268 


6. 


323 


19 


.479 


36 


893 


22 


692 


33. 


351 


6 


.557 


19 


273 


18. 


555 


20. 


747 





.712 


7 


438 


36 


770 


45. 


983 


325 


.351 


399 


629 


427. 


569 


407. 


676 



-92- 



Highest Day: 07/18/90 
highest Day: 06/27/91 
Highest Day: 11/02/92 

Sewer Division - Timothy J. Henry, Superintendent 

The wastewater treatment facility, located on Fowlers Lane, was 
upgraded in 1976 to provide secondary treatment for the community. 
Since its upgrade the plant has operated satisfactorily, with some 
problems associated with the solids processing and disposal. 

In 1991 the Town built the compost facility at the end of Town Farm 
Road, to deal with the disposal of the wastewater sludge. In 1992 
the State Department of Environmental Protection determined that 
the Town's compost met Type I classification, which allows for 
unrestricted use of the material. Since the classification, 
finished compost has been set aside at the Town's Highway Garage 
for use by the people of Ipswich, at no charge. 

Although this project has been a success, it has not addressed the 
problem of sludge processing. Before the sludge can be composted, 
the solids need to be dewatered. This has been done, since the 
plant was built, by two vacuum filters. This equipment is not only 
old and in need of work, but it is outdated and cannot meet the 
requirements of the facility. The Department is seeking funds for 
the Reed System Project which will dewater the sludge naturally 
instead of mechanically. This system will allow the plant to 
process sludge more economically than the present system and will 
also meet the treatment facility's requirements for sludge 
processing. 

During 1992 the Town's NPDES (National Pollution Discharge 
Elimination System) permit, which is issued jointly by the Federal 
Environmental Protection Agency and the State of Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Protection, was renewed. The new 
permit made significant changes to such parameters as chlorine 
residula, fecal coliform levels, ammonia, dissolved oxygen and 
additional effluent toxicity testing. For the most part the 
facility can comply with these new limits without an significant 
changes. However, the new requirements for chlorine residuals and 
fecal coliform levels cannot be met without major facility 
modifications. These modifications will require significant 
capital outlay in the next year and come at a time when the 
department struggles with upgrading a facility which is approaching 
the end of its design life. 



******** 

IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY - Eleanor M. Gaunt, Head Librarian 

Circulation 

Library circulation continued to grow during 1992 reaching a record 

105,474 items — an increase of 3,033 over the previous year. This 

-93- 



figure breaks down to 99,633 books and magazines and 5,841 tapes, 
videos and CD's. We borrowed 1,03 6 books for Ipswich residents 
from other libraries and issued 1,143 new library cards. Current 
registrations are 8,392. There were 520 visitors to the Archives 
Room last year, and the Reference Department recorded an average of 
11 queries per day, for a year-end total of 3,179 transactions. 

Collections 

New items purchased for the library during 1992 were: 2,962 books, 
65 audiocassettes including books on tape, six videocassettes and 
79 compact discs. At year's end, there were 66,806 books, 1,536 
LP's, 733 audiocassettes, 153 videos and 256 CD's. 

Board of Library Trustees 

The Library's most outstanding achievement of 1992 was the 
construction of a wheelchair ramp for handicap accessibility. 
Dedication of the completed ramp was held in July. Total cost of 
the project was $39,289 of which $27, 867. came from accrued State 
Library Grant Funds and $11,422 from Library Trust Funds. The four 
benches were gifts of four generous donors whose names appear on a 
plaque inside the library. 

The Board accepted with regret the resignation of Crocker Snow who 
had served for 13 years, and whose many contributions to the 
expansion of the library were acknowledged. At their June meeting, 
the Board welcomed newly appointed member Marion Frost. The Goals 
and Evaluation Committee, established in 1991, has undertaken a 
long range planning process for the Library. 

Children's Library Report 

The annual Checker and Chess Tournament was held during the 
February vacation. Visits to the library for special programs 
instruction were held for Nursery Schools, Kindergarten classes and 
Scout Troops. Regular monthly visits are held for children from a 
nearby private school. 

"The Caravan," a group from the University of New Hampshire, 
presented a live performance of stories, songs and games outside 
the library under the shade of our trees where people enjoyed 
picnic lunches and the fine presentation of the players. 

In honor of our U.S. Olympic Athletes, the library hosted the 
Olympic Summer reading program. Over 500 children joined our 
reading team. The afternoon craft programs for grade school 
emphasized world awareness. Wednesday night Pa jama Story Time took 
place during the months of July and August. 

Local performers donated their time and talent for three programs 
during the Summer: "Babies and Books"; folk singing; puppet shows. 

A morning coffee and orientation was held for anyone interested in 
learning about the children's programs. Due to the large number of 
registrations, class size for the three weekly storytimes was 
increased by 20%. 

-94- 



rhe Friends of the Library continue to provide those "extras" for 
the library, such as books on tape, videocassettes and Museum 
Passes. There were 348 museum visits made by Ipswich families 
during 1992. In addition to their annual Christmas party, the 
Friends sponsored a number of programs at the library, and co- 
sponsored the very well received series of "Fireside Chats", tapes 
of which are available in the Library. The library is indeed 
grateful for their support. 

Gifts 

Another generous donation was received from Leonard A. Heurlin, 

enabling us to build not only the business reference collection, 

but to enhance the electronic databases on CD-Rom presently 

available in the reference Department. His generosity is greatly 

appreciated. 

Ipswich residents now have available for their use a Macintosh 
personal computer, with printer, which was donated to the library 
by Robert Katz of the Archimedes Foundation of Rockport. 

Remember, your library is here to serve all your information needs 
and provide you with your pleasure reading. 

******** 
FINANCE DEPARTMENT - Donna M. Walsh, Finance Director 

ACCOUNTING OFFICE/TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Donna M. Walsh, CPA 

The Town Accountant's Office consists of two full-time staff people 
and a full-time Town Accountant. The Accountant's Office is 
responsible for processing the payroll for Town employees, for 
processing all the invoices for vendor payments, and for preparing 
all W-2's and 1099 's at year end in accordance with IRS 
regulations. 

In addition, the Town Accountant's Office maintains all of the 
accounting records for the Town's revenues and expenditures and 
assists in providing information on benefits available to Town 
employees. 

The Town Accountant coordinates the annual independent audit of the 
Town's financial statements, which was completed in October 1992 
for the year ended June 30, 1992. 

The financial results for FY92 were better than expected. The 
undesignated fund balance per the audited financial statements went 
from a deficit of ($343,677) at the end of FY91 to a surplus of 
$903,672 at June 30, 1992. In addition, free cash, as certified by 
the Massachusetts Department of Revenue, went from a deficit of 
($640,342) at June 30, 1992 to a surplus of $180,585 at June 30, 
1992. 

-95- 



The favorable financial outcome was the result of many factors, 
including increased collections on overdue taxes, refunds of health 
insurance deposits from prior years due to a change in plans, and 
funds received from the federal government to reimburse the Town 
for the damage done by Hurricane Bob and the Coastal storm. In 
addition, the winter was mild which left money in the snow and ice 
budget; and yet another change in health plans resulted in some 
current year savings. 

Although FY92 was better than expected, the Town will still have to 
find creative ways to maintain Town services and provide for needed 
repairs and capital outlays. 

******** 

TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 
Virginia M. Cleary 

The year of 1992 brought with it our beautiful teal blue beach 
stickers which began selling like "hot cakes." The first day, 
January 2, we sold 64, making everyone promise to go for a swim 
straight away. In total, 5,616 beach stickers, 275 fishing 
stickers, 27 horse van stickers, 100 temporary stickers, and 157 
seasonal launch stickers were purchased. Wow! were we busy or 
what? 

The boat excise and personal property are now able to be left on 
the computer from year to year. This will help save time in 
posting and researching any problems. 

Due to the Town's new reorganization, a full-time position was , 
eliminated and a part-time position was created. We welcome Lee 
Boutin and the help and eagerness she affords. 

A total of 860 municipal lien certificates were processed. 

The following bills were sent to taxpayers: 

Real Estate 10,427 

Personal Property 1,091 

Excise 13,142 

Boat Excise 587 

Tax Collector's receipts turned over to the Treasurer: 

$11,635,683.84 

Treasurer's Tax Title Redemptions: $389,503.00 

Treasurer's Total Receipts: $33,504,845.39 

Treasurer's Total Expenditures: $32,125,864.44 



-96- 



******** 

ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property 
January 1, 1992, was $888,172,293. 

The valuation of the Town by Class is: 

$ % 

Class 1 Residential 788,657,300 88.7955 

Class 11 Open Space - - 

Class 111 Commercial 54,268,743 6.1102 

Class IV Industrial 33,145,900 3,7319 

Personal Property 12,100,350 1.3624 

The Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 1993 was $12.62 per thousand for all 
property classes. 

******** 

TOWN CLERK 

Frances A. Richards 

The Town Clerk's office was extremely busy during 1992 with census, 
elections, town meetings and licensing, plus an increase in routine 
daily office transactions. The office continues to serve as an 
information center by phone as well as in the office. This year a 
new computer was purchased for the office to take care of the 
tremendous data base. Recording, updating and printing the census 
mailers, voter lists, street list, jury list, school list, dog 
list, dog license renewal letters, clerk's budget, town meeting 
minutes and all other lists requested from the clerk's office is 
done on our own computer. 

For the first time in many years, election constables were 
appointed by the Town Clerk with recommendations from the Chief of 
Police and the Town Manager. The constables did an outstanding job 
at all the elections with considerable savings in the elections 
budget. 

Town Clerk Frances A. Richards was appointed June 1st for a three 
year term and has completed the second year program at Salve Regina 
College for certification as a municipal clerk. 

A great deal of appreciation goes to my hard-working clerk, Lee 
Graves and to Finance Director Donna Walsh for all her support. 



-97- 



147 


150 


156 


101 


117 


106 


108 


70 


83 



570 


590 


614 


67 


57 


56 


552 


526 


567 


32 


33 


46 



1992 Population from the Town Census as of June 1, 1992 - 12.332, 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past three years: 

1990 1991 19 92 
Births 
Deaths 
Marriages 

There were 68 females and 88 males born to Ipswich residents in 
1992. Of the total number of deaths recorded (45 females, 61 
males) , 100 were residents. Of the 83 marriages recorded in 
Ipswich, 31 took place elsewhere; in 20 marriages, one party was 
non-resident and in 2 marriages, both parties were non-resident. 

Dog Licenses 1990 1991 1992 

Males 

Females 

Spayed Females 

Kennels 

The 1992 census found 1511 dogs in Ipswich; 1237 dogs and 46 
kennels were licensed. 

Shellfish Licenses 

& Permits 1990 1 991 1992 

Resident Yearly 
Resident Family 
Resident Commercial 
Non-Resident Yearly 
Non-Resident Yrly-Over 65 
Non-Resident Daily 

22 Lifetime Permits "Over 60 Free Recreational" were also issued to 
residents in 1992. 

Revenue Report for the Town Clerks Office - 1992 

Antiques & Old Metals Licenses $ 35.00 

Auction Permits 4,300.00 

Automatic Amusement Licenses 1 , 650 . 00 

Boating Fines 950.00 

Beer & Wine Licenses 5,400.00 

Booklets Sold 294 . 50 

Bowling Alley Licenses 80.00 

By-Laws, Maps Sold 1,173.00 

Class I Licenses 200.00 

Class II Licenses 1,700.00 

Class III Licenses 100.00 

Certified Copy Fees 5,062.90 

Common Victuallers Licenses 2,050.00 

Conservation Fines 75.00 

Dog Fines 2,795.00 



-98- 



154 


132 


142 


110 


145 


109 


93 


107 


149 


24 


33 


24 




5 


11 


23 


19 


45 



Dog Licenses 13,199.25 

Flammables Licenses 750.00 

Liquor Licenses (All Alcoholic) 27,900.00 

Marriage Licenses 1 , 605 . 00 

Miscellaneous Fees 42.30 

One-Day All Alcoholic Licenses 3,160.00 

One-Day Beer & Wine Licenses 80.00 

Raffle Permits 210.00 

Recording Fees 3,687.00 

Seasonal All Alcoholic Licenses 2,350.00 

Shellfish Permits 27 , 087 . 00 

Sporting Licenses 8,921.50 

Street Lists Sold 1,441.00 

Sunday Entertainment Licenses 1,325.00 

Taxi Licenses 110.00 

Weekday Entertainment Licenses 1,500.00 

Total $119,233.45 

Sporting Licenses 1992 

Fishing 214 

Free Fishing (handicapped) 10 

Hunting 96 

Free Hunting (handicapped) 

Sporting 128 

Free Sporting (Over 70) 32 

Trapping 

Archery Stamps 4 8 

Waterfowl Stamps 119 

Wildlands Stamps 427 

Total 1074 

Revenue sent in to Division of Fisheries & Wildlife $8,921.50 

******** 

ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

Board of Registrars: Peter M. Ross, Chairman 

Mary Maloney 

Edmund Traverso 

Frances A. Richards, Clerk 

The 1992 election cycle was the most extraordinary in recent 
history. The presidential election year cycle is always a 
difficult one with the Presidential Primary, the State Primary and 
the State Election. Further adding to the burden on clerks and 
registrars this year, there was a formal third party participating 
in primaries for the first time since 1976. The name chosen by the 
new party, the Independent Voter's Party, created mass confusion 
for all the voters who always referred to their voting status as 
"independent". The Board of Registrars were left to resolve the 
resulting chaos and confusion. The Independent Voter's Party did 
not receive three percent of the vote in the November State 
Election which they needed to continue as a third party. 



-99- 



In addition, this year the certification process was complicated by 
new laws allowing voters to sign for any number of candidates 
running for the same seat, and a need to allow congressional 
candidates to obtain signatures from outside the district from 
which they were seeking election. 

The Board of Registrars held twenty-four meetings to certify 
nomination papers and petitions, register new voters, check voters 
at town meetings and tally the results for all the elections. In 
June, over a hundred more Initiative Petitions (I,J,M,0) were 
certified by the Board. Joanne Banville was appointed again by the 
Board of Registrars to serve as Deputy Registrar at the Ipswich 
High School. 

Election Constables were appointed in 1992 to replace the police 
officers at the polls. The following Election Constables were 
appointed in 1992: Andrew Agapow, Bruce Bryant, Bonita Sue Eaton, 
Richard Freeman, Ronald Graves, John Meers, Kenneth Murphy, Edmund 
Traverso and Richard Walker. 

Town Meetings & Elections for 1992: 

March 10, 1992 - Presidential Primary with 2758 votes cast 

(1761 Democrat, 991 Republican, 6 Independent) 
April 6, 1992 - Annual Town Meeting with 34 Articles 
April 13, 1992 - Annual Town Election with 2446 votes cast 
July 27, 1992 - Special Town Meeting with 4 articles 
September 15, 1992 - State Primary with 2544 votes cast 

(1710 Democrat, 834 Republian, Independent) 
October 17, 1992 - First Saturday Special Town Meeting with 

21 articles 
November 3, 1992 - State Election with 7177 votes cast 

(88% of the total registered voters) 

Registered Voters as of November 1, 1992 - 8129 

(662 new voters registered before the State Election) 



PRECINCT 


DEMOCRAT 


REPUBLICAN 


UNENROLLED 


TOTAL 


1 


451 


476 


1163 


2090 


2 


505 


397 


1261 


2163 


3 


316 


335 


1220 


1871 


4 


488 


323 


1194 


2005 


Totals 


1760 


1531 


4838 


8129 



Ipswich Results from the State Election - November 3, 1992 

BUSH and QUAYLE Republican 2514 

*CLINTON and GORE Democrat 2862 

FULANI and MUNOZ New Alliance Party 3 

HAGELIN and TOMPKINS Natural Law Party 2 

LaROUCHE,JR. and BEVEL. . .LaRouche for President 1 

MARROU and LORD Libertarian 28 



-100- 



PEROT and STOCKDALE Independent 1715 

PHILLIPS and KNIGHT, JR. . Independent Voters Party... 3 
OTHER 9 

•Elected 

?he Board of Registrars wishes to express its sincere appreciation 
:o the League of Women Voters for all their efforts in getting a 
i juorum for the Annual and Special Town Meetings and promoting voter 
registration. 



******** 



[PSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 

^eorgina Jill Traverso, Chairman 

During 1992, and Ipswich Arts Council sponsored four art exhibits; 
iwo of them were held at the Hall-Haskell House, with the 
cooperation of the Hall-Haskell House Committee. A banner was 
iesigned and made to hang outside the house when it is open. A 
Dercentage of the sale price of any work sold at exhibits there is 
jiven to the Friends of the Little Red House to be used toward 
further restoration. In June, an exhibit entitled "Ipswich in Art" 
presented work of local painters and photographers depicting 
Epswich scenes. 

For the Ipswich River Festival in June, the Arts Council presented, 
at the Middle School, a show of work by students in the Middle and 
iigh Schools and by Ipswich students who attend other schools. 

The annual Ipswich Art Exhibit to show the work of Ipswich artists 
rfas held at the Middle School cafeteria July 25 - 28. At the 
opening reception, Charles Wayne, the chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, presented prizes totalling $1300 to Sarah Bastille, 
Maxwell Frank, S. Rachael Shannehan, Ann Lovett, Steve Smith, and 
Katherine Zwick. During September, a show of other works by the 
prize winners at the Art Exhibit was presented at the Hall-Haskell 
House. 

Grants of funds from the Massachusetts Cultural Council were 
awarded to William Gaudreau for folk-art woodwork; Jane Harold for 
a lecture and slide show on the work of Ipswich painter Arthur 
Wesley Dow; Kristen Ledson for a dance performance which was 
presented during the Ipswich River Festival; and the Ipswich 
Recreation Department for a Childrens' Summer Theatre Workshop. In 
the October granting period, an application was submitted for the 
1993 annual Art Exhibit; no other applications were received. 
During the year, the Ipswich School Department received PASS 
funding for students to attend the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
the North Shore Music Theatre. 

The Arts Council also sponsored a showing of childrens' films that 
was held at the Winthrop School during the February vacation. 

New officers, elected in October with terms to start on January 1, 

-101- 



1993, are Diane Faissler, Chairman, and William I. Rogers, Co- 
Chairman, to replace Georgina Jill Traverso, Chairman, and Jon 
Aaron, Co-Chairman. 

******** 

OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Jim Berry, Chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee 

The Open Space Committee, re-established in 1991 as a subcommittee 
of the Conservation Commission, continued its work in 1992 to draft 
the third five-year Open Space and Recreation Plan for the Town of 
Ipswich. Because the State's guidelines for these plans were 
revised in 1990, the committee had to draft a new plan from 
scratch. This ended up being a two-year project. 

The committee held twelve public meetings in 1992. One of these, 
on May 27, was a public hearing of the Conservation Commission at 
which the committee presented its draft goals and objectives to 
members of the combined Town boards and commissions. In addition, 
the committee ran a table at the Ipswich River Festival on June 20 
to get citizen reaction to the draft goals and objectives. 

By year's end, the draft plan had been through several revisions 
and was centered around six major goals: (1) preserve the 
historical and rural character of the town; (2) protect the water 
supply; (3) protect wetlands and other critical habitats; (4) 
preserve significant land for open space and recreation; (5) 
provide recreation opportunities appropriate and accessible to all 
age groups; and (6) promote a cooperative and regional approach to 
open space and resource protection. As the new year began, the 
plan was awaiting approval by the State Division of Conservation 
Services. 

Though the plan is geared to the years 1993-1997, two of its action 
items were accomplished at the October 1992 Town Meeting. One was 
to overhaul the Town's Open Space Preservation Zoning By-Law. The 
other was to establish the heretofore ad hoc Open Space Committee 
as a standing committee of seven appointed members; hence this 
first annual report of the committee to the Town. 

The twelve members of the ad hoc committee who developed the plan 
over the first two years were Jim Berry, Carolyn Britt, Hester 
Clapp, Betty Dorman, Larry Eliot, Roxann Giddings, Dorothy 
Monnelly, Ed Monnelly, Barbara Ostberg, Glenn Pacella-Hazelton, 
David Standley, and Betsy Ware. 

******** 

COASTAL POLLUTION CONTROL COMMITTEE 
Robert Cram, Chairman 

The committee has identified 110 sampling sites and has analyzed 
over 500 samples in 1992. 



-102- 



The Water Filtration Plant, the Wastewater Treatment Plant, and the 
DMF lab in Salem have performed the analysis. The work is 
partially funded by a grant of $1,500 awarded to the committee by 
MassBays. 

We have identified septic systems, storm drains, domestic animals 
and wildlife, boating, the treatment plant, and pollution from 
other towns as sources of fecal coliform in Ipswich waters. We 
have been able to determine the magnitude of some of these sources, 
but others are proving difficult to define other than in a general 
way. 

The committee supports the current efforts being made to upgrade 
the Wastewater Treatment Plant and expect a measurable benefit to 
the coastal area. We have been encouraged by the prospects for 
demonstration funding for a boat pumpout station, alternative 
disposal systems, and stormwater management. 

******** 

HALL-HASKELL HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEE 
Stephanie Gaskins, Terri Stephens, Co-chairmen 

The year 1992 was another exciting year for the Hall-Haskell House. 
Together with the Ipswich Arts Council, we launched more than ten 
exhibits. The Arts Council was responsible for the design and 
production of a new arts banner. Vivian Endicott restored the 
grill work that holds the banner. The house functioned as an arts 
center from spring through fall. Exhibitors represented all ages 
ranging from high school students to professional artists. 

There was a broad array of styles to please many palettes. 
Ceramics, photography, watercolor, acrylics, oils, sculpture, and 
drawing were all exhibited. Paintings of realistic landscapes 
along the North Shore to multi-media contemporary interpretations 
were presented. 

The artists exhibiting were Mary Weatherall, Thorpe Feidt, Bonnie 
Warwick, Sally Kuhn, Candice Stella, Mary Fosdick, Jane Harold, 
Pauline Boudreau, Kristin Ledsen, Ellie Norris, and others. 

Restoration to the interior of the house continues. Eric Galicki 
upgraded our electrical system, but more work needs to be done in 
this area. David Humphrey continues his plumbing services. Mike 
Tolvanen repaired the roof and also completed restoration of the 
downstairs floors. He also restored the downstairs hearth. 

Local designers are in the process of creating an outdoor garden. 
All in all it has been a grand year, and we thank all artists, 
volunteers and townspeople for their support and contributions. 
Proceeds continue to benefit restoration of the house. Thanks for 
making this a successful year. 

******** 

-103- 



COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
William Varrell, Chairman 

Although local support for commuter rail continues strong, 1992 was 
a relatively quiet year for the Commuter Rail Committee. Realizing 
that the T has few funds for new programs that would involve 
additional expense, our recent activities have been in the area of 
expressing our opposition to the surcharge for tickets purchased on 
the train, and formal requests for more frequent use of the station 
and train P. A. systems to explain unusual delays, and to advise 
occasional users how to avoid the surcharge. 

The rail committee was invited to participate in the recent update 
relating to resumption of service to Newburyport ; however, we see 
no indication that the required reconstruction for resumption of 
service will occur in the near future. In the meantime, the so- 
called study and engineering design for this project, with its 
corresponding significant expense, seems to have continued far 
beyond reasonableness. 

In the event that ongoing decisions that will directly affect 
Ipswich are still being made, we want to insure that the costs that 
increase by millions each year result in the safest possible right 
of way through our town. At the very least, we must insure that 
the right of way is adequately fenced and that the railroad has a 
formal education program to educate local residents about the 
danger of high speed trains that will be moving through the densely 
populated part of town with five grade crossings, up to a dozen 
times a day. 

The rail committee continues to be actively involved in maintaining 
the flowers at the station and keeping the area generally free of 
litter and weeds. For all that the plants do amazingly well in the 
very poor soil available, we do have an accelerating problem with 
vandalism that is not obvious at other nearby stations. We 
currently have a new problem with graffiti, last year on several 
occasions plants were destroyed in less than a week, and in 
December two major trees on the parking lot islands were destroyed 
through thoughtless vandalism. 

Next summer your rail committee will once more adopt the railroad 
station landscaping in hopes that our efforts will have the respect 
consistent with the continued strong use and support of local 
commuter rail. 

******** 

IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Catherine Cecil, Chairman 

As the Ipswich Housing Authority (IHA) continued its efforts to 
provide safe, decent, affordable housing, state budget cuts reduced 
funding to tenants, landlords, and the IHA. The state raised rent 
levels for all its tenants, including the elderly and families. 

-104- 



Tenants of private landlords in scattered sites, and elderly 
tenants at Cable Gardens, were forced to pay even further rent 
increases, sometimes more than an extra $100 per month. In 
addition, new income limits for these tenants, who are even 
stricter than in other state or federal programs, forced 14 people 
out of the program altogether. Many IHA tenants voiced their 
disapproval of these cuts by signing a petition sent to the 
Legislature. After holding a hearing on these rent increases, the 
Board of Selectmen expressed its concern over the increases in a 
letter to the Governor. 

The IHA was awarded funding for 2 5 private rental certificates 
under the new federal Family Self Sufficiency Program. Tenants 
selected for the Program will work toward becoming self sufficient 
within five years when they will "graduate" from receiving 
subsidies of any kind. Many tenants have applied to the Program, 
and the initial interviews have been conducted. 

The IHA also lent its support to the Town's efforts to garner 
federal housing funds through the Essex County HOME Consortium. 
After providing information and meeting with Town and County 
officials, the IHA submitted comments in support of the Town's 
plan. The IHA also suggested an increase in rental assistance, as 
well as efforts to target mortgage assistance to those who have 
recently become independent of subsidies through the IHA's Family 
Self Sufficiency Program. 

The IHA was granted the authority to appoint one member to the 
Ipswich Master Plan Commission after a vote at Town Meeting. The 
IHA then appointed Sara O'Connor to serve on the Commission. 

Despite cuts in administrative fees, and new restrictions on the 
use of modernization funds, the IHA continued its efforts to repair 
and spruce up its property. An independent survey deemed Agawam 
Village in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act; and 
the IHA maintenance staff worked on the sewer system, the Caroline 
Avenue Community Hall, and the lock system. 

The IHA's efforts to build new elderly and family developments have 
been suspended because of state fiscal problems. 

The IHA Board members include Catherine Cecil, Joseph Brady, Robert 
Como, Sara O'Connor, and Arthur Weagle. The Executive Director is 
Raymond Daniels, Sr. 

******** 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

IPSWICH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Cynthia D. Quinn, Chairperson 

This year there were notable and promising developments in the 
schools. Parents have been demanding change, and teachers have 
been charting new directions. The Choice program, which encourages 



-105- 



students from other districts to enroll here based on space 
availability, provided a way to improve and strengthen our schools. 

In every area of the school system's operation, the principals and 
staff are making improvements in writing, curriculum, and 
assessment. There has been a focus on collaboration in the area of 
library and technology integration as well as an analysis of 
current progress with the inclusion of special education students 
in regular classes. 

At the Whipple Memorial School, one big change is the new 
principal, Ron Toleos. In addition to curriculum and staff 
adjustments, the teachers and students now enjoy the new IBM 
computer lab. Some initiatives taken on by the parents include 
having parent volunteers supporting the middle School similar to 
programs at the Winthrop and Doyon Schools. The elevator and 
handicap access projects have been completed. 

For a second year in a row, the Ipswich High School football team 
won the Superbowl . As part of a course taught by members of the 
High School staff, the Ipswich Cooperative Bank operates a branch 
office of the bank in order to train interested students. 
Construction of the new athletic field has started, and Ipswich and 
Georgetown have agreed to have cooperative teams in several sports. 

The school aged extended day care program which provides both 
before and after school day care is housed at the Doyon School. To 
simulate real world situations, students at the school are 
operating their school store. Some of the teachers are introducing 
the use of portfolios as an additional method to assess learning. 
The Doyon School had stage areas, a guidance office, and a teacher 
workroom made into classrooms. Parental involvement remains strong 
as the need for additional classroom space grows. 

The Winthrop School also has a school store, portfolio assessment, 
and a parent volunteer group, Volunteers in Schools (VIS) . There 
has been no lack of public support and commitment in our students. 
Between and within the two elementary schools is an increased 
effort on the part of staff members for greater teamwork and 
integrated curriculum. 

Even though the Doyon School override failed last spring and the 
enrollment numbers at all levels increased, the school system 
budget decreased. Finding adequate classroom space continued to be 
the most pressing problem facing the pupils in 1992. 

As the administrators, teachers and our support staff encourage 
improvement, the student is still the customer. Providing the 
highest quality educational opportunities to all children, our 
schools are succeeding despite a decrease in funding. Educating 
the students is a big responsibility, one that involves increasing 
the quality of educational experiences for our children and long- 
term commitment. 

-106- 






SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Richard F. Thompson, Superintendent 

Some wise person said "the future isn't what it used to be". That 
person was probably right since our most visionary future keeps 
unfolding with more changes than we ever dreamed possible. Our 
grandest scenario, whether in literature or Buck Rogers comics, 
falls short of the actual changes that are impacting our society. 
The purpose of schools is to prepare our students to deal 
successfully in the future, as well as in the present. Our 
challenge is to identify the skills, knowledge and attitudes that 
are going to be the most useful to our students and to society in 
the future. 

To help plan for the future, we have relied on our experiences and 
knowledge of the past. The problem with this approach is that the 
past and present no longer add up to the future. The changes our 
society is experiencing are not limited to known domains. J. Paul 
3etty said, "In times of rapid change, experience is your worst 
enemy." Getty spoke as a businessman, but his words may be true for 
sducation as well. The Ipswich Schools have gone through more 
change in the last year than we have experienced in any other 
single year of the previous decade. Let me recapture for you some 
of the most significant changes this year. 

Population: Enrollment continues to grow at a more rapid pace in 
the Ipswich schools than predicted regionally or nationally for 
school growth. From October 1991 to 1992, our schools grew by 66 
students. This 3% increase in our population will utilize 3% more 
resources which must come from the existing budget. Additionally, 
the projections are that the Ipswich Schools will keep growing at 
a rapid rate. 

Budget: The budget for the current year went down by two and one- 
half percent from the previous year. This means that in spite of 
larger numbers of students, higher prices for most goods and higher 
expectations on everyone's part, the resources decreased. We 
managed this increased demand and decreased resource dilemma by 
applying more efficiencies in some areas and reducing staff in 
others. We eliminated a guidance counselor so we could hire one 
elementary teacher for the increased enrollment. A half-time Food 
Service Director was eliminated at the end of the school year. A 
secretary was reduced from the Central Office. So, with a 
combination of efficiency and shifting of services, we are still 
progressing even though we have fewer resources. 

SCHOOL CHOICE: The Ipswich School Committee voted to participate 
in School Choice in January 1992. Forty-six students from other 
school districts are currently enrolled under the Choice program. 
Twenty-one Ipswich students chose to attend other public schools. 
The net result in financial terms is that the expected gross income 
generated by the forty-six incoming students for the period 
January 1992 through June 1993 is $247,158. The expected costs to 
Ipswich for the outplaced students is of $61,729. This results in 

-107- 



a net income to support Ipswich education of $185,429. 

Although this program produced a financial reward for the school 
system and the community, the main purpose for Ipswich 
participation in Choice was to initiate a school self-assessment 
leading to improved education for our Ipswich students. Based on 
this criteria, participation in the Choice program has been a 
large success because it stimulated the schools to be even more 
responsive to the perceived needs of parents and students. 

In terms of Choice impact on school enrollment, the net increase 
for students in Ipswich is 25 which averages two students per 
grade level or less than one-half student per classroom. We did 
not take Choice students in those grades where the enrollment was 
already high. Students were accepted in grades where our 
enrollment was low. The net result is that we balanced some of the 
extreme variation in student population to Ipswich's advantage. 

R.C. Whipple Middle School: The middle school has gone through a 
profound change in the last year and one-half. It has been well 
served by three different principals, Barry Hopping, Dick Kieran, 
and now Ron Toleos. Each principal brought certain changes to the 
school. Additionally, the parents, teachers and Superintendent have 
discussed, debated, planned and changed the school. The middle 
school made superb progress in academics, "student centered" 
approaches, and in client-centered attention. The physical changes 
at the middle school have contributed to the increased learning 
opportunities for our students. Those improvements include the new 
Science Lab for hands-on science, a new elevator and ramps for 
handicapped accessibility, and a new computer lab. 

Rapid changes, even if necessary, are scary, anxiety-provoking and 
threatening. Extensive changes call for great effort and 
commitment in order to produce exhilarating positives. If you are 
not aware or have not seen the great changes and amazing success 
that the parents, staff, and administration have achieved in this 
school, please visit or attend a school function. Congratulations 
and thanks to all involved in that effort. 

Academics: The school system continues to make rapid progress in 
curriculum development and instructional improvement that prepares 
students for the future. In the area of instruction, hands-on, 
activity oriented, real world problem solving continue to grow as 
instructional methods focus on higher levels of understanding and 
involvement on the part of the student. In the area of curriculum, 
Subject Area Committees (SACs) , which work in individual subject 
areas such as Math, Science, Social Studies and Critical Thinking, 
continue to change the "what" is taught and "how" we teach 
throughout the school system. The Critical Thinking Committee now 
has (in grade levels one through eight) four specific thinking 
skills which most educators consider extremely valuable for the 
future and that have never been taught in the past. 

-108- 






The Science SAC has improved the quality of materials used for 
teaching, and raised the expectations for real, in-depth 
understanding on the part of students as opposed to rote 
memorization of factual information which was more common in the 
past. The Math SAC Committee has almost 100% compliance at the 
elementary and middle school with new national mathematics 
standards and has 50% compliance at the high school. Social 
Studies, our newest SAC, is very active. It has received the 
national literature, developed it's own philosophy and a mission 
statement, and is now moving on to the development of a curriculum 
scope and sequence plan for that subject area. 

As you can see, your school system is aggressively moving to 
prepare today's students for tomorrow's world. We are very proud of 
our school system and invite you to come visit with us. 

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 
Elizabeth J. Geanakakis 

The Department of Special Services' Goals for the 1991-1992 school 
year focused on the following: 

o To develop an Ipswich Special Education Mission Statement. 
o To return to quality programs in Ipswich, if appropriate, 

those students now tuitioned out. 
o To implement site-based management of Special Education 

Services. 
o To improve supervisory methods so as to increase effective 

teaching performance. 
o To facilitate a plan which prepares the Department of Special 

Services for participation in a revised Massachusetts School 

Choice Program. 

The Mission of Ipswich Special Services is to provide students with 
identified special education needs, programs and services in the 
least restrictive environment in order to ensure that they become 
active and productive participants in their school and community. 

In addition, the Department of Special Services focused on the 
following for the 1992 calendar year: 

Instructional Change: 

o Teacher Assistant positions were expanded in order for them to 

work in the classroom, modifying curriculum and helping both 

SPED and regular students. 

Program Managers adjusted scheduling of their time in order to 

instruct and supervise Teacher Assistants along with assisting 

regular classroom teachers on modification and instructional 

techniques. 
o Through a Synthesis of Staff Survey , identified areas of 

training needed to make instructional change. 



-109- 



Client and Customer Satisfaction: 

o Planned a process by which parents had a full understanding of 

the Chapter 766 regulations and their rights involving 

evaluations. 
o SPED personnel helped and participated on an Inclusion Panel 

for Friends of the Winthrop School. 

Choice: 

o As of September, 1992, there were nine SPED choice students 
through the system and five tuitioned-in SPED students. 

o The reputation that has been built over the years for special 
education programming and quality of services provided has 
been developed through leadership and is one of the facets 
that make Ipswich a comprehensive quality school system. 

Shared Decision Making: 

o The final results of having only three SPED students in 
outside placements was completed in November, 1992. This took 
extensive planning, starting with developing the SPED 
Improvement Model Committee and setting agenda items to move 
the process along until we met the goal of returning students 
from outside placements. 

o Inclusion Planning has been implemented and effectively 
expanded to the elementary schools. 

o Transferred the SPED budget and SPED records from Central 
Office to schools (site-based) . 

o As a result of careful planning, all SPED classes that were 
previously "self contained" have been disbanded. Those 
students are "included" in regular classes with support in 
addition to educational instruction on their level. 

During 1991-92, the following occurred: 

Number of: 

New Referrals for Team Evaluation: 41 
Team Evaluations that resulted in new 

or continued placement: 36 

Team Evaluations that resulted in NO placement: 5 
Team Re-Evaluations of Individual Student Programs: 79 

Annual Review of Individual Student Programs: 2 03 

Screening of: 

3-Year Olds: 30 

4-Year Olds: 20 

Kindergarten: 14 6 

Number of Special Needs Students Serviced 

in 1991-1992: 317 

Number of Special Needs Students Completing 

Program Goals: 25 

Number of Special Needs Students Graduating: 7 



-110- 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Stephen M. Fortado, Principal 

I am pleased to submit my eighth annual report to the citizens of 
Ipswich. The 1991-1992 school year began with 388 students 
enrolled in grades nine through twelve. This was up from 373 for 
the previous year. One hundred nineteen freshmen replaced the 
eighty-seven seniors who graduated in June. 

This was the year that the school choice law went into effect and 
began to change the way schools view parents and students. Under 
school choice, students and parents who are not satisfied with 
their education have many more schooling options than ever before. 
It is not overly dramatic to observe that we have entered into a 
new era in public education. The notion of considering our 
students and parents as clients and customers is not new at Ipswich 
High School, as we have worked hard in recent years to encourage 
all Ipswich eighth graders to continue their education at the high 
school. The faculty prepared materials and a presentation for an 
open house for both in-coming eighth graders and students from 
outside of Ipswich. One of the unexpected benefits of the open 
house was the impact the presentation had on the other teachers. 
We became more aware how far we have come in integrating technology 
into instruction, raising academic and performance expectations, 
and providing a variety of teaching styles to accommodate our 
students' learning styles. 

Whether we like it or not, we are forced to look at ourselves from 
a quality and competitive perspective and do what should be done to 
satisfy our parents and students. Although one may criticize the 
funding penalties under the present school choice law, I cannot 
help but think that, in the long run, our students and parents 
should benefit from having more educational options. Schools, 
including Ipswich High School, must become more responsive to the 
needs of our students and parents in order to succeed. The 
responsiveness should generate increased emphasis on overall 
quality and higher standards that will help us fulfill our mission. 

Our students continue to achieve success in and out of the 
classroom. Our academic competitive teams in science, math and the 
college bowl continue to do well. The Advanced Placement 
examination results provided positive reinforcement for our 
academic program. The quality and competitiveness of our science 
fair participants continues to improve. A writing sample was 
administered to every student and the writing was assessed by a 
committee of teachers. The results, reports to students and 
parents, provided important feedback for the individual and the 
teachers regarding the overall quality of writing in the school. 
On the athletic front, we revived the golf team because of 
increased student interest, and they proceeded to win the Cape Ann 
League title and go on to the state tournament. The whole town 
rejoiced over our first football Super Bowl victory since 1977. 
Special congratulations to Coach Jack Welch, the coaching staff, 
and the Tigers football team. 

-Ill- 



An impressive eighty-one percent of our graduates went on to 
further education. Sixty four percent went on to four-year 
colleges. Those graduates had average SAT scores of 463 verbal and 
487 math. The percentage of graduates going to two-year colleges 
was 17%. We are pleased that our efforts to encourage all 
graduates to continue their education continue to show results. 

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the students, faculty, 
parents, and citizens of Ipswich for their continued support of 
quality education at Ipswich High School. 



PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D., Principal 

The calendar year 1992 was an outstanding year of growth of Doyon 
School. Our instructional program has never been stronger thanks 
in large part to the implementation of new programs under the Phase 
II curriculum initiative. 

In reading; , we continue to balance a whole-language literature- 
based approach with an exemplary skills/decoding program (called 
"Won Way") that is now taught in grades R - 3. We continue to try 
to challenge our students (and ourselves) with inferential 
questions that go beyond simple recall and comprehension. With all 
classrooms K - 2 now self-contained, we are able to do more 
integrating of reading and writing. In writing; we continue to use 
the writing process approach, encouraging our students to bring 
work to completion in "published" form. Last year, our Young 
Author's Week festival featured, for the first time, an evening for 
parents to peruse the work of all the children in the school. 
Several faculty members have recently formed a "portfolio support 
group," to determine if that approach will assist use in assessing 
student work in writing (and perhaps other subjects) . 

Our math program is continuing to evolve towards the 
recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 
We are weaving the University of Chicago School Mathematics program 
into our primary grades while replacing our upper-grade texts with 
the latest materials from Addison Wesley . Our School Store gave 
upper-graders experience in advertising, ordering, inventory work 
and retail sales in addition to an opportunity to use their math 
skills in a "real world" way. In science we are very excited about 
the impact that our ongoing emphasis on experimental learning is 
having on student awareness of scientific concepts. The new 
Science Curriculum Improvement Study (SCIS 3) materials have 
already made an impact. 

Enrollment is up again. We closed the 1991-1992 school year with 
409 students, and we opening the 1992-1993 school year with 443 
students. With reasonably small primary classes a top priority, we 
added an additional section of grade 2. As a result, we were 
forced to move the music program to the stage and the guidance 
office and the last of the teacher workrooms succumbed to the need 

-112- 



for more instructional space. 

Other highlights of 1992 include: 1) a bef ore-and-af ter Extended 
Day program, 2) advances in our computer and technology programs 
including a nine-week daily 30 minute program in grades 4 and 5 for 
teaching typing, word processing and familiarity with data base 
software, as well as CD-ROM based programs, more telecommunications 
activities, and more Macintosh computers in the classrooms, 3) 
outstanding scores on the Massachusetts Educational Assessment of 
performance (MEAP) tests, 4) more involvement and support from 
parents including many more parent volunteers in classrooms an*d 
the library, and ongoing support from the Friends of Doyon 
including an expanded After-School Activities Program, and a 
marvelous series of school assemblies and special programs, and 5) 
a highly successful program of "inclusion" enabling students with 
special needs to be increasingly mainstreamed into the regular 
education classroom. 

It continues to be a privilege and an honor to serve as your 
principal at the Doyon School. 



R.C. WHIPPLE MEMORIAL MIDDLE SCHOOL 
Ronald A. Toleos, Principal 

In 1992, the faculty of the Whipple Middle School decided that the 
name of the school should be as depicted above the columns at the 
entrance of the school. The school is named for its first 
principal, Ralph C. Whipple. While the faculty respects and honors 
tradition, it seeks a revised, rigorous, and new educational 
program. The objective here is reflected in our Mission Statement: 
I Our mission at the Ralph C. Whipple Memorial Middle School is to 
create and nurture a community where students are encouraged to 
develop confidence as lifelong learners with the awareness and 
flexibility necessary to adapt to a changing world." 

In meeting the needs of students facing a changing world we present 
the following: 

1. A brand new IBM Computer Lab where every child receives 
instruction on word processing, and all children are offered a 
chance to excel by operating sophisticated compact disk and laser 
technology. 

2. Our shop program is being transformed into robotics, 
pneumatics, physics and hydroponics labs using integrated math and 
science technologies. 

3. A Process-Based Science program for all grades which is at the 
pinnacle of educational research. Our students are learning in 
their new labs how to "do" science, as well as how to learn it. 

4. Teachers are motivating students to high levels of performance 
by using the new teaching tools which include: thinking skills 
(like synthesis and self-evaluation) , portfolio collections of 
student work, cooperative learning techniques which involve all 
students in every class, a reduction in the "Lecture" model and an 

-113- 



increase in the "Student as Worker" model. A research paper has 
been instituted in the 8th grade English program, a summer reading 
requirement is followed up in the fall with student reports; a 
University of Chicago Math text, along with excellent instruction, 
has lead to extremely high student performance on the state tests. 
5. A new Advisor/Advisee Program links each student with a caring 
faculty member. Weekly meetings provide students with a forum to 
discuss goals and strategies to help everyone have a successful 
experience at school by being part of a problem-solving team. 

Themes have been a part of this year. The Respect Theme was 
supported by teachers and students developing rules of conduct in 
each class together. Assembly programs on respect were held during 
Martin Luther King Day and by the IPSPAC parents, "I'm Special, 
You're Special." Respect for laws and ethics have been supported by 
consistent and fair disciplinary practices which feature mediation 
and natural consequences. 

We have been listening to parents who are on most committees with 
teachers and students. They are helping the school grow to better 
meet the needs of children. Parents are our partners in the 
classrooms and faculty rooms, volunteering and working along with 
our dedicated staff. 

In addition to the many quality programs already in existence, it 
has been a year of progress for teachers, with many attending 
conferences, updating their skills, and learning new methods for 
motivating students. 

The climate of the R. C. Whipple Middle School is one filled with 
positive energy where all members of our school community are 
working together. 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

Carolyn Davis, Principal 

The Winthrop School student enrollment continues to increase 
necessitating expansion of programs, additional staff and more 
parent participation. The school presently houses over 470 
students with 80 staff members. A student-centered approach, 
challenging programs and a caring environment are special features 
of the Winthrop School. There continues to be a strong commitment 
to provide quality programs for each child in a positive and 
motivating climate. 

We are proud of and grateful for the resounding parent support at 
the Winthrop School. Our Volunteers in School program which 
received awards from the National School Public Relations 
Association has reached the highest number this year with over 125 
volunteers. This program is of great benefit to the faculty and 
the students. Our parent organization, the Friends of Winthrop, 
has made major contributions to the school this year. This group 
has sponsored several fundraisers which significantly increased 

-114- 






financial support for the school in the areas of playground 
improvements, cultural and enrichment programs, after school 
programs and instructional resources for teachers. The Winthrop 
Parent forum continues to be a problem-solving vehicle for parents. 

Teachers have taken advantage of several professional development 
opportunities that have assisted in developing teaching strategies 
to prepare students for the 21st century. Our computer technology 
program continues to expand so that our computers are localized in 
a computer lab and available for individual classroom use. 
Computer technology is integrated across all subjects. Other areas 
of professional development have concentrated on current math 
standards, hands-on science strategies, and higher order thinking 
skills. Our curriculum emphasizes and interdisciplinary approach 
to subject areas as well as relevant connections to the real world. 

The faculty at the Winthrop School is making a strong commitment to 
quality education. It is through the combined efforts and 
dedication of staff members and the generous contributions of 
Ipswich parents and citizens that make Winthrop such an exceptional 
school. 

******** 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
REVENUE SHARING HANDICAPPED REGULATIONS 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section 
51.55 of the Revenue Sharing Regulations, as published in the 
Federal Register on October 17, 1983. Section 51.55 prohibits 
discrimination against qualified individuals because of their 
handicapped status. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advised the public, employees, 
and job applicants that it does not discriminate on the basis of 
handicapped status in admission or access to, or treatment, or 
employment in its programs and activities. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or office) 
as the contact to coordinate efforts to comply with this 
requirement. Inquiries should be directed to: 






Name: 

Office: 

Address: 

Phone Number 
Hours: 



George E. Howe 

Town Manager 

Town Hall, South Main Street 

Ipswich, MA 01938 

(508) 356-4848 

8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Mondays 

8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Tues. - Thurs 

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Fridays 



_1 1 c. 



TRUSTEES OF THE IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STATEMENT OF FUND ACTIVITY 

July 1, 1991 to June 30, 1992 

I. BOOK FUND AND MEMORIAL FUNDS 

Balance - July 1, 1991 

Contributions : 

Interest Income: 

Transfer from Library Trust Fund 

Expenditures : 

Books 

CD. System 

Architectural work - Handicap Access 

Ramp for Handicap Access 

Firewall Installation 

Supplies 

Balance -June 30, 1992 



$14,765.79 

7,611.00 

843.00 

7,000.00 

(5,412.00) 
(2,657.00) 
(6,441.00) 
(1,633.00) 
( 329.00) 
( 7.00) 

$13,740.79 



II. IPSWICH SPEAKS FUND 

Balance - July 1, 1991 

Interest Income: 
Balance - June 30, 1992 



$ 1,263.00 

75.78 

$ 1,338.78 



III. LIBRARY TRUST FUND 



Balance July 1, 1991 

Interest Income 
Expenditures: 

Transfer to Book Fund and 

Memorial Funds 



$47,567.52 
2,570.94 

(7,000.00) 



Balance - June 30, 1992 

Augustine Hear Fund 
Elizabeth R. Lathrop Fund 
Adelade B. Lockhart Fund 
Abby L. Newman Fund 
George Spiller Fund 
Daniel Treadwell Fund 



$10,394.31 

1,522.50 

757.90 

3,566.45 

1,285.20 

25,612.10 



$43.138.46 



-116- 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Balance, July 1, 1991 $ 43,491.43 

Cash Received 349,222.72 

Expenditures 379,554.68 

Balance, June 30, 1992 13,159.47 

Little Neck, Land Valuation $18,371,700.00 

Buildings - Community Center & Barn 75,600.00 

Cash in First National Bank of Ipswich 13,159.47 

On Deposit - Ipswich Cooperative Bank 2,000.00 

On Deposit - First National Bank of Ipswich 25 . 561. 92 

$18,488,021.39 

SCHEDULE I 

CASH RECEIPTS 
July 1, 1991 - June 30, 1992 

Building & Land Taxes $ 279,301.16 

Rents 69,921.56 

$ 349,222.72 

SCHEDULE A 

RECONCILIATION OF CASH RECEIPTS 

Balance, July 1, 1991 - $ 43,491.43 

Cash Receipts - Schedule I 349,222 .72 

1392,714.15 
xpenditure - Schedule II 379 . 554 . 68 

$ 13,159.47 



-117- 



SCHEDULE II 
EXPENDITURES 
July 1, 1991 - June 30, 1992 
Taxes 

Town of Ipswich 
Repairs & Upkeep 

Wharf & Dock 

Playgrounds 

Tree & Brush Work 

Road Paving & Repair 

Shingle Community Center 

Maintenance 
Salaries & Expenses 

Salaries 

Transportation 

Police 

Office Supplies 

Meetings 

Telephone 

Insurance 

Aluminum Dock Ramp 

Transfer to Savings - School Account 



$ 279,301.16 

4,295.71 
1,200.00 
7,804.00 
29,419.00 
8,015.59 
2,273.90 

4,000.00 

500.00 

5,128.64 

960.47 

225.41 

110.05 

8,764.00 

2,556.75 

25,000.00 

$379,554.68 






-118- 






BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

Balance on hand January 1, 1992 $33,608.30 

Income from funds for year 1992 as follows: 

Interest: Ipswich Co-Operative Bank 

Money Market Certificate $ 1,993.69 

Balance on hand January 1, 1993 as follows: 

Ipswich Co-Operative Bank 

Money Market Certificate $35, 601.99 

V. James DiFazio 
Treasurer 



-119- 



BUDGET VS ACTUAL REVENUE 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1992 





FY92 


FY92 


FY92 


FY92 


ACCOUNT 


BUDGET 


ACTUAL 


DIFFERENCE 


% COLLECTED 


PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES- 1992 




$119,643 






-1991 




$3,558 






-1990 




$264 






-1989 




$0 






-1988 




$833 






-1987 




$0 






-1986 




$0 






-1985 




$0 






TOTAL PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 


$148,858 


$124,298 


($24,560) 


83.50% 


REAL ESTATE TAXES - 1 992 




$10,281,464 






-1991 




$66,105 






-1990 




$546 






-1989 




$0 






-1988 




$0 






-1987 




$101 






-1986 




$0 






-1985 




$0 






TOTAL REAL ESTATE TAXES 


$10,916,609 


$10,348,216 


($568,393) 


94.79% 


TOTAL PERSONAL & RE TAXES 


$1 1 ,065,467 


$10,472,514 


($592,953) 


94.64% 


MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE- 1992 




$415,031 






-1991 




$210,796 






-1990 




$32,813 






-1989 




$534 






-1988 




$234 






-1987 




$229 






-1986 




$74 






-1985 




$863 






TOTAL MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 


$626,240 


$660,574 


$34,334 


105.48% 


BOAT EXCISE TAXES 


$26,500 


$24,886 


($1,614) 


93.91 % 


PENALTIES & INTEREST ON TAXES 










INTEREST ON TAXES 




$98,951 






DEMANDS 




$15,593 






TOTAL PEN & INT ON TAXES 


$97,000 


$114,544 


$17,544 


118.09% 


PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES 


$46,900 


$46,247 


($653) 


98.61 % 


DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 










TOWN PROPERTY 




$1,776 






LIEN CERTIFICATES 




$14,675 






MISCELLANEOUS 




$16,773 






SALE OF INVENTORY 




$0 






TOTAL DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 


$50,400 


$33,224 


($17,176) 


65.92% 


FEES 


$71,100 


$46,010 


($25,090) 


64.71 % 


DEPARTMENTAL- CEMETARY 


$35,600 


$36,634 


$1,034 


102.90% 


DEPARTMENTAL- RECREATION 


$17,800 


$17,495 


($305) 


98.29% 


RENTALS 


$13,000 


$13,552 


$552 


104.25% 



-120- 



BUDGET VS ACTUAL REVENUE 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1992 



ACCOUNT 

LICENSES & PERMITS 
GENERAL 
DISPOSAL 
HEALTH 

STREET OPENINGS 
BLDG INSPECTOR 
FIRE/BURNING 
PISTOL/FID 
MOORING 
MISCELLANEOUS 
TOTAL LICENSES & PERMITS 

INTEREST ON INVESTMENTS 

FINES & FORFEITS 
COURT 
PARKING 
LIBRARY 
TOTAL FINES & FORFEITS 

REFUNDS 
GENERAL 
TOTAL REFUNDS 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 
WATER BETTERMENT 
SEWER BETTERMENT 
STREET BETTERMENT 
STREET COMM INTEREST 
TOTAL SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 

SEWER REVENUE 
USER CHARGES 
SEWER LIENS ADDED TO TAX 
TOTAL SEWER REVENUE 

WATER REVENUE 
USER CHARGES 
WATER ADDED TO TAX 
TOTAL WATER REVEUNUE 

TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

ELD PAYMENT IN LIEU OF TAXES 

TAX TITLE PAYMENTS 

CHERRY SHEET REIMBURSEMENTS 

TOTAL 



FY92 
BUDGET 



$204,700 
$1 28.500 



FY92 
ACTUAL 



$116,938 
$3,590 
$5,425 
$1,160 

$36,743 
$6,809 
$2,816 

$30,350 
$6,472 



$210,303 
$102,284 



$48,494 

$12,520 

$3,982 



$92,500 


$64,996 




$245,580 
$245,580 


$13,900 


$250 
$19,823 

$537 

$7,654 

$28,264 


$394,000 

$43,560 

$437,560 


$429,092 

$48,283 

$477,375 


$935,000 

$120,700 

$1,055,700 


$965,695 

$142,716 

$1,108,411 


$2,917,400 


$3,230,379 


$575,000 


$570,190 


$0 


$389,503 


$2,510,016 


$2,487,437 


$17,067,883 


$17,150,023 



FY92 
DIFFERENCE 



$5,603 
($26,216) 



($27,504) 



$245,580 



$14,364 
$39,815 

$52,71 1 

$312,979 

($4,810) 

$389,503 

($22,579) 

$82,140 



FY92 
% COLLECTED 



102.74% 
79.60% 



70.27% 



203.34% 

109.10% 

104.99% 
110.73% 

99.16% 
100.00% 

99.10% 
100.48% 



■121- 



TOM IF IPS-IOt C1POCC IHSER 

expose _E_e_p report 

FISCAL vim \m 

JUC X. 1992 

RIC OK KWML FIM 



annua 

— type 01: salaries, unfits. ETX Subtotal.... 
TYPE 02: EXPENSE Sibtotal 

-«rncnoa ooj: sEuniot subtoui 

type 01: salaries, wets, etc subtotal.... 
— type 02: expeme juKotai 

TYPE 03: OUTUU S_>total 

TYPE 03: __OULTA«73 Subtotal 

OEPABTien 009: TM nMMGEX Subtotal 

— TYPE 01 L SALARIES. HAGES. ETC Subtotal — 
rtpt 02: expexse Subtotal 

-xpufinen 009; icoeratqr Subtoui. ......... 

TYPE 01: SALARIES, HAGES. ETC Subtotal.... 
_-PEJ__. tlPENStS-Jtotal... 

DEPMrmEXT on: fwnce cmuiTEE Subtotal.. 

TYPE 06: DESERVE Subtotal 

- DEPflOTtXL 013L RESERVE FIND Subtotal 

TYPE Oil SALARIES. HASES. ETC Subtotal.... 

— IYPE_a_UEIPE>GE-S-)tota___- _.._._. ....... 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal 

-uEPARDBrt-Oll: ELEC I REE Subtottl 

TYPE OK SALARIES! WES. ETC Subtotal.... 

TYPE ft?: EXPET-E- Subtotal. .... 

TYPE 031 OUTLAY Subtotal 

-JXPARTTEKI 025: AmLKTlNE Subtotal 

'"•■ TYPE 01: SALARIES. NAGES, ETC Subtotal 

TYPE. OS-EXPENSE- Subtotal 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY subtotal 

TYPE 03: COKSULTAJTrS Subtotal 

DEPARTREKT 02?: ASSESSOR Subtotal 

TYPE- OILSALASIES. W6ES- ETC Subtotal 

TYPE 02: EIPEKSE Subtotal 



.0.00 17. 193.00- 

0.00 6.300.00 



0.00 
0.00 



3.716.22 
73.00 



0.00- 
0.00 



0.00 

0.00 



0.00- 

0.00 



-0.0O- 



-24.536. 6*- 



o.oo ai. 840.00 

.0.00 14. in. oo- 

0.00 0.00 

0.00 3.000.00 



0.00 

0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



7.393.00 

— 720.73- 

0.00 



0.00 
.0.00- 
0.00 
0.00 



0.00 

1ZB.00 
0.00 

0.00 



0.00 
.0.00_ 

o.oo 

0.00 



9V. 233. 00 
14.971. JT_ 

0.00 
9.282.19 



0.00 

. 6J.76_ 

0.00 

0.00 



0.00 



101.033.00 



.0.00- 
0.00 



128.00 
__0.00_ 



0.00 
-0.00_ 



113.489.11 



69.76 



0.00 
.0.00- 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



2.000.00 
_ 210. 20_ 



0.00 

_0.00_ 



11.264.00 

_6_no.oo_ 



0.00 

-0.oa_ 



28.00 
_0.00_ 



0.00 
_fl.00_ 



940.00 
0.00_ 



0.00 
-103. 00_ 



10,436.30 

-i6_?.3B. 



1.793.30 
-J_i33.1-_ 




0.00 
-0.00- 



101.196.00 
—11. 360.00- 



0.00 
-0.00- 



3.690.48 
30.00- 



0.00 
-0.00_ 



0.00 
.0.00-. 



0.00 
_1_W7.00_ 



104,837.23 
B-769.63- 



29.23 
_1.143.33_ 



116.036.00 
_104.l_2.00_ 



_0.00_ 
0.00 



3.740.48 
_4.339.00_ 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



1,172.60 
_2.27B_.1_ 



DESCRJPTK* 

IYPE-03: -OUTLAY Subtotal 

OEPARTHEXT 033: TREAS/COLL Subtotal 

TYPE 01: SALARIES. WEES. ETC Subtotal 

type 02: £_■___ smtotal 

ITPE-03 .-OUTLAY -Sl-total 

department 033: pikhas'-TBDBT Subtotal 

type 01: salaries. w6_5. etc subtotal 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal 

DEPARTMENT 039: TOW CLEFS Subtotal 

WPE-0i:-__»IES, -Hf_£S_-ETC-S<i>toUl 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Sibtotal 

TYPE 06: LITI6ATI0N subtotal 

DEPARTMENT 043: LEEM. Subtotal 

JYPE-OIL-SALWIES, -HAGES. -ETC -Subtotal _ 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal 

.jepartioi-o_i: app__s -Board Subtotal 

TYPE 01: SALARIES. HAGES, ETC Subtotal 

21- EXPENSE Subtotal „ 

TYPE 03: CaGULTAKTS Subtotal 

-DEPARTT_NT-06J:-P-A»lII_ SOARS Subtotal 

TYPE 01: SALARIES. MAGES. ETC Subtotal 

TYPE-02: -EXPENSE -Subtotal... 

DEPARTMENT 064: MASTER PLAN COtllSSI Subtotal 

TYPE OK SALARIES. HA6ES. ETC S-itotal 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal 

-YT.-03; OJTU1T Subtotal 

TYPE 04: EXIST SUPPLIES Subtotal 

-DEPARTMENT 063: -TO* HULL Subtotal 

TYPE 01: SALARIES. DAKS. ETC Subtotal 

DEPARTMENT 071: IIISC FIN-BE>CFITS -litotal... 



WPRCPR1ATN 
0.00- 



T0MN OF IT-MICH EIFENSE LEDGES 

EXPENSE LEDGER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1992 

JU€ 30, 1992 

FU* 01:-_EN3ML FU» 



APPRDPRIATN 
0.00- 



TRANSFERS 
0.00- 



REEEIPTS 
0.00- 



REJfEU-E 

0.00- 



EX3NRAK- 

0.00- 



PAYMEXTS 
0.00- 






0.00 
0.00 
-O.OO- 



24,770.00 
6.3T3.00 

_4.3OT.0-- 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 



746.00 

23.00 

0.00- 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 

o.oo 

-0.00- 



23.312.68 

6.389.61 

—4.414.44 - 



3.32 
230.39 
__B3.J-- 



48.734.23 

3.130.68 



273.77 
603.29 



-12.960.00- 

2.390.00 



-1.340.00- 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



-14.300.00- 

1,364.23 
41.631.82 



993.73 
0.00 



£0 



riO 



0.00 

_1.300.00_ 

0.00 



862.14 
__5_.08_ 



0.00 
-0.00- 



1. 000.00 
700.00- 



0.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 
-O.00- 



0.00 
J.00. 



960.00 
0.00- 



40.00 
-700.00- 



i 

lib 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 



21.943.00 

10.376.00 

344.00- 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00. 



638.00 
3.010.00 
_J.699.00_ 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 
0.00 
_0.00_ 



0.00 
3.010.00 
0.00- 



21.943.94 

9.604. 10 

-10.238. 97_ 



639.06 
971.90 
4.03_ 



0.00 


17.817.00 


0.00 


0.00 


o.oo 


0.00 


0.00 


16.183.73 


1.631.27 
















37.977.74 


3.246.26 


0.00 


730.324.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1.678.87 


6.367.36 


646.733.76 


78.701.33 



TOM IF IPSN1CH EIPENSE LEDGER 

EXPENSE LEDGER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1992 

JIK 30, 1972 

FUND 01: general RM 



DESCRIPTION 
_- TYPE 02: EIPENSE Subtotil 

department osi: msc fin-insurance subtotil. 

TYPE 01: SALARIES, «AGES. ETC S_totll.... 
TYPE 02: EIPENSE Siiltotil 

DEPARTHENT 091: RISC FINANCE Subtotal 

TYPE 01: SALARIES. I«6_l. ETC Smtotil. 

TYPE 02: EXPEK3E S_totll 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotil 

TYPE- 04:- ENERGY SUPPLIES Subtotil 

TYPE 09: BISC Subtotil 

-DEPARTMENT- 1011- POLICE S_totll 

TYPE 01: SALARIES, NAGES. ETC S_total. 

TYP£-02; EIPENSE Subtotil 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotil 

TYPE 04: ENERGY SUPPLIES Subtotil 

DEPARTMENT 102: P0I1CE-HARBCRS Subtotil.. 

TYPE-Ol:- SALARIES. HA6ES. ETC-Subtotil. 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotil 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Siiltotll 

TYPE -MUOtXI SUPPLIES- Subtotil 

TYPE 09: RISC Subtotil 

- DEPARTMENT. 103: FIRE Subtotil 

TYPE 01: SALARIES, NAGES. ETC Subtotil. 

TYPE- 02:- EXPENSE Subtotil 

TYPE 04: ENERGY SUPPLIES Subtotil 

-DEPARTMENT- I1_L SHELLFISH Subtotil 

TYPE 01: SALARIES, ___. ETC Subtotil. 

— nrPE-02:-EiPENse subtotil ..... 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotil 

TYPE 04: ENERGY SUPPLIES Subtotil 

DEPARTMENT 113: BLDE INSPECTOR Subtotil.. 

TYPt 01:. SALARIES. NAGES. ETC- Subtotil. 

TYPE 02: EIPDSE Subtotal 



CARRIED 
FTJRNARD 



APPROPRIATN APPROPRIATN TRANSFERS 
_ 276.949.00 0.00 0.00 — 



112,706.00 
72.63B. 00 



-CURRENT- 
RECEIPTS 



REIMBURSE 
0.00- 



0.00 
_0.00_ 
0.00 
0.00 



183.344.00 

-969.843.00- 

167.634.00 

32.146.00 

_ 38.205.00- 

1,000.00 

,208.848. 00_ 

6.930.00 

_4.903.0Q_ 

0.00 

930.00 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



109.292.19- 

-29.389.00— 
23.00 

0.00 
0.00— 

0.00 



0.00 

. 123.11- 

0.00 

0.00 



ENCUMBRANCE 
4,000.00- 



7,267.26 



PAYMENTS BALANCE 
- 242,058.06 30.890.94_ 



36.570.16 



-0.00- 
0.00 
0.00 

-0.00- 
0.00 



-0.00 . O.OO 986.348.09- 

0.00 26.30 167,348.39 

0.00 0.00 32.117.16 

_0.0Q 3,304.44 26.796. 3B_ 

0.00 0.00. 1,000.00 



-DJM- 

0.00 
_0.O0_ 
O.OO 
0.00 



-3, 330.96 1.213.810.02- 



12.964.37 

-tl.063.9l_ 
104.11 
28.84 
-8.104. 16- 

o.oo 

_19.321.02_ 



0.00 
-0.00_ 



4.767.64 
_4.BB3.24_ 
0.00 
389.33 



2.162.36 

146. 93_ 

0.00 
360.47 



12.783.00 



123.17 



10.040.41 



2,869.76 




TOM OF IPSNICH EXPENSE LEDGER 

EIPENSE LEDGER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1992 

JUNE 30. 1992 

FUND OU-GDBML FIKO 



DESCRIPTION 

IYT_-04:-ENER6Y -SUPPLIES Subtotil 

KPARTMEXT 131: EMERGENCY MBIT Subtotil.. 

TYPE 01: SALARIES, HAGES. ETC Subtotil. 

TYPE 02: EIPENSE Subtotil 

nr_-03:-TJUT_IY-S_totil 

- TYre 04: __wy _mi_ subtotil 

_uEPARTHQ(T-l„:-ANII»_-C_nTfflL-S_totil.. 
TYPE 01: SALARIES. NAGES. ETC Subtotal. 

DEPARTHENT 200: EDXATION SAL Subtotil... 
WPE-02: _-_6E-5_totil. ...... ....... 

DEPARTHENT 202: EDXATION EIP Subtotil... 

TYPE 01: SALARIES, NAGES, ETC Subtotal. 
TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotil , 

DEPARTHENT 301: PUB MS ADMIN S_totlI... 

IYPE-Ol:-SALARIES. -NAGES. -ETC -Subtotil 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotil 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtttil 

IYPE-07:--r__ -TREATMENT -Siiltotll 

DEPARTMENT 303: HIGHNAV Subtotil 

TYPE 01: SALARIES, NAGES. ETC Subtotil 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotil 

TYPE-04: -ENERGY- SUPPLIES Subtotal 

TYPE 09: RISC Subtotil 

-DEPARTMENT -303: SN0- I ICE Subtotil 

TYPE 01: SALARIES. NAGES. ETC Subtotil 
TYPE -02: -EXPENSE Subtotil 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotil 

TYPE 04: ENERGY SUPPLIES Subtotal 

DEPARTHENT 309: EQUIP HAINT Subtotil.... 

TYPE 02: EIPENSE Subtotil 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal 

-DEPART NEXT 403: SANITATION Subtotil 



-CARRIED 
FTJRNARD 



— ORIGINAL— 
APPROPRIATN 



STH_SUPP— 

APPROPRIATN 



TRANSFERS 
0.00- 



-C_tR_fT_- 
REEEIPTS 



REIHBURSE 
— .00- 



ENCU-RANCE 

o.oo- 



PAYMENTS 
0.00 



BRLANZ 
75.00- 



200.00 



0.00 



64.32 



0.00 
0.00 



23.724.00 
3.182.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



788.00 
0.00 

-0.00- 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 
-O.O0- 
0.00 



O.OO 
0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



0.00 
616.00 
-0.00- 

0.00 



24.438.00 

4,326.89 

0.00- 



34.00 
39.11 

O.OO- 

179.90 



6.924.227.00 
-1.833.773.00- 



0.00 
-0.00- 



100.922.19- 
-100.922. 19— 



O.OO 
-212.70- 



28.695.72 
_46.21_.77_ 



6.778,469.70 
_1J17.812._U 



16.179.39 
_7.117.K__ 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



63,322.37 
2.268.91 



0.00 
223.09 




0.00 
0.00 
-O.00- 
0.00 



0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 
0.00 



-0.00- 
0.00 



576.777.00 

23.000.00 
67,330.00 

3.600.00- 

27,000.00 

__5.150.00. 

31.328.00 

—33.840.00- 

0.00 

13.840.00 

83.008.00 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 
0.00 



0.00 

0.00 

0.00- 

o.oo 

0.00- 

938.00 

0.00- 

0.00 
0.00 

938. 00 



0.00 
O.OO 
_0.00- 
0.00 



0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 
0.00 



-0.00- 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



0.00 
-O.OO- 
0.00 
0.00 



-0.00- 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 
O.OO 



0.00 
_0.00_ 
0.00 
0.00 



1.390.94- 
0.00 



338.999.03 

22.350.43 
36.416.56 

3.926.23- 

9.260.00 

_Jli 933.24 _ 

31.766.20 
_32. 121.72- 
0.00 
13.232.08 

79.140.00 

330.318.34- 
0.00 



37.608.43 

2.649.37 
11.133.41 

-1.673.73 

17.740.00 

-33.196.76 

499.80 

—3.718.28 

0.00 
387.92 

4.806.00 

-46. 094.32 

0.00 

,46.094.32 



"II. 



tun if irsaicx ciroa wax 

EXPENSE LEBER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1772 

ut 30. \m 
ran 01: bom. fue — 



f 



armrfta mi: hisickical am s>oiatii — 



TYPE 01 

type in: 
type to: 



SALARIES. IH6ES. ETC Svbtota 

Eu__E sn-ioul 

OUTLAT 5_tolal 



0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



upwmon w: _ks_rv can subtotal.. 



Trrc 01: SALARIES. WOES. ETC Subtotal. 
m 0?: EH-OE Subtotal. 
TYPE 07: nlSC Subtotal.... 



0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



3l.t7S.00 
.12.302.00. 

1.000.00 



0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



1.180.74- 

23.00— 

0.00 



0.00 
_0.00_ 
0.00 



0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



30.317.04 

_7.«2I.42- 

•43.00 



-srmnoa- son- health suitotai. 
type 02: timet subtotal 



















1.800.00 
1,173.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
n on 


0.00 
O 00 


0.00 


1. 000. 00 


0.00 


1. 000. 00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.0* 


0.00 


1.000.00 



o 



OBWTfEKT 302: HEALTH CONTRACTS Subtotal... 



-TYPE Oil- SALARIES. MAGES. ETE-SUltotal....- 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



_7B7.0O_ 

0.00 
0.00 



-0.oo_ 
o.oo 
o.oo 



OEPARTltKT 310: S/M TRANSFER Subtotal. 



-TYPEOH-SALARIQ. HAGES. ETC- Subtotal., 



TYPE 02; EIPEKSE Subtotal 

_ OEPMtTren- ni: auciue&im subtotal. 

TYPE 02: EXPOSE Subtotal 



_0.00_ 
0.00 



DEW_HTfXT 331: VETERAK5' SERV Subtotal. 



-TYPE 011- 
TYPE 02: 
TYPE 03: 



SALARIES. HAGES. ETC- Subtotal 

EXPE1SE Subtotal 

OUTLAY Subtotal 

BEEt SUPPLIES. Subtotal 



OEPAHrPEKT 371: COCTERY/PARJS Subtotal. 



.0.00_ 
O.OO 
0.00 

-O.OO- 



24.834.00 

3.900.00 
-10.3ZJ.00_ 



_0.00_ 
0.00 
0.00 

_0.00_ 



0.00 

_ 6. I62.00_ 

23.00 

0.00 

_0.00_ 



0.00 
0.00 
_0.00_ 



_0.00_ 
0.00 
0.00 

_0_KL_ 



0.00 
0.00 
_0.00_ 



23.374.10 

3,724.00 

_8_0U.__. 



1.484.70 

76.00 

_2.3U.63_ 



6.187.00 



O.OO 



TYPE 01: 
TYPE 02: 
_TYPE-03_- 



SAUKIES. HAGES. ETC Subtotal. 
EIPEKSE Subtotal , 

outlay subtotal.. 

ENEJ5. su=al_3 Subtotal. 



-DENiTn-NLMU-Uewnt Subtotal.. 



IBB. 788. 00 
73.621.00 
-1.373. 00_ 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



2,780.00 

73.00 

0.00_ 



0.00 
0.00 
-.O.OO-. 



0.00 
277.07 
0_M_ 



O.OO 
113.84 
J_J_-_30_ 
0.00 



171.472.06 

72.732.12 

. 270. O0_ 



73.74 
747.13 
_130-00__ 



Jb2fl8.8i___2A4_l7_.B3_ 



13 



TOM OF IPSNICH EIPEN5E UED6ER 

EXPENSE LEDGER REPORT 

FISCAL TEAR 1772 

JUE 30. 1772 

— FUW 01: -__3ML-F_e 



DESCRIPTION 

—TYPE -01: -SALARIES. MA6ES. ETC Subtotal 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE SUitotal 

TYPE 04: QEREY SUPPLIES Subtotal 

K-ffiTIENT 621: REOIEATION Subtotal 

TTT_-02:-__-JOE-3UltotJl , 

DEPwrnerr 701: PAYion of hot sutotai 

TYPE 06: RESERVE SUitotal 

-^_P|«TIB(T-77B:-fM.XRTJ_)Qin-Sl_tot_ 

TYPE 02: EXT_6E 5-total 

— _nHB-_BMlMa.il 

DEPMtnENT 777: MSCELLANECUS Subtotal.. 
F1KD 01: -6E1CRAL -FUND -SUitotal 




TO* OF IPSNICH EXPENSE LEDGER 

EXPENSE LEDGER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1772 

JUC 30. 1772 

- FUND 20: SPECIAL RtVENE FUO- 



KSCRIPTION 
-TYPE 01: SALARIES. "AGES. ETC Subtotal..... 



PAYIOnS 
_- ao.I3t.M_ 



BtLtta 

2.681. 62_ 



K-ARTHEXT 101: POLICE SUitotal. 



TYPE 01: SALARIES, MAGES. ETC SUitotal. 

-CE-AfiTKENt. 103: FIRE Subtotal 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE SUitotal 



0.00_ 

8,737.18 



-0.00_ 

o.oo 



-0.00- 
0.00 



_o.oo_ 

0.00 



if- 



OEPflRDENT 870: RVFO-ATHLETICS SUitotal.. 
TYPE- 0__ EXPENSE SUitotal , 



8.737.18 
_ 3,677.86- 



0.00 

-0.00- 



37.362.74 
_12.824.64_ 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



64,003.43 

- 13, ___.< 



4.316.67 
--86_ja_ 



-l ' DEPARTMENT 871: RVFIH_CH_TIi_ Subtotal.. 



TYPE 02: EXPENSE SUitotal 

874:. RVFlbSOL USER. Subtotal.. 
TYPE 02: EXPENSE SUitotal 



_2. 303.64_ 
4,044.03 



_0.00_ 
0.00 



_0__. 

"o.oo 



-3.003. 00_ 
3.330.00 



-0_«_ 
0.00 



DEPfKTnENT 875: RVFJ-A0U.T ED SUitotal.., 
IYP_02_ EXPENSE Subtotal 

_.»T__T 876: RVF.-SCH TUITN Subtotal.. 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal 

_IEP«RTIB<_B77:_RVF_-l_St BOOL SUitotal.. 



7,304.18 


0.00 


..0.00 


0.00 


11,308.00 


0.00 . 


0.00 


11.427.33 


7,182.83 


1.807.72 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


322.80 


O.OO 


O.OO 


1.734.10 


376.42 



■5 



DEPARTNENT 878: RVFUNStlOI Subtotal... 

__niP£_02i_EiPENSE. subtotal 

departoit tn; rvfu-polins iox subtotal 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal 

_I)EPARII4PuE^l^RVFWAS_UtSP_ Subtotal.. 
TYPE 09: MX Subtotal 

oepartcxt era bwhwiiw. subtotal 




TOM (F IPSMICM E1PB6E LEDGER 

EXPENSE LEDGER REPORT 

FISCAL YEW 1992 

JUNE 30. 1992 

-FUND ra-SPEUM. -REVENUE -FUND - 



TOW OF 1FSN1CH EXPENSE LEDSER 

EXPENSE LEDSER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1992 

I f JO, J992 JFUtU 

FUW 21: REVENUE BHNUNS FUND 



ps 




KCOUIT MMBt DE8OIIPTI0N 

B670-21-033-0000 TREAS/COLL 

___JTO JHIJUSC .Subtotal.... „..~.a_~^, 
DEPARTTCNT 033: TREKVCOLL Subtotal 

JOJ^tSJlJlOJLJUSmiiVtlJUSjREVENUE^aiBajNj. 

• J type 09: nisc subtotal 

^__D£Bl«TltM_a!LJIISCELL/»eDUSJUbti)tAU. J ^^. 
FUND 21: REVENUE SHARING FUND Subtotal , 



"I 



0.00 
J&Y302,08_. 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
JOtJW.OO 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
_0J9_ 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
jM0_ 



0.00 
J,_pp_ 



0.00 
1.912.O0- 



. 5 ;0.00 '■ 
o.o o 



0.00 1.112.00- 

0.00 idlest. 

0.00 1.112.00- 



1M OF IPSNICH EXPENSE LEDGER 

EXPENSE LEDGER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR I W2 

JUNE 30. 1992 (FINRLl 

FUND 22: SCHDOL LUNCH FUND 



ACCaKT MISER DESCRIPTION 

0412-22-2*1-3100 FOOD SERVICE .PERSONAL SEW • 

type o i: salaries. Mb ETC suttoti] 

O6B8-22-24I-32O0 FOOD SERVICE .FURCH OF SERV . 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal 

DEPARTNENT 241: FODD SERVICE Subtotal 

rim??: srmn i im iw subtotal 



4,333.2? 
4,333.29 
<, 355,2? 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



321.8S3.33 
321.883.33 
321,883.35 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



320,033.56 
320,033.36 
320.033.56 



6,207.09 
6.207.08 
t.M7-0» 



TOM OF 1PSM1CH EXPENSE LEDGER 

EXPENSE LEDGER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1992 

ME 30, 1992 

- FIN) 24: OTHER SPEC REVENUE FUKOS 




DEPARTNENT 101: PaiCE Subtotal 



0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,328.61 


6.861.00 


0.00 


0.00 


2.969.94 


7.219.74 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


o.oo 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 



, pj TYPE 01: SALARIES, HASES. ETC Subtotal 




DEPlWrrEOT 102; POLICE-HASKKS Subtotal.. 
TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal ., 



DEPARTNENT 409: SEND) Subtotal. 



0.00 - 3,000.00 



DEPAKTIEXT 619; -SRNMVAN-8B. Subtotal.. 



DEPARTNENT 821: SRNI-POLICE Subtotal 



0.00 - , 8.816.14 4,333.31 



O ; 



OJ 



DEPARTNENT 822: SRNT-SENEIt Subtotal.. 
TYPE- CO^EXPENSE- Subtotal-... 



30.126.03 
-0.00- 



0.00 
-0.00- 



. -, 0.00 
_0.00_ 



0.00 
-0.00- 



4,017.04 
-0.00- 



0.00 
_O.0Q_ 



6U.48 

L».oo_ 



32.993.33 

tUXL- 



;- 339.2B 
! 0.00- 



DEPARTNENT 123: 6RNI-PU BO Subtotal.. 




TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal 

L824^5WbSTATE-Subtota 

TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal 

DEPARTNENT 825: BRNT-FDFE1T Subtotal... 

TYPE 02; LXPENSEJubtotal... 

DEPARTNENT 826: GRNT-TITU VII Subtotal. 

TYPE 021 EXPENSE Subtotal 

-IEP«RI>OLa30-SilfcIITLE-L Subtotal... 



0.00 : . ■ - O.OO .. .., 
_l.733.74 . 0.00- 



-) 0.00. 

I.- — . 

_o.oo_ 



231.00. 

1.603. O0l_ 



. - 0.00 ■. in 
_0_)0_ 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



672.31 
_B3.60i.2i 



3.710.03 
r * ' 
i0.93J.3O_ 



3 



ran of iraicx eipixi map 
uma loser «rai 

f IXAL *CM 1992 

jue x. 1112 



o 


j 




















1 


o 


■ 


■UVIIUI 


m 


appropriatr 


AFTWRIATR 


TRAKSDS 


receipts 


reiwurse 


EXUSMCE 


PAY/CRTS 


turn 




• 

























2.043. n 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


3.227.00 


0.00 


0.00 


3.272. 2t 


0.00- 




-; 




3.283.42 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


33. BBS. 00 


0.00 


0.00 


31.211.aa 


12.041.46- 


o 
























o 






3.843.21 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 ' 


4.467.00 


0.00 


0.00 


S, 332. 21 


0.00- 






o 


- 




3.843.21 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


4. 487.00 


0.00 


0.00 


8. 332. 21 


0.00- 



























1.684.11 


0.00 


, 0.00 


0.00 . 


_ 0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1.184.11 


o.oo- 








1.B03.00- 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


io.7n.oo 


0.00 


0.00 


6. tot. 00 


0.00 


o 
























o 


- 


' 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 1 


' 70.324.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


70.324.00 






o 






0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


70.324.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


70.324.00 




; 






















o 


20.143.83 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


2.027. It 


0.00 


108.24 


32.US.63 


1.763.83- 




": 




3.001.30 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


4.(77.00 


0.00 


0.00 


3.63B.36 


4.03t.t4 


o 






















E 


o 




0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 










0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 


0.00 

i 1 


1 
























o 




3.4S3.S3 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


7.311.00 


0.00 


0.00 


6.024.24 


4.820.31 


k 




6.113.30 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1.630.00 


4.463.30 




[FFNmCXT 860: -S1FMALL HASELL Subtotal... 


6.113.30 

0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 












4.463.30 


0.00 


0.00 


MO 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


> 





; 


DEPflonen 861: Gin-oonr trees subtotal... 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


: 


'- 

r 

























DESSIPTIW 

TYPE 02iElTB6E Subtotal 

OEPARTREXT 864: 61FT-UBSARY Subtotal. 



TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal 

-OEPMtflOrt 863i Sin-SOER Subtotal. 
TYPE 02: FJPEXSE Subtotal 



DEPARTnEHT 866: 6IfT-tK Subtotal.. 

type, ta^aros. subtotal 



DEPARTlCHT 873: RVF0-HIST0R 12 Subtotal., 



TYPE 02 EJPERSE Subtotal 

DEP»JtI10(LBB4^FI9Lll<lLrLlrt. Subtotal., 

£1 fin) 24: ones spec revenue funk subtotal. 



TOM OF 1PSHIOI EIPD6E LEDGER 

HPENSE LEDSEB REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1912 

JUNE 30. 1992 

. FUND 24: OTIS) SPEC REVENUE FINDS - 



»T14 APPRDPRIATR 
0.00 0.00- 



TRAKSFERS 
0.00- 



RETZI/T9 
0.00- 



REllfUSE 

0.00- 



ENDICRna 

0.00- 



_0.00_ 
0.00 



3.213.00 
_6S0.7S_ 



0.00 

_o.oo_ 



o.oo 

_0.00_ 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



0.00 
-0.00_ 



800.00 
0.00- 



1.640.00 
_160.31_ 



_130.00_ 
773.00 



773.00 
_4t0.44_ 



O.OQ 168.768.00_ 

283.363.00 260.160.63 

21 _ 



TO* OF IF9ICH FJPE7CE LEDGER 

EXPOGE LEDGER HOT 

FISCAL YEN! 1912 

JUC 30. 1992 

-FUO 30:-CAPITAJ_-F«0JECTS FUND- 



OESCXIPTKW 
-TYPE-01:-0UTUY Subtotal. 



FTMARD APPROPRMTR APPR0PRIAT1I TRANSFERS RECEIPTS 
0.00 130. 000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00- 



DEFWmCKT 2721 CAPITAL OUTLAY Subtotal. 



-0.00 


130.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


.. i-0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


130.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 



Y 



TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal 

-DJJ'ARTlOT-JOJJ-HiaWY-Subtotal 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal , 

DEPARnENT 487: CTJNSRV Com Subtotal. 
1YPE -03: -OUTLAY -Subtotal..... 



-0.00 T 
0.00 
0.00 

-0.00- 



-O.00- 
0.00 ' 
0.00 

-O.00- 



o.oo 

-O.00- 



0.00 
-O.0O- 



o.oo 

0.00 

0.00 

'•^•'Mo-oo '* ' 



0.00 
-O.00- 



,} 0.00 
0.00- 



0.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



rati of ipshich expense lqbeh 

□PEMSE LEDGER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1992 

JUNE 30. 1991 

FUND 32: CAPITAL FUND I3C)- 



taDumai 

__ TYPE OJi OUTLAY Subtotal 

OEPARTrfXT 043: TM HULL Subtotal 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal 

. OEPAimCM- 202; EDLCAT 10K FJ? Subt ol al . 
TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal 

ixnwnerT 272: capital outlay Subtotal 

_riTt02_EXPE>_- Subtotal 

TYPE 03: outlay Subtotal 

uawu-Subtiiui 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal 

OEPAKTrCXT tot: SENER Subtotal 

. TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal — 

OEPAATIfXT 601: LIBRARY Subtotal 

TYPE 03: outlay Subtotal 

OEPtiraonJu^ittrEit-Pij-Subtcitai _ 

TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal 

uEPNrnCNT 912: HBTLH-CDCTnLU Subtotal 

stye ■■'■ 

TIPE-ll- OUTLAY- SUM otal 

OEPAATT€NT 999: niSTJ-lANEOUS Subtotal.. 
_FUC 32- CAPITAL FLMLUDCl Subtotal 

O 



FORM*- WTOPR10TM APPTOPAIATK 
2.3B O.OO 0.00- 



2.38 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


O.OO 


2.39 


1,702.33 


132.23- 


O.OO 


O.OO 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1.370.30 




















33.3t6.lt 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


12.116.78 


23.230.11 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



0.00 
_0.00_ 




4.443.43- 
-1.373.0 



0.00 
-0.00_ 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



0.00 
_0.04_ 



0.00 
0.00- 



0.00 
_0.00_ 



TOM OF IPSHICH FJPD6E LESSER 

EXPENSE LEDGER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1992 

JUNE X, 1992 

FUATJ 60: SF__R FUND 



0.00 0.00 

-O.OO 83iJt8.I 



0.00 
-9j7J-_l7- 



OESOIIPTIW 



— TYPE -41: SALARIES. NABES. -ETC -Subtotal. 
. TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal 

". TYPE 03: OUTLAY Subtotal 

TrPE-«:-FJ06Y aPPLIESfcitot.l.. 

TYPE Of: IUSC Subtotal 

-O?ARTNFXT-t0t:-SDCFUSubt<jtal. 



-217.099.00- 

133.136.00 

t. 900.00 

-406,479.00- 

0.00 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 



O.OO- 
0.00 
-0.00— 



-4.00- 
0.00 
0.00 

-0.00- 



0.00 
O.OO 
-0.00- 



167.30 

0.00 

—0.00- 



It6,t66.39 

t. 084. 00 

— S6.823.68 - 

0.00 



-t.406.ZI . 

7,702.11 

016.00 

49.433.32- 

0.00 



TDM OF IPSHICH EXPENSE LfJHS 

EXPENSE LESSER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1972 

JUNE 30, 1992 

FIND 61: KATBI FUN. 



-TYPE 01 ; SALARIES, BASES. ETC Subtotal - 

TYPE 02: -tPFJt-E Subtotal 

type ot: oetSY 3UTL1I3 Subtotal 



0.00- 
0.00 
0.00 



2S3.564.00 . 
94.031.00 
33.020.00 



-0.00- 
O.OO 
0.00 



-t.903.00_ 
30.00 
0.00 



-0.00- 
0.00 
0.00 



-0.00_ 
0.00 
0.00 



_ 0.00- 
O.OO 
33.17 



234.B49.07_ 
32.tS.0S 

33,330.24 



.31,617.93- 
31.643.92 

1, 413. 89 



OEPAKTrEXT 910: HATER DU1 Suit otal., 



— type ox OUTLAY Subtotal 

oemrtpext 911: hater ru St-totai. 



0.00 
0.00- 



402.613.00 
-49.780.00- 



0.00 
0.00- 



4.933.00 
. 0.00- 



0.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 
0.00- 



TYPE Ol! SALARIES. HA8ES. ETC Subtotal. 

TYPE 02: EXPEKSE Subtotal 

-TYPE 03; OUTLAY Subtotal 

TYPE ot: BCRSY 3UPPUE3 Subtotal 

- HATER. Hn.Subtotal 



TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal. 
OUTLAY Subtotal.. 
H>i v * #! TTPE Ot: ENER6Y SUPPLIES Subtotal., 

I-PA«TrE><T-_l4:- HAT£I<-PRI(Rjn_S<l>tot_L_ _ 



FuMD 61: HATER FUND Subtotal.. 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.0O— 
0.00 



132.778.00 

431.271.00 
0.00- 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



3.396.00 

423.00 

O.OOU 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00- 



0.00 
0.00 
-0.00_ 
0.00 



0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 
-O.OO- 
0.00 



112.338.33 
424.102.94 
0.00- 



0.00 
-0.00- 
0.00 



213.03 

-19.600.0 
0.00 



23.833.43 
27.393.06 
O.0O-. 



TO* OF IPSHICH EXPENSE LEDEER 

EXPENSE LED6ER REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1992 

_JU-30.Jt92_CF_IRLI_ 



1 
5 








FUG 80: TRUST t R8FJO FUND 












; 


A-XUtT NLItBER DESCRIPTIOH 


CARRIED 
FTAARD 


0R18INAL 
APPRDPSIATH 


STH_SUPP 
RPPROPRlAni 


TRAN5EJ- 


CURREKT 
RECEIPTS 


RE7-4DS 
RETJ-uY-E 


F-DJ-RANCE 


PAYlt-tTS 


K-AJCE 


i 


(4363-80-973-3980 TRUST FUCS ,C THIBRULT 
1102-80-973-3981 TRUST FUCS .R LTJNLEY FUND . 


26.115.88 
3,384.46 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


400.00- 

218.00- 

1.473.84- 


1.213.33 
334.73 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


1.200. 00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
4.04 

o.oo 


23.731.41 
3.323.19 


', 


"1 


! 1111-60-973-3984 TRUST FUNDS .RARINA JONES , 

11 10-80-973-3983 TRUST FUKDS .EUNICE CONLES . 
I U09J0_r73^39B6_THET___CS___JOtl I IPBAL ■_ 


1.046.33 

10,709.67 

317.74 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 

400.00- 

0.00 


31.14 

303.66 
23.22 


0.00 
0.00 
O.OO 
0.00 
• 0.00 


0.00 

400.00 
0.00 


4.04 
0.00 
0.00 


1.097.69 
10.213.33 

342.98 


- 


!) 


i - 1108-80-973-3987 TRUST FINE .RPPLETOR Km. 

' 1107-80-973-3988 TRUST FIMS ' .HILLIAH BfDH , 


3.B34.24 
789.82 


... 0.00 
* 0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


..0.00 
0.00 . 
0.00 ' 


. 284.44 
. 38.31 " 
94.73 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
4.04 
0.00 


4,118.68 

828.33 

2,433.x 


• 


_ 


_ 1080-80-973-3990 TRUST FUCS ,0OH BCU.DFR , 
2 1103-80-973-3991 TRUST FUNDS .HAROLD tt-EK , 
' 0693^-1-973-3997, TRURT FUKIIS .0-1 PfP CORF . 


B44.ll 
28,740.07 
162.938.22 


0.00 

0.00 
O.OO 


0.00 
4.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 

48.400.21- 


42.30 
1.344.94 
10.337. IB 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 

o.oo 


0.04 
0.00 
0.00 


908.41 

X. 123.01 
124,893.19 




Q 

3 
3 


^•.1104-80-973-3993 TRUST FUNDS .GE7I FUJBB . '. 
3. 0tl2-S0-973-399t .TRET FUCS .CRANE'S PICNIC. ; 
ll_H_-97V59?3. TB<iT Fl««i iJnSFPH >"?"K_i 


, - 13.067.43 
3t.43B.79 • 


. S coo 

• :■. ;0.00 


5 o.oo 

' V o.oo 

O.OO 


939.79- 
" 0.00 

1,100.00- 


.4- 343.37 
[ •' 2.393.12 


■ 0.00 
0.00 


4.00 
4.40 


0.40 

o.oo 

0.04 


12.713.23 
37.231.91 


■ 


1 1101-80-973-3997 TRUST FIMB .lUNIC INS FD , 
0673-80-973-3998 TRUST FUCS .tJJHSERV FU"B , 
1042-80-973-3999 TRUST FUCS .STAIILIIATI04 . 


16.143.82 
42.921.0t 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


11,937.00- 

4,3-7.30- 

0.00 


330.89 

1,994.63 
2.332.48 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 
0.40 


0.04 
4.00 
0.00 


4.337.71 

. 40.3-S.17 

31.482.98 


- 


! TYPE 02: EXPENSE Subtotal 




















446.183.88 
446,183.88 


-•"■ . 0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


49.834.34- . 
"69.836.3*- 


,. 23.397.48 
23.397.49 


0.00 

"'" 0.00 


1.400.00 
1.400.00 


0.00 
0.00 


398.323.20 
398.323.20 




444. 183. ee 


0.00 


0.00 


49.834. 34- 


23.397.48 


0.00 


1.400.00 


0.00 


398.323.20 








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